I know I'm probably over reacting, but...

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by IwannaFarm, Jul 16, 2005.

  1. IwannaFarm

    IwannaFarm Well-Known Member

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    We went to a farm museum today, one that has Jerseys, sheep and horses, etc. As some of you know, we are currently stuck in a little 4 room apartment, unable to have any animals (besides our cat) or garden or even a yard. Doesn't look hopeful that we'll get any land or anything for a while, so the desire for homesteading, animals and farming can get pretty painful sometimes.

    well, just the same, we went with the kids, who had a ball. I ended up getting, well, HUGGED by 2 different cows and a horse, along with several cow-kisses from a couple of calves. I understand that they're just friendly cuz they're used to people and all, but when a cow just randomly puts her head on your shoulder... come on, why wouldn't I feel privaleged??!!

    It made me feel that maybe this odd, crazy farming idea of mine isn't so crazy after all. Maybe I do have something about me, some part of me that feels a kinship with animals, and maybe...just maybe...they see it.

    I know, I know, I'm nuts.. but thanks for listening just the same...

    P.S. We did buy a membership to that museum...so now I can go anytime I want!
     
  2. AngieM2

    AngieM2 Big Front Porch advocate

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    Those cows are going to be so glad to see you, if they liked you enough to put their head on your shoulder.

    Just keep on keeping on and one day, you'll get your dream.... or at least enough of it to be satisfied.

    Good to know you can get a membership and keep on going.

    Angie
     

  3. Mid Tn Mama

    Mid Tn Mama Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You aren't strange. It's true that animals, like people like certain ones more than others. I've seen that with all our animals and it doesn't have anything to do with which family member does the feeding.

    Except Chickens--they don't seem to care one way or the other--just get the food.
     
  4. IwannaFarm

    IwannaFarm Well-Known Member

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    Well one of the volunteers put it quite aptly - "I've always considered it an honor when an animal trusts you - a perfect stranger - like that! After all, it shows they know you respect them."

    He put it just right, and I realized that was how I was raised - to respect them and try to understand what they were saying to you. A certain way of flipping the head or the tail, the way an ear is cocked, or the way they walk toward you... it all means something different. And they seem to understand when a person - even a stranger - knows how to speak their language.
     
  5. MaryNY

    MaryNY Well-Known Member

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    It sure does sound like those critters took to you, Iwanna. Do you work outside your home? If not, maybe you could look around (even if they aren't advertising for help) and find a veterinarian's office where you could work on Sat. mornings and maybe one night a week or something like that -- walking the dogs, feeding animals, etc. If it were a large animal vet (instead of small pets), so much the better. Then maybe you could stick that little bit of extra income away each week/month and start a "fund" for your farm. Maybe you could go work at the place you were visiting, since you and the animals there have such an affinity for each other. Perhaps, you could speak to the person who said the animals liked you about it? Anyway, those were just a few ideas, I had.

    Now, here's some ideas from someone we all are aware knows what she's talking about.

    I posted elsewhere that I had been to the 50th Anniversary thing at Lehman's last weekend to see the store and hear Carla speak. Well, in one of her talks she gave an example of how a couple, stuck in an apartment, might be able to break free and get some land much sooner than they thought, and I don't think she'd mind my sharing the general idea of what she had to say. Some of it is pretty gritty, but it may give you some ideas.

    The premise of her tale is a couple, with small children, living in an apartment and wanting to get land; he is in a minimum paying job and she is a stay at home mother; and they spend every penny he makes on rent, utilities, food, etc. and can manage to save nothing each month - so where are they going to get any extra money for downpayments on land, etc.?

    Carla says first you have to get rid of your pride and your vanity. In other words, you have to be able to ask for help and some of what you may have to do to achieve your goal may not be pretty. Her thought is that you get rid of the rent and the utilities by either asking some relatives or friends if you can move in with them (their garage, perhaps?) or into their backyard (in a tent or cheap old used travel trailer that is not good for going over the road any longer). You pay the relatives/friends a few dollars for letting you do this (under $100 a month) and put all the rest of the money you would have spent on rent AND utilities into your "farm fund." (I told you some of it was gritty!)

    She also say to sell everything you don't absolutely need, and to put all the rest of it in a storage facility. She also says pay off all your credit cards, get a debit card if you need a card at all, and pay cash for everything else. That way once your house is built, you will owe little or nothing on it.

