I'd appreciate any opinions on "cedar-apple rust" tolerant trees.

Discussion in 'Home Gardens, Market Gardens, and Commercial Crops' started by Oldhat, Oct 11, 2017 at 11:44 PM.

  1. Oldhat

    Oldhat Well-Known Member

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    TN
    I am a transplant from S. Ohio to Middle TN and am not familiar with cedar rust tolerant apple trees.

    When I first moved here I planted a few apple trees. Some have done OK and others not so great. Cedar-apple rust is a big problem around here and after talking to the locals they all pretty much gave up on growing apples around their farms/homestead/etc.

    I've done a bit of research and found trees that a very resistant to cedar-apple rust but when it comes to what type of apple I am getting I am lost.

    Any of you growing any cedar-apple rust tolerant trees? What's the name if so? What do you think of the apples?

    I've pretty much decided that I will scour the ends of the earth in order to find an acceptable apple tree (or a few) because I will not be denied my apples. But at this point it's not that cheap to have them shipped here and I have no clue in really what I am getting.

    Any advice would be appreciated. I've lost a few trees already that were not cedar-apple rust tolerant and 3-5 I have managed to control it. However it's only a matter of time before I lose them all. I'd much rather start anew, order 5-10 trees and get the process under way right now vs having to do it in a couple years anyway.

    I've talked to 2 different local nurseries and even to the folks at Tractor Supply, but when it comes to cedar-apple rust they have no answers/products to offer.

    Any advice, experience, or type of apple trees anyone is growing here that is offered up that deals with cedar-apple rust would be appreciated.
     
  2. Dustin

    Dustin Well-Known Member

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    South Central VA
    I just filled up my shopping cart an hour ago with my planned purchases for fruit trees this year.

    Enterprise
    Liberty

    Google 'disease resistant fruit trees' and check out the Stark Bros. link that comes up. Their descriptions go over their resistances.
     
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  3. geo in mi

    geo in mi Well-Known Member Supporter

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    https://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/BP/BP-132-W.pdf

    You'll need to consider three things, though.
    1) You may find a rust resistant variety, but it may be susceptible to some other kind of disease or condition.
    2) You'll need to find out if the tree you choose will be okay for your climate and chill hours.
    3) You will want to know if you like its taste, texture, and baking, keeping abilities...

    geo
     
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  4. Oldhat

    Oldhat Well-Known Member

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    TN

    Will def check Stark Brothers out. I've heard of them in the past and am sure I visited their site but can't remember. Have you ordered from them in the past? If so are you happy with them?
     
  5. Oldhat

    Oldhat Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the PDF file.

    In regards "may be susceptible to some other kind of disease or condition"....Oh, I am a "realist" and through nearly 50 years of knocks, bangs, broken bones, etc that one never gets anything for free and seems to always have to rob Peter to Pay Paul. Lol. That's why I figured that I might as well bring this up on here. I figured some of the good folks on here had already been down the road I'm walking in regards to apple trees and rust.

    Again, thanks for the PDF. I breezed through it and am about to read it again and then head to the Stark Bros page and see what they have.
     
  6. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I live in an area with cedar apple rust, and my Golden Delicious tree was healthy. It also set way too much fruit and so the apples were tiny, but tasty. It also tended to bear every other year. I know that better thinning is the answer, but I never got around to do it.

    I also have what is ether a Liberty apple or a Freedom Apple, and while it is a young tree that has not yet produced any fruit it appears to be healthy.
     
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