I Need Help!

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Goat Freak, Nov 24, 2005.

  1. Goat Freak

    Goat Freak Slave To Many Animals

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    O.K., if anyone remembers my thread "New Baby", they know that our Boer goat herd queen Queenie had a BEAUTIFUL baby girl that me and my mom had to help get out, well now she has a problem. One of her legs is bent, like it grew wrong, and she is having problems walking, she walks but she kinda uses the ne leg like a critch, she can't bend it the right way. is there ANYTHING that we can do for her, she has no problem walking right now, but she is a BIG girl that came from a BIG buck and a BIG doe, so she is going to be BIG, so would she have problems due to her weight and her lameness, would it help if we put a splint on it, is there ANYTHING that we can do for her, I REALLY don't want to have to put her down. Please, any help or advice will be greatly appreciated, thank you in advance.
    Bye.
     
  2. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    well is it that she cannot move it right, or is it painful for her to do so? did you try moving it like it should? if it can move that way, I would try splinting it and calling the vet to come see her. I don't think any of us can help the way the vet would if he saw her and was able to examine her. Good luck with her...... :(
     

  3. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I bought a doeling that did this with both legs one year. It was a selenium deficiency. I gave her a shot of Bose and within two days she was walking normally. Might that be the problem??
     
  4. chamoisee

    chamoisee Well-Known Member

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    How old is she? It is common for this to happen with newborn kids, for the first week or so. If she is older than that, then I would worry; otherwise, it should resolve spontaneously- just make sure she is able to nurse regularly until then.
     
  5. Goat Freak

    Goat Freak Slave To Many Animals

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    Thank you SO much! Where do you get Bose by the way, and what does it do? She is only 2 days old by the way, so it is normal then? She only has the problem with the one leg, is that normal? She is nurseing just fine, and she walks fine too, she just walks a little bit funny like, and the only reason we are worried about it is because she is going to be a big goat when she grows up, and we are worried that she will not do as well when there is more weight on the leg. Once again thank you guys SO much, bye.
     
  6. Misty

    Misty Misty Gonzales

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    Make sure you are in a selenium deficient area. Selenium toxicity can also cause the same sypmtoms as deficient. You can take a 1 or 1 1/2"pvc pipe and cut it length wise in half. Cover with cotton, (keep mini pads around for that), vet wrap on and it will work like a cast..
     
  7. goatkid

    goatkid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You get Bo Se from your vet. Baby goats get 3/4 cc sub-Q. Your vet should be able to tell you if you live in a selenium deficient area. A good way to prevent selenium deficiency in your older goats is to free feed them a good goat mineral such as the one made by Purina. This should help prevent mineral deficiency problems in your newborns.
     
  8. chamoisee

    chamoisee Well-Known Member

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    If she is only 2 days old I wouldn't worry at all, and I wouldn't splint her. Her leg will straighten out either way. Just be sure that she's eating Ok, that's all.

    At times I have had at least half my kids born with soft/bent/crooked pasterns or joints, and they always straighten out within a week or less. Our area is selenium deficient, but it happened even when I did the Bo-Se and selenium salt stuff....and as long as they get enough to eat, they recover just fine, so I quit worrying over it.
     
  9. Goat Freak

    Goat Freak Slave To Many Animals

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    Well we do have purina meat goat food, so I quess that we did good by getting that. It isn't so much that her leg is soft in that area, right ON her knee cap, it is just hard and twisted, hard like it would be on any other baby goat. Thank you everybody for being so helpful. Bye.
     
  10. chamoisee

    chamoisee Well-Known Member

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    Oh, my bad. :oops: What I meant by soft, is not that the bone or joint itself is soft, but is folds under or acts in a "soft" or floppy manner when the kid puts weight on it. Especially with the rear legs- the hock joint just flops all over and they really have a hard time standing up.
     
  11. titansrunfarm

    titansrunfarm The Awesome PT & Friends

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  12. Goat Freak

    Goat Freak Slave To Many Animals

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    chamoise: no it is not floppy it is really theopposite, it is very stiff and she walks on it as though she has a cast on it, it is stiff and outwards, and it will bend inwards but not all the way outwards.
    titansrunfarm: I don't exactly understand, I live in Florida and it said that the selenium in the area is low, is that bad?
    once again thank you for all your advice.
     
  13. titansrunfarm

    titansrunfarm The Awesome PT & Friends

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    GF, does this help?
    If your baby is low on Selenium and Vit E (need Vit.E to properly absorb Selenium) the vet should be able to tell you how much to give her, BoSe is the shot, I don't know if there is an oral version of this or not. (Sorry the text is long, but it is copywrited so I didn't want to edit it any).


    White Muscle Disease (WMD) in Sheep and Goats
    Stiff Lamb Disease
    Nutritional Muscular Dystrophy
    by Susan Schoenian
    Area Agent, Sheep and Goats
    Western Maryland Research & Education Center
    Maryland Cooperative Extension


    What is it?
    White muscle disease (WMD) is a degenerative muscle disease found in all large animals. It is caused by a deficiency of selenium and/or vitamin E. Generally, it is not known which. Selenium (Se) deficiency is associated with selenium deficient soils and the inadequate uptake of selenium by forages grown on these soils. Certain areas of the U.S., including the Northeast, are considered low in selenium levels. Selenium deficiency occurs when the soil contains less than 0.5 mg Se/kg of soil and locally harvested feeds contain less than 0.1 mg Se/kg of feed.


