Ideas for searching for land in Canada?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Mountaineer, Sep 11, 2006.

  1. Mountaineer

    Mountaineer Well-Known Member

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    Well I have a place right now, but am looking for VERY cheap land elsewhere, for a cabin or holding property.
    I've tried mls.ca, realtors sites, plain old websearches on certain towns., etc. I really like the properties with Dignam Land (dignam.com) however you aren't able to just visit them. You basically have to send in your payment- if you get it- THEN you can go see it. Either that or someone else snags it first! Buying land is much more personal than that for me!

    If you have any ideas where else to look I'd love to hear it!

    Thanks for any help.
     
  2. DixyDoodle

    DixyDoodle stranger than fiction

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    Cheap land in Canada? LOL And where exactly would that be? :p

    I live in Canada, and I can't say as it's any cheaper up here. It's not the big ol' wilderness with vast unclaimed plots of land anymore, that's for sure. Most are owned by companies or by private hunting parties, etc. Or cottagers if it's remotely near water.

    Since you have tried MLS, maybe your only other option is to actually contact a realtor from Canada....if you have a particular area in mind, some of the better realtors can send you "hot sheets" which are new listings. These listings take a few days to show up online, and may give you the edge in bidding on a property.

    Good luck!

    DD
     

  3. QBVII

    QBVII Well-Known Member

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    Who is the poster who moved from California to Canada and built his own large log house?
    Alex? Is that his name?

    Anyway, he would be a good person to talk to...

    I just looked and yes, his name is Alex. He posted pics of his place he built, and everything. Great story.
     
  4. zealot

    zealot Soli Deo Gloria

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    Dignam usually gives enough information that you could fumble your way to the spot, if you wanted to.
     
  5. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    You'd have to define cheap. Best climate vs price is likely New Bruinswick, or Nova Scotia, Central Ontario isn't bad, but not exactly "cheap" "Northern" anywhere is likely cheap too.
     
  6. wr

    wr Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I would recomend that you carefully explore land that is incredibly cheap. With our range in climates, you have to realize that you could be getting yourself into something that isn't all that workable. Our soil type varies greatly from incredibly rich soil (which is expensive land) to poor quality soil or even primarily rock. Another thing to remember is that cheap land in the northern areas has a greatly reduced growing season and many years, crops don't come off till the following spring - if at all. The Medicine Hat, Brooks, Jenner area is so arid that you literally need so many acres of grass to feed a cow that it's crazy. Generally, Saskatchewan comes to mind when people suggest cheap land and you have to realize that it's very tough to find employment and although it's an incredibly beautiful province, winter is harsh. Parts of Manitoba are inexpensive but also have short growing seasons and wild shifts in weather. As an example of how great the land values vary, my parents and I live 15 miles apart, land in their area is worth @ $2000/acre and in my area it's closer to $4500/acre but I get a lot of rain and they don't. I'm sure not trying to discourage you but would like you to make a decision that better suits your needs.
     
  7. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    I know one fellow personally that moved in this area from Germany. He bought his property from Dignam back in the 60's. It was 'cheap', but it's land that is always wet, and he is constantly troubled by beavers. Though he is happy developing it with his red pine plantation that is now near maturity for his use. The road nearby that he lives is constantly innundated by hunters that don't respect his private land ownership thinking it's coarse crown land to tromp on. His worse headache is trespassers in the fall.
    By the time he's invested in his house, brought in electricity, and all the amenities for somewhat of a comfortable life, the cost beyond the land is about like anyone else living around here buying through the normal real estate market plus non residents pay an extra tax. I've seen the occasional Dignam property out in the sticks while hunting, and see the rawness and cost to get even a basic road in to develop, plus there are the provinicial codes for building required as anywhere else.
    If you have any interest whatsoever for buying land in Canada without coming to talk with a realtor first hand, it would be wise to reconsider.
     
  8. mamakatinmd

    mamakatinmd Well-Known Member

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    We have a home in Maryland. 2 years ago we decided we also wanted some land in Canada. We look at Dignam and this site http://www.canadianproperty4salebyowner.com/

