I hate few things in life... but lazy...!

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Wingdo, May 26, 2006.

  1. Wingdo

    Wingdo Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Alright, I've got all the "spring" hooves on the ground... and a pathetic spring it was, but I accept things like this as part of the game and move on.

    However, since most of the girls wintered pretty good, and came out nice and slick looking, they now don't want to go fend for themselves... at all! They would rather lie next to the barns, waiting for me to go by so they can scream at the top of their lungs, "Give me food," than to go out and browse for themselves!

    The biggest problem is my grandbabies love to slip the girls, and now most of the kids, little fists full of grain! Now I can't get any of them out of the feeder lot... and if I do finally manage to throw them out, they stand there screaming and/or waiting to get back in! There are 10 goats out there that are not only looking fat, but lazy and ill-mannered to all who go in the lot but me! With a little over 6 acres of brush, fescue, bluegrass, timothy, orchard grass, and a little burmuda in one of the summer pastures, they are still waiting for me to slop them a cup of grain each twice a day... and whatever they can squeeze out of the grandbabies!

    I'm thinking it might be time to stop graining most of these lazy animals all together, all but one doe which is still mighty thin in my opinion. Her I'd like to worm prior to sending her back into the world.

    What are your thoughts on the subject?
     
  2. joken

    joken Well-Known Member

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    We had to oil the hinges on the screen door so the goats couldn't hear us go outside. They are so spoiled and cry and cry for food. The goats have even turned my calves into beggars. They also have lots of forage but are fat and lazy. Ken
     

  3. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    take them on a walk through the pasture to get them out there, mine would follow me most anywhere weather i had food or not, and eat as they went,
    but yes i would cut way back on the grain, just give them hay and any brows they want, maybe a little grain now and then but not much
     
  4. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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    I couldn't make my front door quit sqeaking so I sold the last Nubian and now I have LaManchas. It's soooo quiet! Even if they are waiting to be fed, even if I am late, they stand silently and wait. It's a peaceful forest. It's a whole new farm! No more Nubians for me! And I am just about to sell all the Boers because i can hear them occasionally too, and they take away from the "quiet jungle"!

    So I am just venturing a guess that you do not have LaManchas. :)
     
  5. shereen

    shereen Well-Known Member

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    sorry about this
    i don't mean to go OT but i just couldn't resist
    i keep hearing everyone say that lamanchas are so quiet and calm and i don't know if it's just my girls (and boys for that matter) but oh my goodness- i would trade anyone of my unbelievably loud and aggressive lamanchas for a nubian any day!!!
    i worked at a goat farm for a year that had nubians and alpines and swore i would never get a nubian because they were so loud.
    so instead we bought saanens and lamanchas. the saanens are so super sweet and QUIET, but the lamanchas scream bloody murder all day.
    it's truly unbelievable!! the screams sound like they are dieing in pain or are being attacked by a dog.
    it's like nails on a chalkboard, it makes my blood curl!!
    when we first moved into our new house they would scream so loud the neighbors would call and ask it one of the goats were hurt or stuck in a fence. they didn't believe me and they to come and see for themselves (lucky for us they were goat lovers).

    i just had to comment on what texcountrywoman said because mine are completely nuts and just the opposite.
    hey tex- wanna trade???
    :help: :)
     
  6. Jcran

    Jcran Well-Known Member

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    NEVER, never, never bottle-feed a nubian cross if you plan on keeping it. My 6-year old's bottle baby Poppy, is absolutely AWFUL...she can hear a pin drop at 100 yards. The second we're out the door, she starts in!
     
  7. Wingdo

    Wingdo Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The only nubian out there is about 1/16th nubian... and yes, she's the loudest... by a mile! Most of the rest are boers to varying degrees... from full bloods to 3/4. There are also a couple of pygmy/boer crosses (my favorites), that have the size of the boer and the attitude of the pygmy (will follow you to the ends of the earth, not knowing why)!

    I'd take them on the walk but my woods hasn't got the wheel-chair ramp installed yet.

