Homesteading Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,287 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
But, sometime they are my only solution. Case in point, the standard doorway height is 80 inches. All bifold doors that I have seen are 79 inches high, so there shouldn't be any problems. However, yesterday, I was hanging some louvered closet doors, only to find out that the doorway was only 77 inches high. I couldn't enlarge the doorway without cutting into the ceiling, so the only option was to take three inches off of the doors. I took 1 1/2 inches off of the top and bottom of the door, making short work of the dowels and pins that hold the side rails of the door on, meaning that the only thing holding the door together now at the top and bottom is glue. I then had to re-drill the holes for the hinge pivots and guide wheel, and since I don't have a seven foot drill press, all I could do was eyeball everything and hope it was all level and plumb enough in the end. As it turned out, I almost broke through the side at one point, but was able to stop in time. With a bit of jimmying and jiggering, the door was finally able to fit, and it opens and closes smoothly. How long it's going to hold together is another story entirely.

I didn't frame the door- it came with the house at that height. Orignally there were some heavy sliding MDF doors that were allways getting in the way, so I freecycled them years ago. I am pretty sure that they were cut down to fit.

I could have gone and ordered doors that were a custom height, but there would have been quite a bit of lead time required, and cost me considerably more than I was willing to spend. I could have cut down the door in the middle, and doweled it back together again, but for that, I would have needed a four foot drill press for the dowels, since you can't eyeball that kind of work.

There are probably ways that I could have done this door in a non-kluge manner (and without a large drill press). Solid bifold doors for example, might be an option for the future, but for now, unfortunately, I have to live with a kluge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
474 Posts
We use Kluge in Texas. Generally referring to a hastily thrown together solution that expresses no grace on the part of the repairman. I am a kluger when its necessary.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top