    Now, if you're living in a tent, the first thing you may want to do is get that travel trailer that is no longer road-worthy and put that in the relatives/friends backyard. Then you start saving up your farm fund.

    Even if you're only saving $500 a month, it would only take a few months to save up the downpayment on a a 5-10 acre piece of land - and if it had no buildings on it, you tow that little travel trailer there somehow (on a flatbed truck?), and move onto your very own land and start to build your house. If the land does have some sort of building on it, and you can make it habitable, you move into that and sell the trailer. Now you will be paying the $100 you were paying to the relatives/friends for rent as part of your mortgage and maybe more depending on prices, but it will still be less than your rent and utilities were when you started out.

    THEN, you take the extra money you had been saving for your land and start putting it into your house each month. You need a cellar dug and that will cost $1,000 -- so you save up $1,000 and you get it dug. You will need some kind of concrete blocks or bricks or something to make the cellar walls and that will cost $1,000, so you save up until you can pay cash for that, and so on until over a period of years - years that you might have been stuck in an apartment -- you get the house built.

    In the meantime, if it's absolutely necessary to have something larger to live in than the travel trailer, you get the least expensive old used mobile you can and put that on the land. Then you save up again and start with digging the cellar for the house, etc.

    I probably didn't explain this nearly as well as Carla does, but hope you get the general idea, at least. If you get a chance to hear her speak somewhere near where you live, you should go listen to her, as she has some amazing ideas. If you want to check her speaking schedule, you can check it out on her website at www.carlaemery.com

    Good luck!

    MaryNY
     
  6. IwannaFarm

    IwannaFarm Well-Known Member

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    yeah I read something similar in her book, but I doubt my DH would go for it - he's more of a city-boy than I am (tho I'm slowly converting him...very, very slowly... he's now not so against me having chickens...).

    At any rate, the land prices in our area are horrible... $20,000 MINIMUM for 2 acres depending on the exact location. I rarely see less than $20K.
    DH does have a good paying job, and he doesn't want to live an hour away from it. he really wants to be 45 minutes or less.

    Let's just say DH is VERY VERY picky... I've mentioned the idea to him several times, and his reply is usually "I won't have my boys living in a shack!!" or something similar.

    It's hard because we seem unable to save money, have no family in this area.
    Tough to explain, I guess.
     
  7. AngieM2

    AngieM2 Big Front Porch advocate

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    The premise of moving in with family and saving, etc then get the farm.

    Sounds good, but I'm put off a bit by it.
    Reason - -
    a good friend here was renting a house, and talking all the time of getting some land, etc. She was canning and had a few chickens where she was, making baby steps towards the farm she really wanted.

    Her hubby is a minimum wage earner, she homeschooled two little girls.
    She hosted one of these meetings and was so enthusiastic. She looked for teepee, yurts, busses, old travel trailers. Went to look at MO/Ark land and loved it. So they moved in with her mother....

    Since that time, she stopped coming in HT, she stopped talking about a farm, and totally lost her dream. Last I heard she was in a lower, rough class neighborhood in the big city she's in.... and I don't know what else.

    She has not been on this forum for a long while and I cannot find her anywhere else on the internet at this time, under that old name.

    So, I'd highly suggest to dream, and save what you can - but don't jump off the deep end as suggested. At least use some sense that use to be called common.

    Just my thoughts on the above recommendation.

    Angie
     
  8. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    This is starting to sound like DH and I many years ago, though we didn't have children then. It was DH who wouldn't live in a shack!

    It DOES take some time. Lets see, things I have learned over the years.....

    Look at DH's job on a map, and follow a major road out to a less developed area. Because it IS a major road, it makes for a much easier commute, and you can get farther out. In other words, if 30 minutes on an interstate will get you to a less developed area, prices might be less than 30 minutes on small roads. Don't go by miles, go by commute time.

    Once you get out to a less develped area, check out the prices in the area. We ended up with a 15 year old house on an acre of land for what a city house would have cost. We cannot raise large animals, but I have bees, chickens, blackberries, a home made greenhouse, a garden, fruit trees, christmas trees, and so forth. HUD gave us the loan on the house, they often do for first-time buyers. They only wanted a $1,500 down payment for a $75,000 house, and the monthly payment was only a little more than the rent. Remember that you will be paying property taxes, of course, and the $1,500 down payment WAS 15 years ago. It might have gone up.