    Maybe if I got them another calf to follow around... they followed the last bunch like they had steaks in their pockets (of course they really did, but...)!

    I also wonder... if they had a Great Pyreneese, would that encourage them to travel a bit further?
     
  8. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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    Could you get the grandkids to feed them further out along the fenceline? Further from the barn where they HAVE to leave their loafing area? If they just get their treats away from the barn, perhaps that will encourage them to move around a bit.
     
  9. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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    Interesting Shereen,

    You may simply have a "loud" line of LaManchas. Are they purebred? If not, could they have Nubian in their background somewhere from crossbreeding? In one generation, the ears are usually gone when crossing with a LaMancha. Of course, you sound like an experienced goat person and you probably know this. I am just thinking out loud on why your LaMnachas are loud. I have never seen (or heard) loud LaManchas, just trying to figure out what's up with yours. Maybe it's just in your line of goats. I cull for personality as well as other traits. I notice if a LaMancha is even SLIGHTLY aggressive, even a smidge, a tad, and it is not in the breeding program no matter how nice.....and a LOUD LaMancha wouldn't be here at all, much less be bred. Perhaps you should cull those loud things and remove them from the LaManhca gene pool as LaManchas are known for being so mellow. Start keeping only the "less loud" babies. I definately understand that with dairy goats, that udders, conformation and dairiness are very important, but i will NOT have a goat that even slightly annoys me..life is too short and there are to many wonderful goats out there. :)
     
  10. Wingdo

    Wingdo Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ms. Diane R.

    We've tried that... first there's a disorganized stampede to the "new" spot, babies trampled in the dirt and the biggest the firstest in line, then there's heads over, under and through the fence, and then the kids laugh and send someone after more grain! Maybe I should use "their" birthday money to buy extra grain with and quit crying about the whole deal! That would probably end the mid-day snacks all together... lol!

    BY THE WAY:

    Does anyone know where an old fat guy could find himself a Great Pyr, that they don't want a billion dollars for, in the central KY. part of the world? I've been looking for almost a year now and find one of two things; Pups they want $500+ dollars for, or mixed pyrs that look and act more like over-grown retrievers and kill my chickens on sight (before I can work with the pups any at all)!

    Wing
     
  11. shereen

    shereen Well-Known Member

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    quote-
    but i will NOT have a goat that even slightly annoys me..

    i hear you on that, unfortunately we are just starting on building our herd and we have more yearlings than adults right now. those yearlings are TROUBLE!! i have noticed thet once they kid they are so much more calm
    we are starting a cheesemaking operation so i need all the milk i can get so culling right now is not an option-
    but when it is those ladies better look out!!!
    funny thought though- if i were to cull the goats that need it or the ones who gave me trouble, i would be down to 3 goats!!
    :shrug:

    and they are purebred, they have even taught the saanen boy to be noisy-
    these lamanchas make nubians sound like they are singing love songs
    hard to believe, but so true
     
  12. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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    I just sold all my purebred but no papers Great Pyrenees pups from $100-135. each.

    Reg. Pups go for quite a bit more. We didn't go for reg. pups orinally (the parents) because they are working dogs and we never know if we are going to lose one to a rattler or something of that nature. We kept a pup and he LOVES the goats. He is living in the kid goat yard now and stays with the herd 24/7. He thinks he is a goat.

    Hope you find a pup.

    Shereen: I understand about building a herd and not being able to cull. Fortunately, goats multiply so fast that you will be drowning in goats before you know it and can keep the ones you want. Good luck on your enterprise!
     