    We contacted one of the sellers for a property of 150 acres in Massey packed up all four kids on the spur of the moment (in January, we did not know what a real Canadian winter was like yet, -40 when we got there) and drove 14 hours to see the property. The people and place were great. So the ads really are legitimate. Unfortunately, for the seller we stopped at a gas station and picked up a local real estate ad to compare prices. We saw a 400 acre farm with barn and house in need of work for the same price. We found a hotel, contacted the real estate agent for the other property. As soon as my husband and I stepped onto this property we new it was the one for us. The house was in better condition than we had even hoped. The land was what we were really after and were willing to put sweat equity into the house in exchange for more land. We purchased 400 acres, 100 plowed hay fields the rest timber that was never logged. It has a 7000 sq ft barn needs work of course but sturdy. A 2,100 sq ft farm house as I said needed work but livable. a wood shed, chicken coop, a pond, and a creek running through the property. The price was 150,000 canadian. With the exchange rate at the time that came to 120,000. american. whoo hoo!!!
    The place is in the province of ontario in a very small town between the cities of Sudbury and Northbay. There is still lots of property for sale in that area and a little further north like river valley, sturgeon falls, and cochrane. In dignam I see property for sale in Parry Sound which is nice but may be pricey due to near waterfront. I just looked through some of my paperwork and found the paper we picked up to originally find the farm. It was Cottage & Country Real Estate Trader Phn# 1800-268-2938 mine is from 2004 so won't do you any good but maybe you can call and order one to be sent to you. I do have a local to my farm homeguide that is only a few months old. If you want to pm me your address I will send it to you if interested. I think after some research the most important thing you can do is take a trip and drive around the areas. We are currently between both homes spending as much time in Canada as we are able. We hope to move permanently in the next few years. Oh, and the people! They are wonderful and friendly. We have met true kindred spirits in the area. They are as crazy and resourceful as we are and don't look at you oddly when you say you want to get a woodcookstove!! I would be happy to answer any more questions and will check back.
     
  9. tamatik

    tamatik Well-Known Member

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    I was sitting in the lunchroom at work one day about 7 yrs ago.(BC Canada)Someone had brought in a newspaper from somewhere,While thumbing thru it I noticed an ad for 41 acres,3 br house,60x40 workshop,pole barn ,regular barn and many out buildings ..$60,000.It was in manitoba.I called and was sent pix by the seller.Looked pretty good..Older style house and a metal workshop completely wired etc..Called again a few months later he said the price was reduced,Next July I fly out and fell in love with the place at first site.Made a one time offer of $41,000 and in 12 hrs was back on a plane for home.b4 I got on the plane the offer was accepted.I moved there a few yrs back and we loved the place..The seasons were so unpredictable that we built a big greenhouse and had a buncha chickens,milkcows,pigs,rabbits etc.We lived good til a housefire wiped us out.This was a bout 200 miles north of Winnipeg..Theres lotsa cheap land in manitoba and saskatchewan.Just make sure you have all your bills paid and are willing to work at some job that doesn,t pay well..If there is a job.The people there are super.

    Gord in BC
     
  10. Mountaineer

    Mountaineer Well-Known Member

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    Thanks everyone! I am in Canada (central BC) and aware of the crap that's out there too. In my area any "cheap" land is swampy corners of hayfields, or rock cliffs where you coud presumably blast a hole for a house.
    That's why I want to visit the site first.
    Just got a reply from Dignam's. They never mark the property- only on a map you have to first buy. That won't work!
    To me cheap land is $12k for 5-30 acres. So long as it has plowed roads in winter and isn't TOO far from nowhere. I've been up north, I love it.
    I'll check out that link- if there are anymore- please send em in. Thanks!!
    MamakatinMD I'll PM you after work!
     
  11. dennisjp

    dennisjp dennisjp

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    I had seriously thought about land in Canada myself, but I think not now. After joining in on HT, the people on here has taught me a lot. Especially about growing seasons and animal care. We have a post on here where we are trying to get as many people together as posible to purchase a large tract and split it up between us. You may conceder looking at it and seeing where it leeds to. You could always summer up there and winter down here. Just a thought.
     
  12. The Paw

    The Paw Well-Known Member

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    Last year I bought 155 acres for $50,000 in Southern Manitoba. 85 cultivated acres, big dugout/pond, about 40 acres of fenced pasture/bush, and the rest either minor wetlands or some unfenced scrub pasture. If you go a little further east into the Sandilands, you can get better deals. I am within an hour of Winnipeg, so it is possible to commute although I don't. Local unemployment is very low, but wages are not that great, although cost of living is also affordable. It all depends on what you want to do with the land, and if you can take the winters.
     
  13. Ramblin Wreck

    Ramblin Wreck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I bought a hundred acres with an old farm house a few years ago in New Brunswick. Since then, the land prices there have increased and the US$ has dropped in value significantly againist the Canadian$, which increases your price too. It was the site below that got me interested in New Brunswick, but I didn't make my purchase through this gentleman. He was of great assistance when I visited with him:

    http://www.homesteadsforsale.com/

    Other stuff you might want to know: Buying land in New Brunswick was not much different than buying land in the states, at least not much different than Georgia and Alabama anyway. Property taxes aren't that bad, about $400 a year in US...but as the US$ continues dropping the taxes effectively go up! You must pay your taxes either in cash or from a draft on a Canadian bank account, which isn't hard to establish if you want to get one. You cannot pay them with a credit card. There are large wet lands on some tracts, which is a good thing if your are hunting. Property on the grid with plowed roads will be more expensive. Canadian road sides are much cleaner than the US, and the people I dealt with were very courteous and professional.

    Best of luck to you.
     
