implanting stocker steers

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Unregistered-1427815803, Feb 20, 2004.

  1. I was wondering if anyone could discuss whether stocker steers placed on pasture for about 6 months to fatten and sold need to be implanted with a growth hormone? I have read where this process could improve the weight gain. I intend to aquire the steers at about 400 lbs. in mid-April and put them on pasture for about 6 months and supplement the bermuda and fescue with a protein feed supplement(Oklahoma super gold 25% supplement). I have read where the actual process of implanting can be difficult and if done improperly can adversely effect gain potential. Does anyone have any experiences that can be shared about this process of implanting and whether it is feasible or worthwhile? Also, does it have to be done by a vet or can anyone attempt it?? Thanks.

    David, a Mayes county, Okie
     
  2. wr

    wr Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I hate implants and we don't use them. Anybody that I know that does use them usually end up missing a calf or two for various reasons and by fall, they can't seem to tell the difference. My kids have always ate our own beef, which lacks implants and I think they're far healthier for it. They aren't necessary, in my mind it's just not a good idea. Calves will grow and gain well without.
     

  3. cowman

    cowman Well-Known Member

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    Implants are fairly easy to do and yes you can do it yourself. I prefer not to have them in the meat I eat but if you are going to send them to a feedlot you might as well reap the benefits because they will be implanted at the feedlot. I believe the last I heard you can expect about a 20 pound extra gain from the implant so at todays prices that is about a 20 for 1 gain on your investment.
     
  4. Dchall_San_Anto

    Dchall_San_Anto Active Member

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    A couple years ago I met a producer from Central Texas who routinely weans his Brangus calves 100+ pounds heavier than his neighbors' animals (all at 7 months) because he grows so much more grass. I won't bore you with the details of that, but after listening to him I started believing more in excellence of forage as opposed to modern technology. Once you get excellent pasture, then see where you are and where you want to go.
     
  5. Wanda

    Wanda Well-Known Member

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    I personally don't use implants but it is your choice. Placemant is important if it goes into the cartilage instead of under the skin of the ear they won't disolve.That means time, money, and benifit are all lost!!
    Mr. Wanda
    Mike
     
  6. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    1. I think the federal government should ban all growth hormones from livestock usage. I remember back when I was in 9th grade most of the girls would have loved to fit a 36B without tissue (and I looked!). Now that seems about par for a 6th grader. Better nutrition alone? Is is just me or has the average size of a woman's bust become larger. Better nutrition alone? When I was in High School we had two guys in the entire school (about 400 or so) 6' or a tad more. Now that's about your 10th grader. Better nutrition alone.

    2. Believe me, it is hard enough to get an ear tag in a calf or cow, much less trying to get an implant in the right place.

    3. Please think twice about your passing those growth hormones along.

    Ken Scharabok
     
  7. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    David,

    I don't implant my cattle, never have, but it sounds easy enough to do. I wouldn't be afraid of trying it, if that's what I wanted.

    There are a lot of ways to raise cattle and a lot of reasons for choosing how you want to do it. I don't implant or feed ionosphores, but I understand why some people choose to do it that way. You just have to do what is best for your situation.

    Good luck

    Jena
     
  8. jucal

    jucal Well-Known Member

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    David, I am also an okie. From all of the other posts so far no one has asked you if you would want to eat the meat yourself or feed it to your family. You have a great opportunity to feed yourself and your family the highest quality beef by raising it yourself. Not everyone can do that but most people if asked if they had a choice would choose the more natural beef. I guess if you don't have any objections to eating it yourself then do what you think is best. Just remember you don't know what you are getting when you buy it at the store. I milk and sell my Jersey cow milk and most of my customers are ones that are concerned with what they have to choose from in the store. I have people that will drive 30 miles to buy 2 gallons of milk at a time just because it is the most natural product that they can get. The other customers are the older ones that just remember what milk is suppose to taste like. You can probably get a far better price for your beef if you keep it as simple as possible and market it yourself rather than trying for the weight gain and selling at a livestock auction or feed lot. You will also have more rewards than just money when you have given someone something that they are looking for and can't get just anywhere. I do it every day and it makes me feel good. Ok I will get off my soap box now, but I do hope you make the right decision for yourself.
    Judy
     
  9. wr, cowman, dchall, wanda, ken, jena, and jucal,

    thanks for the responses to my post about implanting steers in order to possibly increase the weight gain while they are out on the pasture;
    I have weighed the pros and cons and am leaning toward no implants at this time.

    jucal, what part of oklahoma are you in??

    Again, thanks for your time and I appreciate the various points of view about this subject. Take care and good luck

    later,

    david, a Mayes county, okie
     
  10. jucal

    jucal Well-Known Member

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    Not to far from you David. Rogers county. 5 miles west of Oologah. I myself think that you have made a wise choice.
    Judy
     
  11. wr

    wr Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I think that you made a wise choice. I don't like to grow beef for others that I won't eat myself.