I need a submersible well pump..any suggestions?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Guest Too, Aug 29, 2005.

  1. Guest Too

    Guest Too Active Member

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    I just found out that an old well that's on my 5 acres actually has water in it. I put a well bucket down it and it bottoms out at 255 foot. You hit water at 118 feet. I'd like to put a pump in and see if it'll make enough water to water my garden and such. I have no idea about good pump brands or how to set them up. My dad always had black poly pipe in his well, but the local driller puts down joints of PVC screwed together. Anyway, any information you have on the subject would be appreciated. Thanks!
     
  2. MaryNY

    MaryNY Well-Known Member

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    You might want to check out "solar well pumps". If you put that into the Google search engine you will probably learn more than you want to about them. Good luck.

    MaryNY
     

  3. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    I find that the submersible pumps all have the same electic motor brand if they are made here. The only difference that I see is that the body coupling to the pump can be made from various materials. A stainless steel housing pump connected via a plastic body to common electric motor can be purchased from Lowes or Home Depot for reasonable price. A 1/2 HP one should meet your needs. You will want to use schedule 80 PVC or heavy wall roll piping as it will be supporting the weight of the pump. I used to buy the more expensive Jacoussi or Gould pumps but I am now convinced they do not last any longer than the others. No one seems to service the motor/pump anymore so when they break the entire mechanism is a throwaway. None of them can tolerate a lightning hit so if it is out of warranty then you are going to shoulder the expense so again I go for the less expensive units.
     
  4. Guest Too

    Guest Too Active Member

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    So do you prefer the PVC or the rolled pipe? I worry about cross threading the joints of pipe and the rolled pipe was always to to drag while you were pulling it out of the well. /shrug
     
  5. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Since I work alone i can handle the PVC lengths better. I use metal couplings and I have not had a cross threading problem. I have fabricated a fixture that I secure to the well casing. This fixture sticks up in the air about 12 plus feet above the casing and has an "eye" that surrounds the pipe to hold it vertically while I thread or unthread the individual lengths. I also have a pair of modified visegrips that have jaws made from angle iron that I use to clamp around underneath the couplings. The jaws prevent the PVC from rotating and they support the portion remaining in the well as I work the section above the joint. Regardless of what you use, take care to be safe and to avoid dropping the rig back into the well. Cutting a V into a 2x4 and then having a top piece that bolts to the 2x4 makes a simple tool that will support pipe and pump without someone having to hold it. The pump will get heavy and the task is tiresome otherwise.
     
  6. Guest Too

    Guest Too Active Member

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    I remember the tiresome part from helping dad. I haven't checked the price of PVC but the black pipe was $100 for 300 feet. I bet the sch 80 is a lot higher than that. I'll have to invite friends and family over to help me set it. ;) Pay back time for them.