I Need Help, Please

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Speciallady, Apr 24, 2006.

  1. Speciallady

    Speciallady Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    868
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Indiana
    I am on a committee to help a young man. He was seriously hurt in a car accident. He is in a wheel chair and is unable to get himself onto the toilet properly or take a bath. So here is what I am thinking. I know some people who have built saw dust toilets. I have it in my head but don't know how to make it. I need plans for that and also on how to get him a bath. Would an old wash tub be suitable. They can't afford to rebuild the bathroom. So I'm thinking they could curtain off another part of the house. Please help me to organize my thoughts and make this a reality thanks so much
     
  2. Tabitha

    Tabitha greenheart

    Messages:
    1,751
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2006
    Location:
    Ky
    If he has trouble using a regular flush toilet, a sawdust toilet will not be an improvement for him. Unless he needs a toilet higher than normal, then a sawdust toilet could be made as high as needed. Check out Joe Jenkins, the plans are on line.
    prayers and blessings
     

  3. Speciallady

    Speciallady Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    868
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Indiana
    He does need it higher and he isn't able to fit into the bathroom now.
     
  4. MarleneS

    MarleneS Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,553
    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2003
    Location:
    Arkansas
    You might contact your nearest "Habitat for Humanity" - they are most known for building houses, but they also do remodeling and repairs for people who can't afford or get regular financing. Sometimes all they can do is offer the building materials, hopefully you can round up someone to help build if that's the case.

    The world's a better place because of you.

    Hugs
    marlene
     
  5. jane2256

    jane2256 lurking in the shadows

    Messages:
    293
    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2006
    Location:
    North FL
    Why is he unable to get on the toilet? Is it because of his injuries or is it his weight? What kind of personal help is he receiving? Is he getting any kind of physical/occupational therapy, this should be addressed during a session.
    The bowel can be trained to evacuate at a certain time of the day, and it may be easier to transfer the person from the bed to a comode chair first thing in the morning. So, getting 'things' to cooperate to work first thing in the morning may take a couple of stressful weeks, but will be worth it in the long run.
    For the bath tub, there are various shower chairs and benches that are useful for sliding in and out of the tub. Doesn't sound like it would be a good idea for him to sit down in the tub, might be difficult getting him out, but to sit on the chair/bench and wash can be very effective.
    Talk to a physical/ occupational therapist or try a medical supply store for suggestions.
     
  6. beorning

    beorning Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    606
    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2006
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    Where do you live? Depending on the state, there is money available for rennovations neccesary for someone who is disabled. Does the person in question recieve SSDI or MA benefits? I manage for a company that works with disabled adults in Wisconsin. We have a lot more funding available here for people with disabilities than most states, but I'm guessing that federal funds exist for this type of situation as well. I would suggest a shower with a hosed shower extension, rather than a bath. It will be much easier, in the long term. It's also pretty easy and inexpensive to set up a warm weather, outdoor shower facility.
     
  7. MorrisonCorner

    MorrisonCorner Mansfield, VT for 200 yrs

    Messages:
    3,736
    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2004
    Location:
    VT
    Is this a short term issue (he's temporarily in a wheel chair but is expected to regain some if not all mobility) or a long term life issue? If the issue is sort term.. what are they doing right now to accommodate him?

    If the issue is long term... you've got some serious fundraising issues in front of you that a "sawdust toilet" isn't even going to begin to address.

    Can he stand for short periods or not at all? Will he ever be able to stand? Does he have open wounds or dressings, casts, braces, etc that can't get wet?

    While this is one creative forum, I'm thinking the most efficient use of your time is to call the physical therapy department at your local hospital and explain the problem. They'll be able to refer you to agencies and/or facilities which have the equipment and skills to deal with this man's disabilities. You don't have to buy the state of the art "whatever," but you'll get an idea of what is out there to make the lives of the disabled more comfortable and more efficient.

    He may also be eligible for state or federal programs based on his level of disability and how perminant it is. These should be top priority right now, because he'll need the PT, he'll need some of the tools, and he'll certainly need some of the cash, these programs offer.