  13. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    I have nubians and nigerians. I have culled two nubians this year for being too noisy. They were awful - sounded like a woman yelling for help! My Dad, who was visiting, actally woke up, threw on his clothes to get our there - convinced someone needed help! They only do it when we are feeding. I have noticed that the younger girls are much more vocal - my older nubians don't do this at all. it was my two yearling nubians that got the boot this time. Of course, it helped that I brought in two adult nubians that MORE than replaced them - with the food they consumed and the milk they produce! ;)

    My nigerians definately have the 'attitude' you speak of. I think if I expected them to forage, they'd just lay down, roll over, and stick their feet in the air! Brats.

    niki
     
  14. shereen

    shereen Well-Known Member

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    wingdo,

    while i was ranting i forgot to mention that our goats follow our Pyrenees out to browse all day long. when he goes out they follow and when he comes running back so do they.
    today i took everyone out for a hike and was surprised they followed me out farther than we had ever been. while they were all stuffing their faces the Pyrenees got bored and decided to go back home and sure enough they all followed. sometimes it's great that they follow, but sometimes they follow him back before they're ready.
    overall i think he helps to get them out and i do like to see that they have become so aware of his presence that they stick by him for protection.

    check these out
    pups in ky for $100
    http://buyit.kentucky.com/findit/pets/adoption_for_sale/O396f14b.htm?query=great pyreneese

    these people had some in mid march for $150- you may want to see if they still have some or know someone who does
    http://zpg.ziply.com/zpg/us/ViewCA.php?idno=43307

    good luck
    i hope you find a pyreneese-they are so wonderful, i know i will never be with out one-even if i dont have critters
    shereen
     
  15. jill.costello

    jill.costello Well-Known Member

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    Oh, geez! I am laughing my rear off! I thought we were the only crazies that actually had to SNEAK around our own farm to trick the goats!!

    I have 4 AlpineX goats (2 does, and a yearling doeling with her wether brother). If they even THINK I'm AWAKE in the morning, they start to scream.

    Note- these are the healthiest goats you ever saw; they get 10 hours a day out on 9 acres of marvelous browse: cedar bushes, nettles, weeds, trees, bermuda grass, ponds with young plantlife, you name it. PLUS, they share a flake of Alfalfa and goat pellets at night in their pen.

    If the dogs bark in the early AM, I don't think, "please be quiet, dogs!".... I think "oh, lord, don't wake the GOATS!"!!!!

    (still giggling)...
     
  16. JR05

    JR05 Well-Known Member

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    You guys are sooo funny! I have Nubians (8) they very rarely are vocal. It's been the Toggenburgs and Boers that have been the loudest around here. Maybe the Nubies cannot get a word in because the others are yelling! Most of my girls are bottle babies and yes the 1st year or 2 they are very loud but they do settle down into the mellow stage. My only problem with Nubians is they are very bossy at dinner time and they other girls better not get in their way! By the way instead of grain have the grandkids feed the goats animal cookies or something else besides the grain, its cheaper and they don't gather waiting to be fed.

    jr05
     
  17. Wingdo

    Wingdo Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I really don't care a fly hoot about papers for a pyr... as long as it is obvious they aren't crossed with a poodle, or some such monster! I just want a dog that can grow old with me and my herd, and not eat either of us, nor my chickens obviously! I've even registered with "Petfinder," but about all they have are mixed pyrs with questionable breeding and a big adoption fee! I expect to pay $100-$150 for these overgrown baby-sitters, which seems reasonable enough, but when the "mutts" hit the $200 range it makes a fella ask himself, "For a questionable mutt that can eat more than another goat and require more care!"

    I contacted both places you suggested and have not heard back from them yet. Thanks!
     
  18. goatmarm

    goatmarm Well-Known Member

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    Our goats can be barn-potatoes too, especially on the hotter days, or in inclement weather. They will always follow us out into their woods to browse, but as soon as you head back, they race to the barn. It even seems that they hang around the barn MORE since we extended the pasture area. They love having access to brush, but want to have company. Occassionally they will be brave little goats and venture into the SPOOKY woods without the children or myself. I'm hoping that it just b/c they aren't used to going beyond a certain point(where the electric fence used to be), and need a bit of encouragement.
     
  19. boermommy

    boermommy Boer goats and teenagers

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    And I thought my goats were rotten! I have 26 Boers and Boer Crosses and they come running and crying any time they spot somebody in the yard. The fence is on three sides of the house so we've been reduced to sneaking in and out in order to avoid stampedes.

    They aren't what I consider loud. Just fussy.