    Lamb with White Muscle Disease

    Vitamin E deficiency is independent of soil type and more closely reflects forage quality. Grazing animals usually consume adequate amounts of vitamin E. This is because fresh legumes and pasture are good sources of vitamin E, whereas silage, oil seeds, root crops, cereal grains, and dry hays tend to be poor sources of vitamin E. Prolonged storage of feedstuffs results in a degradation of Vitamin E activity, as much as 50% per month.

    In addition to WMD, selenium and vitamin E deficiencies can produce symptoms of ill thrift and reproductive losses: lower conception rates, fetal reabsorption, dystocia, retained placenta, reduced milk production, and reduced semen quality. They can cause poor rate of growth or ill thrift in young lambs throughout the growing period. Sheep consuming selenium-deficient diets produce low wool yields and have increased incidence of periodontal disease. Selenium and vitamin E also play key roles in the animal’s normal immune response.

    Symptoms
    All breeds of sheep and goats are suceptible to WMD, and the condition may develop under extensive or intensive management systems. WMD is most commonly found in newborns or fast growing animals. Kids are believed to be more susceptible than lambs, possibly because they have a higher requirement for selenium. The disease can affect both the skeletal and cardiac muscles. When the skeletal muscles are affected, symptoms vary from mild stiffness to obvious pain upon walking, to an inability to stand. Lambs/kids may tremble in pain when held in a standing position. A stiff gait and hunched appearance are common. Affected lambs/kids may remain bright and have normal appetites, but eventually they become too weak to nurse. When the problem occurs in newborns, they are born weak and unable to rise. Sudden exercise may trigger the condition in older lambs and kids. When the disease affects the heart, the animal shows signs similar to pneumonia, including difficult breathing, a frothy nasal discharge (may be blood stained), and fever. The heart and respiratory rates are elevated and often irregular. Skeletal and cardiac muscle disease may occur concurrently.

    Selenium deficiency can be confirmed by measuring selenium levels in whole blood or tissues. A diseased animal will have less than 0.04 ppm of selenium in its blood. Breeding ewes require more selenium, and their blood levels should be over 0.5 ppm. At necropsy, the muscles of affected animals appear paler than normal and may show distinct longitudinal striations or a pronounced chalky appearance due to abnormal calcium deposition.

    Treatment
    Treating the heart form of WMD is usually ineffective and those that survive often do not thrive because of the residual cardiac damage. The muscle form of the disease can be successfuly treated with supplemental selenium and/or vitamin E. Producers need to follow label directions carefully when using selenium for treatment. The concentrations of selenium (per ml) vary greatly with each product, and excessive or repeated injections can result in selenium toxicity and possibly death. The commercially available selenium/vitamin E product(s) commonly used in the U.S. do not contain therapeutic levels of vitamin E. Additional vitamin E may need to be provided through an injection of vitamin E alone or through oral vitamin E products. Affected animals usually respond favorably to a single treatment of vitamin E and/or selenium in 24 hours, though recovery may not be complete, depending upon the severity of the condition. Animals which do not respond to treatment may be treated a second time. Treatment should not exceed two doses.

    Prevention
    Deficiencies occur when animals are fed poor-quality hay or straw or lack access to pasture. High concentrations of other minerals (e.g. calcium, sulfur, copper) and feed contaminants (e.g. nitrate, unsaturated fats, sulfates) may decrease absorption of selenium in the small intenstine. Diets high in polyunsaturated fatty acids or deficient in Vitamin C and/or beta-carotene increase vitamin E requirements, whereas adequate dietary selenium is almost completely protective against vitamin E deficiency.

    WMD can be prevented by supplementing the diet of susceptible animals with selenium and vitamin E. Since it occurs mostly in lambs and kids whose mothers were fed a selenium-deficient diet, supplementation of pregnant animals helps reduce disease in newborns. This is because selenium is transferred from dam to fetus across the placenta and also is present in the colostrum. While not much Vitamin E is transmitted across the placenta, colostral levels of Vitamin E increase with ewe/doe supplementation.

    While pasture, hay, grain, and other supplements can be analyzed to determine the amount of selenium to be added to supplemental feeds, it is important to note that selenium supplementation is controlled by law. For sheep, selenium can be supplemented in a complete ration at a level up to 0.3 ppm, in a feed supplement so that the intake of selenium does not exceed 0.7 mg per head per day, and in salt/mineral mixes at 90 ppm as long as total daily consumption does not exceed 0.7 mg/head/day. Selenium supplementation of feed has not been approved specifically for goats.

    Injectable selenium compounds are available to prevent WMD in at risk-animals; however, injections are a poor alternative compared to routinely providing adequate selenium and vitamin E in the diet. Ideally, the total diet for sheep and/or goats should contain 0.10 to 0.30 ppm of selenium.


    References: Sheep & Goat Medicine edited by D.G. Pugh (2002); Goat Medicine by Mary C. Smith and David M. Sherman (1994); and Sheep Production Handbook by the American Sheep Industry Association (2002).


    © Copyright February 2004. Maryland Small Ruminant Page.
     
  14. Goat Freak

    Goat Freak Slave To Many Animals

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