I hate squash vine borers.

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by nate77, Aug 26, 2017.

  1. nate77

    nate77 Well-Known Member

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    Anyone have an effective solution to squash vine borers?

    I've tried seven, I've tried moving my squash, this year, they've been worse than ever.

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  2. Belfrybat

    Belfrybat Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've not had much luck but some cut the vine open and remove the borers. I used to use neem oil or even sevin dust around the base, but be very careful when you put it as to not kill bees.

    Or switch to tromboncino squash. The stems are solid and the borers can't get in. Doesn't mean they are completely immune but much better than standard zucchini or yellow varieties. It's also a dual purpose -- eaten young like zucchini (but milder) or mature like butternut.
     
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  3. nate77

    nate77 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the tips.

    I've never heard of that tromboncino squash, it looks cool, I wonder how it tastes compared to zucchini, and yellow squash?
     
  4. geo in mi

    geo in mi Well-Known Member Supporter

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  5. Belfrybat

    Belfrybat Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Tromboncino tastes like a mild zucchini. I consider the taste about half-way between dark green zucchini and yellow. I like it because there are no seeds in the neck -- only in the bulbous part. And unlike zucchini the skin never goes bitter. The only thing I don't like is the space needed to grow it. But a trellis helps.
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  6. ticndig

    ticndig Well-Known Member

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    here's how I beat the squash borer ever time . Very effective and organic as well .
    buy a product called B.T and a hypodermic needle from a feed store , I get mine from TSC . take a finishing nail and make a hole in the stem a few inches above where the worm is thought to be . put needle in hole and give it a little shot of the BT . It kills caterpillars only and really works . the other poisons mentioned don't work because the worm is not in contact with it .
     
  7. nate77

    nate77 Well-Known Member

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  8. ticndig

    ticndig Well-Known Member

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    yes it saves the plant if you get the BT above the worm , I've done the surgery thing with mixed results . with Bt the plant lives on and produces like it should . If you see the crud at the base of the plant like in your pic treat right away . B.t does not store real well because it's a live bacteria so read up on it . important to not allow to freeze or get too hot .
     
  9. JawjaBoy

    JawjaBoy Cultured Redneck

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    I'm definitely gonna have to try this next year as I've had my squash killed off by vine borers the last few years. Thank you!
     
  10. Oxankle

    Oxankle Well-Known Member

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    Same problem here in Arkansas. First, I decided that I would grow only butternut, a winter squash with solid stem---great for storage but not for use on the table as summer squash. Then Paquebot told us that the squash bug does only one generation a year in his area and that he always planted late. I planted yellow squash in late July and am awash in beautiful straightneck squashes and will be until frost.
    Also, the local county agent here (Boone county, N. Arkansas) told us to spray the base of the squash, the stem and about two inches above the fork, with Sevin BEFORE the squash blooms. Did not work well for me as rain washed the stuff off and I would not spray after the squash bloomed.
     
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  11. ticndig

    ticndig Well-Known Member

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    you're welcome , look for frass where the worms drilled in , inject 2'' or 3'' above that area , it works better than anything else I've tried ..