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Shut the front door!
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*BIG deep sigh*

I have no wood.

In years past, I had access to a truck and trailer and would go to my aunts property and collect all the wood I could haul. I do not have a truck or trailer, or access to that property any more......

If I were to buy wood, and have someone deliver it.....

What's good wood? How will I know?
Which is bigger, a rick or a cord?
What's the difference between a rick and a cord?
What's a 'good price' for wood??

http://indianapolis.craigslist.org/grd/4719355771.html
Is this a good deal?

Thanks for your help!!
 

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Sorry about the wood LZ5 (especially after a stupid answer I just gave on the ? thread). In Georgia, wood sales are supposed to be by the cord, which is a standard volume of 128 cubic feet (4x4x8). Note that a face cord may not be a full cord, in case you see an ad selling face cords. Not sure if a rick has any standard measure or specification. In our area in order of quality the best firewood is generally: hickory, white oak, red oak, and red maple. Ash is good firewood but seems rare around here now. Dry wood has a hollow sound when you strike two pieces together while wet wood just kinda' thuds. You'll get lots more heat and less creosote buildup if you can find well seasoned firewood.

Good luck in your search and stay warm.
 

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A face cord is generally 4'×8'×16" although some people will cut logs 14" or even 12" and try to charge the same. It is worth bringing a tape measure or even a stick snapped to the right length.
 

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Have a Great Day!
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An alternative to burning logs/wood, is the compressed wood shavings-'Eco-Brick'-compressed hardwood firewood. A couple of my friends have used this product in the past, and suggested I try it this fall( it had been really wet/raining-my firewood was damp). so I stopped at our local home center(Do-It), and they had packages of Eco-Brick for $2.75 per package-I bought 10 packs. It was dry, it burned hot, was very clean-handling/transporting. I would give this a try -even read the reviews on this product-I think You would be surprised!

I have always gathered my own firewood. If You have to buy, a cord(4'/4'/8'), is the only true standard measurement-should cost between$100-$200. Many people sell 'ricks'(not a standard), approx 4'/8'/the length of the log-should cost between $50-$75, or by the pick-up load-around $100-small pick up?. You want seasoned hardwood(in Indiana)-oak needs to dry at least 12 months from cutting, hickory,and maple cure faster. Ash is very low moisture-and can be burned the day you cut/split it. I would suggest asking someone local, who burns(that You know/trust?), to point You to a good supplier.
Do You want wood for heating?, back-up/emergency, are You going to burn in a fireplace, woodburner? Open fireplaces, are not very efficient heating options-but an option nonetheless -they usually suck a lot of the 'heat', up the chimney.
When looking at potential firewood-You can determine a lot by the cut ends-cracked/splitting, the color-faded grey, the smell-fresh cut will smell like 'wood'-seasoned, does not have as much of a smell. And as RW has said, seasoned wood, sounds like like a ball bat-"hollow sound".
There is a lot more, I am sure I am not covering, I hope this helps Laura?
 

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To answer your question about if the advertised trailer of wood is a good deal or not. Its not a great deal but its not real bad either considering they are going to deliver it. Mostly depends on what species it is. Hard wood of course should cost more, plus one year of seasoning in not enough for most species if you want top BTU's out of it. 3 years seasoned is the best for heat output for wet woods like Oak but few folks can get that far ahead of the burn season. If you can get 18 month seasoned wood and keep it covered when you get it that seems to be about the best your going to get from most folks. On average most wood suppliers only season 10-12 months, and a lot of your BTU's are lost boiling the water out of the wood before it can burn.
I like to burn Osage Orange, or Mulberry, as they are top BTU woods, but they require attention to burn safely as the heat output is nearly double of most softer woods. Then there is Hickory, Oaks, if seasoned right they are great firewood. Any fruit tree wood burns pretty good, and smells nice as well. Then most Maple species burn with a lot of flame for a pretty fire but most are considered soft woods and have lower BTU content. Stay away from and resinous woods like Pine, too much popping and resin, unless its kiln dried construction cutoffs. Pallet wood can be Ok if its seasoned one year, its so thin it dries out good.

Around here $250 a cord for 12 months seasoned Oak delivered is about normal. Make sure you know exactly how much wood you are getting in terms of a cord of wood, it can be a word game. A favorite trick is to sell 16-18" long logs in a 4' x 8' stand and call it a face cord. Not true, a honest face cord would be 24" x 4'x8'. You would be losing 6" off each log which is a 25% lose of what you think you are paying for.

Everyone here seems to be giving you good advice, I hope your wood procuring adventure goes well. maybe you could offer some labor hours helping someone that thas saws, trailers, and can deliver in exchange for time splitting and stacking some wood for them, it really is a good way to get some great excercise and be outdoor instead of at a gym!:thumb:
 

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Very Dairy
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If you had a truck to haul them, I'd suggest picking up free pallets. Get you a little girly electric chainsaw (or the real thing, if you're up for it! me, I like my electric saw) to buzz them up. Just watch out for the nails! :teehee:

We heat half the winter with the pallets I drag home, save the cordwood for the coldest winter nights.
 

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I don't know what you drive, but when I drove a station wagon, if I saw free wood by the side of the road, I would stop and load up the back of it. I do the same thing now that I have a pick up.

I have seen people on CL ask for free wood. I have seen people on CL advertise that they have wood for free. If you can find any wood for free, but don't have a way to pick it up, do you have any friends w/pickups that would go w/you for gas money?
 

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In Michigan, the law says firewood can only be sold by the full cord, but nobody does. Here, a "rick," a "rack", and a " pickup load" are all treated equally. About $50, or $60 delivered (delivered means dumped and not stacked).

Face cord, as mentioned above, means a 4' x 8' stack of arbitrary length.

Around here, the firewood "business" is full of knuckle heads- showing up drunk, not showing up, etc. If you find somebody good, hang on to him!
 

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Original recipe!
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Contact the local tree companies in your area.
We used to have them dump their dump trucks full of trees in our yard.
It was closer for them than the dump and it saved them the dump fee.
Because they knew we were using it to burn, they would cut the rounds to size.

It was awesome! And free!
 

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Any wood is good wood.

(pause for laughter to die down)

Most people would say cotton wood or pine are bad wood , but they light easy and make fast heat.
Oak makes LONG lasting heat for its size but it heavy.
Others are in between As long as the wood is dry the heavier it is the more heat in it.
Wet woods and the ever greens tend to throw a lot of tars and creosotes.
 

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Laura you might check in with a senior place, local store et c to see if they lead on firewood and who is trustworthy.
 
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