    Once you get to what your DH would consider a reasonable commute, check out the land prices in that area. Since the houses are farther out, they MIGHT be cheaper!......but not if you live in a large city. There ARE no cheaper places in San Jose, for example. There just.....aren't. But, there might be in your community.

    Take stock on what money you control: grocery money for example. Learn to spend just a LITTLE less, and set aside that money for homesteading-type projects.

    For example, do you have a porch where you could have a pot of cucumbers? Use the little money you saved from more from-scratch cooking, buy a container at a yard sale for pennies, check it for drainage, fill it with bought potting soil and raise something. Credit yourself with the money for the veggies, of course, and set that aside in your stash. You won't earn much from veggies in pots, but you gain EXPERIENCE! and SOME cash!

    If you wish, start taking care of a child the same age as one of your kids, let them play and enjoy themselves, and after you deduct the cost of the childs snacks, add the profit to your homesteading stash.

    Keep the money separate, if you don't have a savings account start it with homesteading money. And, if you DO decide to take on a day-care child, let your husband know that you are saving money for a downpayment on a place for the family, so he is behind you.

    Do NOT talk about a downpayment if you are just putting aside money you have saved, until you get a couple of hundred. For some reason, some folks have to be SHOWN that spending less will add to the bank account! So, show him you can do it, if you can, and THEN tell him you would like to save up for a down payment for a place of your own! And, be a little vague about the ideal size of the back yard, you hear? At least for a little while! After he is committed to the idea of a house, then you might mention that *IF* you can afford a house with an acreage it would be a good thing. But that isn't set in stone.

    If you can save the down payment, and the payments are the same as your rent, why not?

    Ways to spend less.

    Start by figuring out what you generally spend on groceries. Then, anything less you spend is for your flower pots, your hanging baskets of chives and lettuce, or any OTHER homesteading endevor.

    Bake more from scratch. use all of your leftovers if you can: shepherds pie is simply leftovers in a cassarole dish with biscuits on top. Pizza is rolled out bread dough with leftovers and cheese and ragu on top. Bake at the hottest setting for a crisper crust.

    Don't throw away what you can re-use (ziplock bags and such come to mind). See if there is a freecycle in your area: you can get free stuff for hauling it away.

    Also, it sounds like what you really love is large animals. That makes things harder, 'cause you can raise a LOT in a standard back yard, but not cattle! A garden, a home made greenhouse, possibly rabbits, whatever. But, cattle won't be allowed. If it wasn't for the large animals bit, you might be able to find homesteading happiness in suburbia. As it is, you are going to have to be very thoughtfull.

    By the way, can you get on with the museum staff? Fun and educational both!

    You know, the really sneaky thing about having kids is, as soon as you get $100 saved, you WILL see something that is ABSOLUTELY wonderfull for the kids that costs.....$100. TRUST me on this! :rolleyes: It NEVER fails!

    But, don't spend it ALL on the kids, y'hear? :nono:
     
  9. IwannaFarm

    IwannaFarm Well-Known Member

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    Well, when it comes to saving money and penny pinching, I come from a long line of traditional New Englander Pennypinchers. However, DH comes from a line of spenders...which is why we had to declare bankruptcy and foreclose on our house a couple years ago. Fun Fun... and that is why we are having trouble with househunting - plenty of places in our range if you want manufactured, but we don't qualify. Can't grow anything on the porch - it's in our lease not to use it since we live above 2 businesses.

    Dh is an exceedingly picky man - doesn't want too populated, but not too rural... doesn't want to live near rednecks or something... it's weird. His taste in houses is much mroe than what we can afford and he gets stubborn and overprotective of his boys. He also seems to be set on staying in this school system - something that is virtually impossible, especially with our(my) dream in mind.

    My dream - and parts of it DH agrees with, many he's uncertain of (not 'against' just isnt sure yet) is to have 5 acres, partly cleared, part wooded, with a nice little 3 BR and a yard for the kids - and have a family milk cow, chickens, maybe rabbits or goats or Narangassett Turkeys and Muscovy ducks... a little bit of everything - I don't desire a horse, but admit they're beautiful animals. Of course a nice big veggie garden and a little orchard, too.

    Tough to describe our situation, and I don't want to give too many overpersonal details.

    But it seems we are physically incapable of saving money - anytime we save some, some crisis comes up and it's gone. Frustrating. Just when we had some, car needed work to pass inspection.
     
