Im confused re the original jerseys from the Isle...

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Momof8kiddoes, Mar 29, 2005.

  1. Momof8kiddoes

    Momof8kiddoes Well-Known Member

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    Anyone that knows about this please inform me here. Im so new to this all.
    After searching quite a bit, I found an old timer that has jerseys that he purchased from the Isle...so, from where they originated, is what I gather. He has been line breading them and buying from the Isle for about 20yrs now. The price for a cow due to calf is around $2000. Now, assuming he can back this up (and Im pretty sure he can, he was referred to me by 3 different people), Im wondering the pros and cons to getting one. I guess the obvious con would be the price..but if other people are also looking for the original breed, maybe they would be willing to pay it when I breed too? I dont know. I dont want to get swindled, and I just dont have enough info to make a good decision. What are youre thoughts on this?
    Mary F.
     
  2. Momof8kiddoes

    Momof8kiddoes Well-Known Member

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    PS. Just re-read my post...too make it clear...Ive been looking for ANY jersey, and just happened to run into this fella. I like the idea of the original bloodlines...that is all. I dont know enough, beyond that, to figure this out.
    Mary F.
     

  3. JeffNY

    JeffNY Seeking Type

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    I knew of a heifer calf priced @ 2000, this is a Jersey "Spunky line". What seems to make the price is the genetics, and the demand. For instance, I can find a run of the mill holstein heifer for 400 or so. Then I can go buy something that has had 5 generations of excellent behind her (90+), for 10,000. The price is determined by the genetics, overall quality of that animal. Heck I know of two farms, one Brown Swiss, one Holstein offered 40,000 for a cow, why? Her genetic backround. In the case of that cow, being from the isle. You can find heifer calves (unless you want a bred Jersey) for 500-600. My 4 were 500 x2 and 600 x2. Very nice calves, good blood line, will have nice tight udders, etc. Couple years ago, we bought a Jersey heifer for 75.00. Not the greatest heifer, but she will produce milk next December. If you get something with a good bloodline, keep the breeding up, because the calf will be worth something, more so than something with a poor bloodline. Sometimes, and I say SOMETIMES, you get what you pay for.. But keep looking amongst individual farms, don't give up and try the auction!


    Jeff
     
  4. Slev

    Slev Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, I can tell you what was told to me about starting out with animals. If I bought sheep and was just starting out, buying the best, would mean paying a lot of money. Through making mistakes, I could loose a few along the way, during my learning process. (and did) Doing that with Registered livestock can be costly. Better to learn on something a little less expensive but not a junker.

    And then on the flip side. When I went to buy a horse, my friend said what's the difference between a nag and a $10,000 horse? The nag would produce a nag and the $10,000 horse would produce something worth more than the nag.

    Sounds to me that in YOUR particular case, I don't think I'd pay for top quality, unless you planned on showing and/or breeding. And even at that, it wouldn't hurt anything for you to get a starter cow, then upgrade.

    just my thoughts
     
  5. dosthouhavemilk

    dosthouhavemilk Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The linebreeding is what scares me, personally. Especially for that long.
    The Jersey breed has been hurt because of all the close breedings in the bulls available. Calves have been weaker and weaker. There is a reason Jerseys are considered weak nowadays and that tends to be because of the gross linebreeding and close breeding we have been doing with the breed.

    It was amazing to see a purebred Jersey calf up and moving in less than an hour. Our crosses are up in 10 minutes usually.

    Just out of curiosity, where are you located?

    I know of two farms who are like this fella and was wondering if your guy was one of those two farms.

    If all you are doing is buying a family milker, $2,000 seems very excessive. I have found great family milkers for two people both less than $500. Great looking animals as well. Love them Berretta daughters!

    What is in is the miniJerseys. If his animals fall into the mini Jersey range (under 42" I believe it is), then you can easily find buyers for your offspring.
     
  6. evermoor

    evermoor Well-Known Member

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    Yes jerseys were developed from the isle of Jersey in the English channel, right next to the isle of Guernsey. Can you guess what breed developed there?? Cows from the isle were the foundation of Jerseys here and everywhere,however the animals differ signifigantly. The isle cows are much smaller , not as correct on the feet and legs, less attractive udders,and lower production. The thing that scares me the most is that few have been imported in the last couple decades or longer. This as roseanne stated would lead to severe inbreeding. Many things can go wrong ( or right) pending on the outcome. I doubt this is worth your time and money. If what you want is a family cow start by looking for farms and asking. Breeding stock from hobbyist rarely bring the money as the same quality from a good dairy. As stated in other threads the jersey website has a breeder directory for starting point. Unless you live in North Dakota, Montana, or Wyoming it really shouldn't be a problem. The problem is high cattle prices across the board.
     
  7. Momof8kiddoes

    Momof8kiddoes Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the replies on this, definately some good info to chew on....
    Come to find out, I dont have the $ to put into her anyway..but good to know this stuff, for future use! Thanks guys!
    Mary F.