ID help? again... purdy please? (Bush ID)

Discussion in 'Plant and Tree Identification' started by Dahc, May 18, 2006.

  1. Dahc

    Dahc Don't Tase me, bro!?!

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    You guys sure are a lot of help and I hate to come to this part of the forum because I don't have a lot to offer and always need help. I have 21 acres full of plants and cannot seem to identify 50% of them (quickly or without buying books). I have some resources saved in my bookmarks but it seems like the best resources aren't free anymore. Most of them are weed ID sites anyway and this one isn't a weed (or so I think).

    I have this bush that grows here and I've always wondered if it would be wise to move some up closer to the house. Maybe use more native plants that do well without much help.

    Here it is, any help would be much appreciated:

    Flowering Bush
     
  2. Wildcrofthollow

    Wildcrofthollow Well-Known Member

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    Dahc,

    my knee-jerk reaction is that it is not a shrub but is an herbaceous plant.
    Sundrops Oenothera fruiticosa. You are VERY south of me and we don't get sundrops until July or so, so that is really only a guess.

    If that is not it (likely), then I need more info than your picture gives me.

    How many petals do the flowers have?
    Are the leaves opposite? (come off the stem opposite one another), or alternate?
    Does the bare skeleton persist all winter (In other words is it woody?)
    Are you in the middle of pine woods? (as in long leaf pine savannah, still relatively common in your neck of the woods)

    We may have to go to books for this, I am not that familiar with GA flora
     

  3. Dahc

    Dahc Don't Tase me, bro!?!

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    I'll get all this info tomorrow morning and post it. The plants are on the far side of the property. We have eight acres of pines. I believe they are slash pines but long leaf is very popular here. Long leaf pine straw sells for a slightly higher price. The plants are in those pines.

    It's not Oenothera fruiticosa. The leaves are much longer and don't have so much of a point on the end. I cannot say for sure but I think I have seen them 6-8' tall, I just can't remember when or where.
     
  4. swamp man

    swamp man Well-Known Member

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    Really?I have slash pines,and my landscape customers,and landscape company owning buddies prefer the slash straw over the longleaf straw.Since Katrina blasted us,small bales of dirty,crappy straw are going for $6 each,and folks are beating down the door for it.I had about 4 acres of timber that I kept all tidy for straw harvesting, but still haven't cleaned up the mess that Katrina(that dirty little skank)made of it.
     
  5. Dahc

    Dahc Don't Tase me, bro!?!

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    Wow, I've got about 800 bales worth just laying here... lol. We usually let a mexican guy get, bale it and give us $.50 a bale and sell it for $2.00 a bale. I wish I had a trailer. I'd bale it and drag it over there for $6 a bale.
     
  6. caballoviejo

    caballoviejo Well-Known Member

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  7. Dahc

    Dahc Don't Tase me, bro!?!

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    I looked this up and didn't find any to be like this bush. The flowers are similar though. There may have been more that I didn't check out.

    A better description of the plant: The leaves are in sets of three. Here's a better pic . The flowers have all fallen off but there are these pods that may be more flowers or may be some kind of fruit.

    If I remember correctly, the flowers looked like 4 petals with 2 flaring out towards the base of the bud and two more meeting at the tips. I could be a little off on that.

    The stem is hard and green and kind of has a bamboo-ish look. I don't know if this will help or not.
     
  8. Wildcrofthollow

    Wildcrofthollow Well-Known Member

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    Now yer talkin!

    Ok, First reaction is Baptisia tinctoria Wild Indigo bush, yours looks a good bit different than ours do here but with some allowances for genetic change and allowances for the fact that you are about 800 miles away it is a good possibility.

    This is a great find for you, B. tinctoria is a great medicinal herb, useful as an anti-inflammatory (the tea as a wash) and also the root tea is astringent and antiseptic.

    If this is it, yours has much larger leaves than the ones I am used to seeing. so check it out!

    there is a good possibility that this could be one of the bush clovers. Watch that puppy and get a good flower shot. We do have this thing down to the Pea family for sure if the flower is as you describe.
     
  9. Dahc

    Dahc Don't Tase me, bro!?!

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    Do you think these pods are the seed pods? Every flower is gone and the pods are what's left. Maybe I should collect some and try to germinate them. There are only about 8 or 10 of them in the whole 8 acres of pines.

    I looked at wild yellow indigo, wild blue indigo, plains indigo and a few others. It has similarities to all of them but I think your suggestion is the closest fit.
     
  10. Wildcrofthollow

    Wildcrofthollow Well-Known Member

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    I agree that it is the closest fit, but is it correct?

    Hmmm

    A puzzler, that is for sure. I don't think that it is wild indigo bush, I've looked over your pics quite a bit. I will have to dig deeper I think. but I do think we are on the right track. If it is wild indigo, it sure as shootin looks different than the ones I'm familiar with.

    Maybe someone else will have some ideas as well. I'll keep lookin'
     
  11. Dahc

    Dahc Don't Tase me, bro!?!

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    I posted this on the Georgia Native Plant Society message board. It doesn't get much traffic but maybe someone will recognise it.
     
  12. Wildcrofthollow

    Wildcrofthollow Well-Known Member

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    If anyone would, it would certainly be the NPS. There are some verrrrrrry smart folks in the one here in VA.

    Caballoviejo's suggestion of Crotalaria should not be dismissed lightly, The rattleboxes that I have seen are much smaller than your pic, and in your pic the stems are missing the stipules that are indicative of rattlebox, but maybe they just are not in the pic.
     
  13. Dahc

    Dahc Don't Tase me, bro!?!

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    Oh, I didn't dismiss Caballoviejo's suggestion. I looked and I looked some more... and got tired of looking with all the looking. lol. My eyeballs started throbing.

    I'm probably going to do a little more looking along those lines.
     
  14. Dahc

    Dahc Don't Tase me, bro!?!

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  15. Wildcrofthollow

    Wildcrofthollow Well-Known Member

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    Now see, that is cool. Glad you found out. According to my references (Atlas of the VA Flora) We do not have that one here. Shame, it looks like a cool bush. We do have several other Baptisias and I am going to have to check and make sure that we don't have it just under a different Scientific name. The Atlas has a habit of having different Sci names, causes me a lot of confusion.
     
  16. Dahc

    Dahc Don't Tase me, bro!?!

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    I can't find any medicinal info on it but I would be happy to send you a few seeds if I am able to collect any. I think VA is good for this plant but it needs acidic sandy soil. There seems to be a lot of them on river banks in FL due to all the sand and the only ones I have came up in acidic sandy soil as well.
     
  17. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    :) Glad you ID'd the bush! Good show! Just one tip here re the mention of trying to ID plants without spending money...I could not do without our County Extension Service! Although they are 38 miles north of me, I take cuttings into them all of the time when I have the need to head up to the "big city"...I think these people are one of the most under used resources that we have.

    We pay their salaries...use them! It's free! LOL What could be better? :dance:

    Don't you love finally learning what a plant is that's been bugging you? What fun!

    LQ
     
  18. Dahc

    Dahc Don't Tase me, bro!?!

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    Theoretically, they should be as helpful here. One of the drawbacks of being in a little agricultural town, if it ain't peanuts, cotton, peaches or corn, they don't know much about it. I dealt with them repeatedly when I was trying to start an agricultural charity program. I guess that's what to call it. The whole thing left a terrible taste in my mouth. They are "willing" to help, just not equiped.

    It's a good idea for anyone who doesn't live here though. lol. Thanks for reminding us about our ag extensions. They can be helpful.