  10. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    CERTAINLY you should not give out too much info! :cowboy: IF you put too much on the net, somebody may suspect who you really are, and just like THAT! your secret identity may be TOTALLY blown! :lonergr:

    I am making a joke of it, but I am serious. There ARE nuts on the web.

    So, DH wants a place in the school district, a stick house, city neighbors, and a city home. And, your credit is shaky.

    Well, THAT makes it harder! :stars:

    Well, you can STILL perhaps volenteer at the museum. And, does your city have a thing where you can rent a garden plot in a community garden?
     
  11. mulliganbush

    mulliganbush Well-Known Member

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    It sounds as if the first step here is some good, tough marriage counseling, including budgeting and financial planning. You and your husband don't agree on some very fundamental things and it isn't going to get better. Not to be a downer, but not only won't the parts you do agree on happen unless some changes are made, but your financial situation will continue to deteriorate.

    I originally wrote much more on this post, but deleted it because it sounded too critical and disapproving. I guess the one thing I would say is that must be some school system if your husband thinks it's worth keeping his three boys in a four-room apartment where you can't even grow a tomato on the porch.

    Get that counseling.

    Ray
     
  12. Shepherd

    Shepherd Well-Known Member

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    Quite frankly, we don't have any extra buildings, nor do we have the money to pay for the help, but we have 120 acres and would seriously consider having someone do that here, help out with chores, etc. I just don't know how you get in contact with people who are willing to do something like that. I'm sure they're out there though.

    There ARE people with a gift with animals and it sounds like you are one, Iwanna. And I will say EVEN chickens can be tamed enough to get excited when they see you, and will allow you to pick them up. I've had a couple that I tamed who would come up to me whenever I'd call their name and hold my hand out, allowing me to slip my hand under their belly and lift them up. It's harder when they're tame and it's time to butcher them, so I have tried not to do that with them all, but it's much easier if they get out when they'll come to you, rather than running away. So I get them used to being handled when they're little.

    But I have to agree with Ray (Mulliganbush), you have deeper problems with your husband not being responsible about finances and not taking your wishes into consideration very seriously. It does sound like some serious heart to heart conversations and/or counseling is in order.

    On a lighter side, I wanted to move back to the country for YEARS and my DH would not hear of it. Finally he gave in and said "If you can find a house in the country that's only a couple miles out of the city, it's a ranch home (which was our preference), and brick (another preference we had)... I'll consider it." I did! Two miles south of the city - a dream house! Then we argued about being able to afford it until I explained the unit in the duplex we owned and lived in would be rented out, giving us that much more income per month and helping us make our payment. He finally gave in after a lot of prayer and once we moved, he fell in love with it.

    Later we found THIS place 35 miles further south (45 minute commute to work for us) and we both knew without a doubt this was the place for us. We sold that house with 5 acres for a little more than we ended up paying for this (a newer more efficient berm home) and got 40 acres to boot!

    I really wish you well Iwanna. Keep us posted.
     
  13. Kygardengal

    Kygardengal Well-Known Member

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    Being married to a "city feller"...I can relate...but let me tell you what I have learned from this experience.

    When my DH and I met, we were both living in the city. He knew when he married me that I loved the country but he didn't realize "how much" I loved the country. After a while, I was so miserable in the city and DH was soooo confused. We moved to a smaller town and that just proved to be nothing but a "teaser" for me...I would drive out the country roads by my self and just cry...yearning for the homesteading life.
    I wondered if I would be able to stay married to this guy. I was so torn because he just couldn't imagine anyone wanting to live way out there...how inconvenient ! ! ! This went on for 10 years...I kept trying to change him....I tried to turn him into someone that he is not. I talked about nothing but homesteading...and the whole 9 yards of it....What I had actually did was totally overwhelm him...In other words it was just too drastic a change for him. He is very sweet and he tried to please me, but he just couldn't do it. I was refusing to compromise. I wanted it all....I was willing to live in a tent if need be and he would NEVER do that. I had to realize that it was so totally unfair to expect this man to "change" to accomodate me. I had a choice, I could either compromise or leave him....I chose to keep him...I had to realize that the homesteading dream was "MY" dream and not his....there are several others here on this board in the same situation and you may be one of us.

    After many years of dreaming, I took a 2nd job and saved all of that money til I had a down payment to buy my 18 acres, 30 minutes away. I had to do this by myself. I went to the bank, I make the payments and my name is on the deed. DH likes to visit the place but he thinks it is too far out and too far a comute to his job. We just bought a new house in town, in a new subdivision. I had to compromise.....and you may have to also...at least for now.....