    Lastly... if it is a matter of inches.. tear the door out and take out the frame. You can curtain off the bathroom and reinstall the door later.
     
  8. jassytoo

    jassytoo Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,285
    Joined:
    May 14, 2003
    Location:
    Western WA
    There is tons of specialized equipment out there for people in wheelchairs. We have a grandson who is disabled. Lots of the equipment can be borrowed. If he has a therapist or even his doctor or hospital can get him in touch with the organizations that do this or do a web search. His therapist should also be able to tell you exactly what he needs depending on his disability. For a toilet you might be able to find an old fashioned comode. For a bath, there is a bath chair made that suction cups to the bottom of the bath and you could get a hand held shower.Thats if someone could help him into the tub.
     
  9. Speciallady

    Speciallady Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    868
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Indiana
    dfc will only pay for a small portion. It's a permanent thing. They rent there house and the landlord will only allow them certain changes. He is being as fair as possible. I just need to know how to construct it. I can't afford the book right now. His mom is taking care of him and it's not easy on her.
     
  10. FreightTrain

    FreightTrain Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    630
    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2005
    Location:
    Sullivan County Pa
  11. bostonlesley

    bostonlesley Guest

    Every state in the country has some kind of disability agency. They can be located by calling the governor's office (usually toll-free) and asking how to reach them.

    I rent, and am totally disabled and use a WC..just ONE of our county's agency's is called "Life Center"..they have loaned a bunch of equipment to me which I needed and couldn't afford. Also, if someone is renting, under the American with Disabilities Act, if the disabled tenant requires renovations to an apartment such as wider doors for a WC, or a handicapped-accessible bathroom, the landlord must permit these alterations to be done, at the expense of the tenant..the changes need not be switched back unless the changes would preclude the landlord from renting to someone else.
    For instance, state supreme courts have ruled that widening doors cause no decrease in future potential renting, while lowered counters would.

    "At the expense of the renter" just means that the landlord isn't expected to pay for it. There are numerous state agencies which will pick up the tab for necessary renovations so that a disabled person can access a bathroom, shower or bedroom.

    There are all kinds of disability equipment available..raised toilet seats, transfer boards, shower chairs, grip bars, lifts, the list is very long of assistive aids already invented.

    I understand that right now he cannot even get into the bathroom, yet that can be taken care of by getting in touch with the folks in your state who do that work all the time for disabled renters..they know the law and explain it to landlords, and also know the funding sources. In the meantime, a simple bedside commode with a detachable arm, a raised seat and a transfer board is what many folks normally work with while they are waiting for the bathroom to be handicap accessible. His Physical or Occupational therapist is the best resource for all of that.
     
  12. Jan Doling

    Jan Doling Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,898
    Joined:
    May 21, 2004
    Location:
    Zone 9b
    I would look into an extension of the kitchen sink spayer so he can be hosed off over a wash tub....an outdoor shower can be purchased at Home Depot or Lowes to hook up to a garden hose in summer months...also a Sun Shower could be hung from it for spring and fall. Do they have a garage, deck or porch he could convert for bathing and the sawdust toilet?
     
  13. FolioMark

    FolioMark In Remembrance

    Messages:
    1,436
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    illinois but i have a homestead building in missou
    The simplest solution for bathing would be to install a floor drain in the bathroom as long as its a tiled floor and walls. Just sit over the floor drain in his wheelchair or on an old metal chair and hose him down. You could even rig up an outside shower with some lattice screens for privacy and a slatted deck floor and run a hose from a tap attached to the hot water line. Might be a bit brisk during winter in Indiana, but most of the year it would be fine. As to the toilet, a variation of the sawdust toilet would work just fine. When I first bought my place in Missouri, I made a wide wooden bench supported between two trees that was the same height as the seat of my wheelchair. I put a back board on it as well for comfort and safety and cut a potty hole in the bench seat. I made the seat a good 2 feet wide and about 6 feet long so there was room to get on and off and lean over to either side so I could tidy things up at the end. :rolleyes: Just put a bucket under it and we were in business. Sawdust toilet will work fine as long as you install the bucket in a good wide seat. Imagine a park bench made into a potty seat and you got the idea. Good luck with it.