Inbreading question

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Momof8kiddoes, Apr 8, 2005.

  1. Momof8kiddoes

    Momof8kiddoes Well-Known Member

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    Hi all,
    can someone give me the low down on inbreading?
    If you read one of my previous posts, I was talking with a gentleman that was selling some of his jerseys, that were originally from the Isle. He said he did inbreading to keep the genes there.
    What questions should I ask him? How much inbreading can you do and still be ok? Any thoughts, please send them my way, thanks
    Mary F.
     
  2. Horace Baker

    Horace Baker Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't be overly concerned about inbreeding, especially when it is purposely done with genetic goals in mind. If the animal is sound, there shouldn't be a problem.
     

  3. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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  4. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Hi Mary,
    I have to admit to not knowing a great deal about in-breeding (line-breeding?) but should imagine that if it is being done by somebody who knows what they're doing and earning their income from it, you should be pretty safe.

    My experience is not so grand but the outcome makes me wonder. I bought a pedigree Jersey cow with a bull calf at foot. I left the bull entire thinking that by the time he was mature our fencing would be in good order. Not so. He got back at his mother and she produced a very pretty little heifer calf. The mother died three days later from Facial Excema and I kept the calf. She is now 5 years old and produced her third calf 4 weeks ago. She is small, perfectly formed with a nice even udder and produces nearly 20lts a day. I have had several people want to buy her but I won't let her go.

    What I'm really saying is that you probably can't go wrong. Go with your instinct which is what I did when I kept this cow. Probably not considered good farming management but who the hell cares if it pays off.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  5. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    I have heard that if you engage in very close breeding, you will either get absolute junk, or absolute gems. It tends to go one way or the other. If it turns out well it's called "line-breeding" if it turns out bad, then you call it inbreeding! :)

    The first trait to be affected by in-breeding is generally fertility, but that doesn't show. The affects will increase with each generation that is inbred. Make sure your inbred animals have a history of good fertility...time to settle again, semen test on bulls, etc.

    Jena
     
  6. wr

    wr Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Having been involved in breeding and raising purebred cattle and horses for years, I can tell you that line breeding involves a lot more than just breeding from the same family tree over and over to keep a line pure. You need a vast amount of knowledge in gentics, bloodlines and integrity. Even the best laid plan can turn out far different than all the laws of genetics suggest and generally in line breeding you are breeding 2nd & 3rd generations to current to achieve certain results but it would be highly unlikely to breed son to mother or first generation breed backs. I would suggest that if you are not aware of the bloodlines and don't have a sound working background with this man's genetics, you would probably be wise to just find a more common breed of Jersey. He sounds like he's working on breed purity and the historical aspect and with that kind of breeding, you can end up with some interesting behavioral issues.
     
  7. rabbitgal

    rabbitgal Ex-homesteader

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    Nothing wrong with inbreeding/linebreeding if the breeder knows what he is doing.
    Basically, each animal comes with it's own little "package" of genes. Some genes show up in the animal right away while others are hidden and only show up if both parents have the genes for a certain characteristic. Animals that are related have some of the same genes in their little package, so their offspring are more likely to have certain characteristics. Inbreeding is a great tool in the hands of an experienced and responsible breeder. Used properly, it can produce some really outstanding animals. Like Jena said, you can get junk or gems, and that's why you need someone who knows what they are doing and is willing to eliminate the junk from their gene pool.
     
  8. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    We have a few inbred animals, I call it inbreeding regardless of success. But either way, we have a couple, and they turned out well. One grew to the size of her mother in 14 months, the other is huge and grew well. Another one we have, is inbred and she turned out fine. The only fault has been the bulls, besides the one used for their sire. Either way, the only way to find out if it will turn out fine, is to try it.


    Jeff
     
  9. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The beauty of linebreeding is that undesireable traits raise to the surface. Don't be afraid to linebreed, but cull ruthlessly.