    BUT>>>Don't give up hope
    If your DH is looking at you as though you are out of your mind, it's probably because he is so over whelmed. The total homesteading dream is very freightening to a city guy. It is even "un-imagineable"....you will have to take this very slowly.

    There is a lot you can do if you live in an apartment. For starters...... live frugally, don't waste anything, cook from scratch, sew, bake bread, make soap, crochet, knit, learn to quilt, learn to spin wool, work on some crafts to sell, make your own cosmetics, babysit, grow herbs on a window sill, buy from a farmer's market, can and freeze for the winter, build up a food supply for the winter.....the list is endless...... Get creative.....I did all of these things from an apartment in the city.

    Homesteading is a frame of mind, not a location....

    I know this is hard to swallow but you may have to just

    "Bloom where you are planted" at least for the time being....
     
  14. IwannaFarm

    IwannaFarm Well-Known Member

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    I am very sure I didn't express myself very well in regards to my husband.

    My husband is a wonderful man. We've had many money problems, and still do - seems we just have rotten luck. It's not fun, but we're learning - God's not through teaching us yet.

    At first, my DH looked like I was nuts. He thought "Organic" meant "Fulla bugs". He thought many things the usual city person might about country life.
    But he loves me enough to let me dream and let me have that dream if we can.

    Here's why it works.
    We both want to live in the country. We both desire that, but our son's learning problems, etc make things hard - we're afraid of going somewhere where the school system is rotten. At any rate, liek I said we're both very much desiring the country, and a good piece of land. My wonderful DH has even looked a lot at places with outbuildings 'just in case we ever get animals'. He has specifically told me that while he is UNCERTAIN (I didn't say against - he admits he doesn't know much about these things) he wants me to be happy and do what I want. He also says in these very odd, crazy political times it would be a comfort to know we can be somewhat self sufficient.

    I didn't start this thread to bash my husband. I regret if that's what you all thought I was doing. I started this thread because I've had a dream most would consider unusual - having a farm - and even I thought I might be nuts, until I went to a little Farm Museum and got Kissed by two calves, hugs from two cows and a hug and kiss from a horse. I started to think perhaps I am not as crazy as I thought, that maybe I could really do this...keep farm animals and care for them every day.

    That was the point of this thread. NOT bashing my husband who just hasn't known what Country is until he met me.
     
  15. Kygardengal

    Kygardengal Well-Known Member

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    Don't take this as bashing......just that sometimes a spouse may not completely understand the other, that is all. Most all of us want the whole picture. Sometimes we get it and sometimes it just takes a long time. We have all had "rotten luck" at times. No, it is not crazy. I am glad you seem to have "a way" with animals....that is great....in what ways do you see yourself progressing toward your dream? Tell us a little more about this....
    Your DH sounds very supportive and that is good. Mine is very supportive also, just doesn't want this for himself. I know that if it weren't for "my dream", he would never have any interest in living this life style.....
     
  16. IwannaFarm

    IwannaFarm Well-Known Member

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    That's exactly right, thank you. My wonderful husband has changed over the past few. He first thought I was nuts, then I began talking about things around him, even if he wasn't interested "Oh, I was reading on Muscovy Ducks today...Oh I read about Cows.." and he would ask questions.

    And he has said that if we can afford it, we can have animals, but he won't be involved, that it will strictly be 'my' venture, and that's fine. Though the way he's going I wouldn't be surprised if one day I found him out feeding them or soemthing.

    I thought I knew who I was, and so did he when we first married. Than *A dramatic chord is struck* WE HAD KIDS!! Now, it seems we don't know who we are at all. Well, I didn't until I began this country-lifestyle journey. Now I understand who I am - and it's not a fashionable, carreer-type person like many I know. I'm a country girl! I've always been a country girl! And I want all the things associated with that - animals, gardens, canning, sewing...

    But DH gets overwhelmed with all the new ideas and all the new things I'm learning. He's learning right along with me, though. I've caught him buying organic stuff, unbleached paper towels and wanting to go to the co-op. He makes comments on breeds of chickens and wondered if we should have ducks, too (his Mom likes ducks) and confessed he thought it would be great to have thanksgiving turkeys.

    And of course, he's especially interested in anything that could become an income for me - canning, sewing, baking...selling produce at the Farmer's Market, etc.

    He's sat through countless odd loaves of bread while I've learned, drank tons of homemade lemonade and iced tea and listened to my soapmaking endeavors.

