If you were just starting out...

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Unregistered-1427815803, Jun 3, 2004.

  1. If you were just starting out and had say 250k to work with, and could choose any of the continental united states, which would you choose? Why?

    I'm trying to figure out what area has the best overall value for tillable land for organic farming, good climate, inexpensive land, low property taxes(not hugely important), liberal water rights laws and good possibility of alternative energy use.

    Your input is appreciated!
     
  2. Or, if this is asking too much, maybe you could tell me a little about what it's like to homstead in your home state?
     

  3. westbrook

    westbrook In Remembrance

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    is this a forever place or a spec place?
     
  4. I guess a forever place. I wouldn't want to put blood sweat and tears into a place that I wouldn't want to stay...
     
  5. VonWolfen

    VonWolfen Well-Known Member

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    Man, you could open a can of worms with this one!! First...it is personal: family, medical needs, jobs, your past, etc., etc., etc. You can successfully do it anywhere. That being said, I've been involved in this stuff in one way or another since the late 1960's...and certainly some trends have remained and certain areas have continually been hallmarks of this life style. I'll give you my top 5...then 6 thru 10 will be those that are more debatable.
    1. Western North Carolina
    2. Arkansas and Missouri Ozarks
    3. Tennessee
    4. Kentucky
    5. South central Virginia
    next
    6. Pockets of the Pacific Northwest
    7. West Virginia
    8. North Alabama/Georgia
    9. Wisconsin
    10. Eastern Ohio thru Western Pa.

    Have fun...there is good soil in all of them...and it's a tough choice!!!
     
  6. kabri

    kabri Almst livin the good life

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    We just purchased land on the Olympic Peninsula of W. WA. It's more in the central part, which gets way more rain than the northern part, especially Sequim. That was an important consideration because we did not want to be concerned about water availability. We plan to be off-grid and should be in an area where the wind is funnelled up the Hood Canal. The county is much more liberal than the county Seattle is in. However, this would not be for everyone because of the 40-60" of rain per year the area gets! Soil looks good enough for pasture, we are not planning any large scale veg. farming, just animals and birds. Good luck!
     
  7. Hey kabri, if you don't mid me asking, how much did you pay for what acreage?
     
  8. kabri

    kabri Almst livin the good life

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    It was about $2300 per acre. It's a large parcel and we can't afford to move until we sell our current house. It's raw land, no power/well and is currently designated as forest land. We will have to pay penalty taxes for however many acres we turn into residential. However, we are hoping we can put most of the land that we clear into Ag because the taxes are way lower, and our intent is to raise our sheep and turkeys there. Hopefully a couple cows and horses too. We did have to agree to community covenants, and we negotiated hard to ensure we can farm and DH can bow-hunt! The covenants are not all bad, they should help preserve property values.
     
  9. mikell

    mikell Well-Known Member

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    If you have covenants they will be bad Just wait till they add more.

    mikell
     
  10. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    do you know what you want to do? just provide for your family or start a business? table crops? orchards? any animal production? what kinds?

    do you have concerns with weather? do you like access to cities or larger towns or do like the total boonies?

    that might help folks get a better idea.

    jena
     
  11. kabri

    kabri Almst livin the good life

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    Possibly this is true. However, we have lived with covenants for 10 years now with very little problem. It takes a majority community vote to change them and then file the new ones with the county. We were lucky that we could add our livestock provisions in before anyone else had closed... we were the first buyers.

    It all comes down to how well you are able to live in a community and get along with your neighbors. DH is a master at this (I'm not as patient sometimes :eek: ) and we have a core belief that we are not on this planet to live an "every man for himself" lifestyle. Being part of a community and helping our neighbors is a vital part of our lifestyle. Maybe these community rules are not for everyone :( but we are glad for it!
     
  12. Really, this is an idea that is still forming, for me. I am just trying to get an idea of the most hospitable places for homesteading in general. I read on here a little about the water laws in southern colorado, and that made that particular place a no-look place for me... So, I figure that the people here, having all their collective experiences could share them and give me an idea of where in the states is most generally a good place to look for land.

    I can't really be more specific, because my needs haven't become specific yet :)
     
  13. BTW, Kabri, you and DH sound a lot like my wife and I :)
     
  14. Peanut

    Peanut Member

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    This site gives you a little questionnaire to fill out, then gives you a few pages of places in the US that fit your requirements! You can read about each place and search for property or jobs as well. Lots of fun. Good luck with your hunt.:)
    http://www.findyourspot.com/default.asp?NewQ=3
     
  15. Mike in Ohio

    Mike in Ohio Well-Known Member

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    You should really consider the questions Jena raises.

    We ultimately decided to get a place closer to markets (Cleveland, Akron/Canton, Pittsburgh and Columbus are all within an hour and a half drive) so that as we develop our agro enterprises we have opportunities to sell retail and improve our margins. (For this reason in particular I disagree with VonWolfen list.

    If you need to work off your place for extra income you might consider how available jobs or work are for your skillsets. Are you considering your $250k in investment? Then you need to consider how to get a return on that investment. Is the $250k for land and equipment or just land? How much of a home do you need/want? outbuildings?

    If you are just getting started you can lay out a fortune just for equipment.

    As usual, jsut my 2 cents.

    Mike
     
  16. BamaSuzy

    BamaSuzy Well-Known Member

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    I'd find a state that is sparsely populated and which has no zoning or permits for their "country" land, then I'd buy as much land as I could and put me a little cabin right in the middle of it.....Once the land was free and clear and paid for I'd never never never ever mortgage it again for any reason...you live and learn...