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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just can't seem to get the hang of it :( I have two does, both will be a year old next month. I can NOT figure out how to trim their hooves! :( I have brought them up to the place I bought them from and the woman has trimmed their hooves a couple of times (with me observing to learn), but when it comes time to do it myself, I just can't :( I don't know what to do, what I'm doing wrong, etc. One of the does has long hooves that need to be trimmed, and I just went out, tethered her to the fence and tried to do it, and I just couldn't. I'm clueless :( How the heck am I going to learn to do it? I've read books, looked at step by step drawings, photos, even watched a couple of videos, and I STILL can't do it :(
I've tried finding local people to come do it (I'll pay them of course), but I haven't had any luck with that, either.
I need some guidance BIG time on this one.
 

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I just can't seem to get the hang of it :( I have two does, both will be a year old next month. I can NOT figure out how to trim their hooves! :( I have brought them up to the place I bought them from and the woman has trimmed their hooves a couple of times (with me observing to learn), but when it comes time to do it myself, I just can't :( I don't know what to do, what I'm doing wrong, etc. One of the does has long hooves that need to be trimmed, and I just went out, tethered her to the fence and tried to do it, and I just couldn't. I'm clueless :( How the heck am I going to learn to do it? I've read books, looked at step by step drawings, photos, even watched a couple of videos, and I STILL can't do it :(
I've tried finding local people to come do it (I'll pay them of course), but I haven't had any luck with that, either.
I need some guidance BIG time on this one.
I don't live in New Hampshire anymore, or I'd help you (my ex probably wouldn't appreciate being volunteered! But he used to do ours so I know he knows how... if we can't figure out anything else, I'll talk to him and see if he'd be willing to help you out. He probably would, actually. He lives near Laconia.).

Anyway, can you talk to the person who has done them before and see if she will teach you how to do it? You'd have to take them back to her one more time, of course, but it would probably be worth it if she's willing to walk you through it.

Kathleen
 

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What do you mean by "can't do it"?

Are you having trouble holding the feet? Trimming them at the right angle? What?
 

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There is a really cool little book, surely you could find it on half.com or amazon...Nanny Manicures. Also go to ADGA.org and look up the LA booklet, it shows the correct angle of the feet also.

Hunt for a club on ADGA.org also, or simply look up folks in your area and ask them if they know a 4H kid who does hoof trimming, disbudding etc... Vicki
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
What do you mean by "can't do it"?

Are you having trouble holding the feet? Trimming them at the right angle? What?
I just don't know what to do when I get the hoof in my hand. I've seen it done before, but I just don't know where to start. I wish I could explain it better.
 

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I clip them and then use this little thing from the hardware store that looks like a cheese grater, called a drywall rasp, to even them up. Works great for us. We also have one person sitting on a small stool holding them while they are resting on their backs. That settles them down. I think you could even use the rasp and just keep filing. That little tool is worth its weight in gold.
 

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To get started, just clip the hoof wall that has grown past the sole, and any flap on the heel. Then look at the hoof from the side, it should be the same length at the toe as the heel. If it's off by much, you may not be able to even it up in one trimming, just take a little at a time and if the sole starts to look pink, stop. Don't fret about it. Just think about a stable, even foot for the animal to walk on. It's not like horses where if you strike blood you've REALLY screwed up, no biggy :)
 

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And see the horizontal rings on the hoof? You want the bottom of the foot to be level with those rings.
Hey I was apprehensive the first few times so dont feel bad. We were all newbies at some point.

Take your time with each hoof, dont rush it. Talk to her, tell her what a good girl she is even if she's being a pill. Goats are good at picking up vibes. If you are in a hurry they will make sure it takes twice as long!
Like others said, when you see pink, stop.
You WILL get the hang of this!! You CAN do it!
 

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i am still learning it, dont' do it well (funny how i can do it great on some of the goats, but wow, that buck's feet look terrible?! ) but none of my goats are in any eminent danger from it. in fact, i bought an older saanen doe this summer whose feet were sooo terrible, the poor thing only walked on her knees!? unreal (and he still had this last one cuz she was his favorite?) her feet grew straight, didnt' curl up or break off. so we whittled and worked over the whole summer. now, she walks pretty well, i think she wont' ever be great, but she is happy. just do a bit at a time, heck, take the book with you, put it down in front of where you're working, and just do it!
 

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If you clean off the hooves and take a marker and trace the hoof line that makes it easier to follow. Start at the heel and trim toward the toe. I trim the hoof and then I use a rasp to file off the heel and sorta straighten everything out. It is trial and error. Even if you don't do a great job, its better than not doing it at all. Also, if you take the goat over to the lady that has done them for you before, instead of watching her, do it with her so she can show you while you are doing it. Good luck, once you've done it, you'll feel better about it and so will your goats.
 

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The big thing I've found is to.. just do it! Honestly, I was so darn scared the first few times, but it really is easy.

The biggest hint is the growth rings- try to get it all on the same ring (which means you might be taking quite a bit off the toe). It's important- your goat will have trouble walking if you don't take care of it (not to mention the nasties that can happen from manure/mud packed into it). My first trimming job I think I did one hoof per day for four days LOL! Not the best option, probably, but at least I knew I only had to get through one foot at a time!

Meghan
 

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I put a collar on mine and then tie them to a wall. Then back them up until the leash is tight. Then I hold my knee right in front of the hind leg to stabilize them and then I stretch out the hind leg. It's natural for a goat to struggle if it feels off balance. Do similarly for the front only pull the leg forward. Do one side and move them to face the other direction.

Those cheese grater rasps work really well especially if the hooves are soft from walking in wet grass.
 

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i do mine as needed, every so often i pick up a hoof on every goat and trim the one that neds to be trimed :) cause my goats hoofs dont all grow at the same rate, but on average i would say about every 3 weeks
 
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