    If I had to choose between farming and my husband, I'd choose my husband. Yes, I would give it all up for him if I had to. fortunately, it looks liek I'll be able to hang on to both of them. :)
     
  17. Kygardengal

    Kygardengal Well-Known Member

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    I am really glad to hear this from you.....this is wonderful....It is soooo amazing when you finally "find" who you are deep inside....congratuations on finding yourself.....this is what I believe is the biggest problem a lot of people have....I knew I was a country girl as I grew up that way....I just got away from it and "thought" I wasn't one....There came a point in my life when I couldn't deny it at all....I just totally "over whemed" my poor DH....he just didn't know what had happened to his DW....LOL....All of this "constant" and I mean "constant" talk of chickens and cows and land and living far away from people and gardens and self-sufficency etc. etc.....was just too much for him. He was sooo supportive and really tried to make it happen for "ME"..
    and it just didn't work out that way...It took some soul searching on my part to come to the conclusions that I came up with...and when I realized that this was "MY" dream and how un-fair it would be to him....I knew what I had to do....I remember when I finally told him face to face that it was ok...that I had decided to compromise. He was so happy...so relieved.....Sometimes a spouse loves you so very much and want so very much to make you happy that they "put aside" their own dreams....that isn't good....It sounds to me like maybe your DH is coming around....wonderful.....It's just that if he doesn't "transform" completely to your ideas....(and I hope he does) that not all is lost....you can still have your dream....

    Now....back on subject....I would spend a lot of time at this museum.....Maybe you could get a job there, or do some volunteer work....
    I volunteered to help a friend who has a dairy....they were short handed one summer and I went out to help....was great fun....had a blast...learned a lot..
    Let us know how this goes....ok?
     
  18. crystalniche

    crystalniche Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Connecticut
    A fairly easy way to save is to put all "found money" into a jar or kitty someplace and never, ever touch it and for Gosh sakes----don't tell your husband that you have it! If it is in change that makes it easier to keep it because it is a pain to have to count out change at the gas station or store. I did this for about 2 years, kept it in an old restaurant mayonnaise jar in the closet. After it was full up I saved up another jar but a smaller one. We had an emergency so I took it out and gave it to him. Big relief to have that money sitting there when we needed it. He never knew that I had it. Know how much I had in those jars? Over $800!!! I didn't think I had all that much, maybe a couple hundred. We still save change but I don't have an outside income anymore so it is harder for me. I only do eBay right now and most of that income goes into paypal where he can check on how much is there. One thing I do is start using coupons and take the money that you save and put it away. Also I will clean out the chairs in the living room and save that change too. It is surprising just how much change falls out of DS's pocket as he is sitting there! Wouldn't be long until you have enough for a down payment on something you both can live with. I am a firm believer that all women should have a bit of cash put away in case of emergencies. A few dollars to begin with then building up to maybe 1,000 or more. I've seen things happen time and time again where something happened and the woman was left without anything but her children! What a terrible spot to be in. Start with trying to save enough for a phone call home then work up to bus fare then more. The security of having bit of money to fall back on is very well worth the effort of saving this way. Could make your down payment on your dream home someday.
     
  19. crystalniche

    crystalniche Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    880
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2005
    Location:
    Connecticut
    I should tell you that I am a mail carrier but I work for my husband so get no income of my own from it. It is his job and I am his unpaid helper! I know it sounds unfair and it is. But it does work for us. I didn't mention this in my last post.
     
  20. IwannaFarm

    IwannaFarm Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    155
    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Location:
    New England
    I think one of DH's concerns is cute - he's afraid I'll get in over my head - so he made a deal with me - once we get our own home, if I can keep a garden alive and producing for over a year (or season...whatever) THEN he will allow me animals. I said "But animals are so much easier for me!" and he said "I know, this way if I see you tending a garden regularly and caring for it, I can have confidence that you can handle animals!"

    I know I should be 'squirrelling away' a bit here and there. Don't know why I'm not doing it more often, but I should. I am constantly finding change here and there. I think y'all are right (I'm from new england, we don't use the term 'y'all' but I'll borrow it for now) I should start doing that... I've got an old 2 lb coffee can I am using, but I'm also going to be emptying out a big vinegar jug soon... I'll start doing that right away.

    *Sigh* this means I have to not go to the thrift store quite so much, that's where all the spare change is going!!! I love it there...LOLOL