  14. frazzlehead

    frazzlehead AppleJackCreek Supporter

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    12K for 5-30 acres? Don't bother looking in Alberta!

    Someone down the road has 3 acres up for sale: it has a well, power to the property line, septic field and natural gas. Treed, I think they are clearing a driveway but that's about it. No house. Price: 85K. This is not considered unreasonable, although it's double what I paid for twice that amount of property 1.5 yrs back (even when I factor in the cost of putting in my utilities).

    I have seen lovely properties listed in the middle of nowhere Saskatchewan for what I thought were great prices (probably still higher than what you had in mind though). The trouble is that although land costs less in the middle of nowhere, you'll have fuel costs to commute to wherever you stock up on supplies, and if you are shipping livestock or grain.

    If you're able to live off your investments or something and not have to commute to a job, though, then it's something that could work!

    Good luck! Maybe check the classifieds in the regional newspapers for the areas you are interested in ... you never know what you'll find. :)
     
  15. Mountaineer

    Mountaineer Well-Known Member

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    Ramblin that is a great site!!! I wish he had more offered but I will bookmark it for the future. Thanks!

    Frazzlehead- I bet it's the oil industry- everyone seems to be making $$ in Alberta (so I hear) that everyone can afford more. It's good if you already own! I don't think those prices ar incredibly high though (higher than I want though) but a lot of BC, except maybe 8 hours MIN from Vancouver... is $35K per acre for 10 acre-aprox parcels. 1-3 acres will be $350, minimum. Probably swamp. It's outragious!!! I just read the average house in the Vancouver area is $500k, and crack houses are not far from it. People just have so much money to burn there right now. Calgary you can get a semi-brand new home for $300k. And that was only $250k last year!!! Alberta is booming for better or worse.

    Thanks Rose- I looked it up, seems there's only 1 property available in my province and it was over a million!!!
     
  16. rileyjo

    rileyjo Well-Known Member

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    mamakatinmd,

    Are you located close to the Boneshaker road in Massey? We are neighbours, my sheep herding buddy is on Boneshaker and I'm about 40 minutes west.
    You lucked out, prices are going up fast, I'd love to have a visit and buy you a Tim's when you come up again.
     
  17. DixyDoodle

    DixyDoodle stranger than fiction

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    Well, there is a reason why beavers are on our nickles, after all. ;)

    Welcome to Canada! :p

    If you can stand the following:

    bone-numbing cold winters and worse windchills
    driving in snow up to your car bumpers (ok, almost.... but for real if you're in Newfoundland!)
    sweltering smoggy, hazy summer days
    skeeters, yellow jackets, horse/deer flies, black flies that will drive you mad and eat you alive
    bears at the dump and sometimes in the back yard
    raccons everywhere, even in the city
    dark winters (10 hours daylight tops, if you're lucky)
    Canada geese that poop on everything in site, including picnic tables
    hearing people say EH after the end of each sentence
    having land that is either too dry or too damp or too rocky
    listening to people chatter about hockey

    ...then you're meant to live in the Great White North.

    Oh, and once you're here, head straight to a Tim Horton's. Order a double-double. If you go somewhere else, you will be immediately identified as a foreigner, and therefore viewed with suspicion. :D

    DD

    PS> To give you an idea of prices......there is a cleared 8 acre plot for sale in front of our own property. He is asking $35,000 for it. That's about average for my area. Averages over the country are, say, maybe $1000-2000 an acre in small communities (unless they are close to expensive big cities like Ottawa or Toronto) but be verrrry careful about what you are buying. You get what you pay for. Cheap land is often swampy or too rocky, or has other 'faults' such as right-of-ways, etc.
     
  18. Bear

    Bear Well-Known Member

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    If you're searching for land in northern Ontario, you might try Wuerch.com Mostly geared towards the hunter, fisherman, remote land at cheap prices. It's hard to even get a bid on their land it sells so quickly!
     
  19. DaleK

    DaleK Well-Known Member

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    Go to www.ontariofarmer.com and go to the Rural Properties. It takes a while to load up and most of them are larger farms but there are some smaller ones there too. A lot of times larger cleared acreages are just as cheap as the 10-20 acre lots so don't rule them out. A lot of Northern Ontario is getting expensive as cottage country expands, there's some cheap land in the north ends of Hastings, Lennox & Addington and Frontenac counties though.
     
  20. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    my votes for new brunswick, got back two weeks ago and still marvell at the land ! biggest for us was no yuppies and lots of fish and wildlife!friend of mines father bought 12 acres of bush in charllote county new brunswick for $6000. canadian . put up a cabin (solar lighting) with propane frig and stove nother $5000. middle of no where (crown leases all around) nothing but moose for neighbours! more snow than ontario but milder temps ,fair bit of employment too for those willing too work, pay has come up some in the last few years. most of the people we ran into were friendly though they knew we were guests of a local family. ontario keeps going the way it is, we are looking at digging up some deep roots and moving!