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Hi there! I'm Daisy :)

My husband and I are planning on buying some acreage to start a market garden/pastured poultry enterprise either in Eastern NC (where we are now) or in Southern Oregon (where our folks are). We will have approx $100,000 liquid once we sell our current home, which we can put toward acreage, infrastructure, and a down payment on a home of some sort.

I would love some creative ideas on how my husband can use his master electrician skills to make money part time from home. He is amazing at what he does and can picture in his head pretty much any situation and troubleshoot from thousands of miles away. He is also a great teacher with thirty years experience in the trade. Most traditional electrician jobs are full time plus, and I need him home more.

We are ready to live simply and keep expenses down, but realistically there is no way we can live on just what we make off the homestead. So, I figured I'd come to the experts on creative problem-solving: homesteaders!

(As a bit of background, we do have chickens and gardening skills now, but will def be learning as we go on the homestead. I also own a fiber business, which has taken a real hit with the lockdown and travel embargos, so I don't see it as a real source of income for a while.)

Thanks so much!
 

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Honestly, I can't imagine how an electrician could work remotely. It seems impossible. Maybe he could try giving electrician consultancy or to give electrician lessons, but again, I am not sure if it is that simple. To be honest, I want to find an electrician program and get an electrician license. It seems like this is a high demanded job, and the salaries are also pretty high. When I stumbled on this site Residential Electrician [2021 Update], I decided it is an opportunity I must take advantage of, and the next month I should start my path in this area.
 

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If he has his master's license he should be able to be a sole proprietor of his own business. Then he can choose his hours/jobs. If you don't need a full time income, that is. Staying at home to work is still work.
 

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I'd set up a truck with tools, etc. and do small electrical jobs around the area.
As far as being able to use those skills and work from home, about all I can think of is doing electrical design work, drawings or consulting if he has those skills. Or possibly doing electric motor and tool repair, which isn't in as high of demand as it used to be, since so much stuff is disposable.
 

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You need to have good insurance. Hubby stopped doing mechanic work when one of his customers took a car to a repair shop for another issue and the repair shop lied about the work hubby did. They said he messed up a brake job and the guy was lucky the car was stopping. Of course the customer believed the shop.

Anyway, long story short, if something happens you can be sued. Cover your assets, get insurance coverage. Learn how to write contracts. Form an LLC to separate the side business from your home.
 

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If in Oregon, you need to have an electricians license.

Not sure how that works with out of state experience to do anything. Even just swap out a light fixture.

I would call the Oregon CCB. They are great folks and will point you in the right direction.

Easier, would be to just find a company that needs a part time service tech. Especially if he comes with his own tools.

Once again, not sure how that works with the experience requirement and needing a journeyman supervisor.
 

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You need to have good insurance. Hubby stopped doing mechanic work when one of his customers took a car to a repair shop for another issue and the repair shop lied about the work hubby did. They said he messed up a brake job and the guy was lucky the car was stopping. Of course the customer believed the shop.

Anyway, long story short, if something happens you can be sued. Cover your assets, get insurance coverage. Learn how to write contracts. Form an LLC to separate the side business from your home.
LLC doesn't really work, they name you individually in the suit as well as your company these days.
 

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Agree about not doing an LLC. My accountant advised against it. Expensive to set up and doesn't do what you want it to do.
 

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LLC doesn't really work, they name you individually in the suit as well as your company these days.
OUCH!!!! We didn't research what all it would take to set up a business and protect our assets, he just quit doing work for other people.
 

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I'd set up a truck with tools, etc. and do small electrical jobs around the area.

Or possibly doing electric motor and tool repair, which isn't in as high of demand as it used to be, since so much stuff is disposable.
If he is as skilled as you say he is, he should be able to get work when it suits him for whatever hours he wanted / needed. Of course, he won't be working from home - but will still bring in the income you need and your husband can pick the jobs he wants.

Around here, there is a repair shop that rebuilds motors, alternators, etc. Not only do regular go to him to have rebuilt parts put into their cars, but I know several companies that offer Rebuild / Exchange programs with such things, as the local guy gets all of their work.
 

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Does he have experience in solar, wind, or generator power ? If so, maybe he could do repairs & installations of those . He could work part-time for electrical shops in the area. How about teaching courses at local tech schools ?
 

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I see this is an older post, but I would have several concerns.

Does North Carolina have a reciprocity agreement with Oregon? Probably not. He may have to retest.

My electrical license is a personal license. It is not a contractors license. That requires all the insurance issues already mentioned be addressed ad well as other legal and financial issues.

The PV/wind experience would be a bonus. Experience with optical fiber, including splicing, is big. Being a lineman would also help. My background was primarily in low voltage which will likely require many more experienced technicians in the future. I'm retired now. It's more fun.

Good luck.
 
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