I found out the breed of my calf

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by emke, May 24, 2005.

  1. emke

    emke Well-Known Member

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    My husband talked to the guy that we got the calf from. I don't know how to spell the one ½ so I will sound it out...

    ½ Shar-lay and ½ beefmaster. Will I be able to get milk out of her for our family?
     
  2. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Hi,
    It sounds as though your calf is half Charolais :)
    I know absolutely nothing about the Beefmaster but did have a friend who milked a Charolais/Hereford and got sufficient milk for her family of five and enough left over to feed a couple of grower pigs.

    I see no reason at all why you shouldn't milk her if that's what you want to do and she has a nice nature.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     

  3. 65284

    65284 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    She might milk quite well, IF she has the disposition for it. But, Beefmaster is a manufactured breed with quite a bit Brahma in them, and Charolais are not the most tractable breed around either. They can both be a little salty to say the least. She will almost certainly get huge, that, and her parentage of not especially good natured breeds, is a poor combination. This is especially true for an individual with little experience with cattle, who is wanting to milk. You may get lucky and have a real sweetheart, but if it were me I would look for a more dairy type breed.
     
  4. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    A lot of folk in Eastern Europe milk Charolais and as I understand, it the breed was built up by the French for triple purpose: beef, milk, and draft.

    As with any type of cattle, the more time you spend daily touching and otherwise interacting with the calf the gentler it will be. On the tractability scale used by ox men a Charolais ranks a 6 while a Jersey ranks an 8; this scale is 1-10 with a 10 being the most challenging.

    We used to have Charolais on some of the cattle farms I worked on when I was much younger, but they were wild field raised cows. The Charolais bulls were handled on a regular basis and they were gentle enough to lead on a halter and would stand for grooming.

    I never was around a Beefmaster.
     
  5. tim1253

    tim1253 Well-Known Member

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    A little bit of hope for you is that Beefmaster came from 1/4 milking shorthorn.

    Tim
    Knoxville, TN
     
  6. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    Charolais is one the highest milk producing beef breeds. You have nothing to lose by trying. Handle the calf as much as possible as it grows. Halter break it and lead it around, teach it to stay tied for a while, rub the udder every day, just anything you can think of to spend time with the calf and get her used to you doing things with her. You may not have any trouble milking her at all.
     
  7. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    I should have also said what others have - that among the beef breeds, the Charolais is one the highest yeilding milkers and as Haggis has pointed out, was orginally bred for milk, beef and draft.

    My experience with the cows was such that I found them quiet and easy to manage. The downside to them is that they are difficult calvers but as yours is a cross-bred that problem may not arise especially if you are able to put her back to a smaller breed of bull.

    We're all on the positive side so give it a go - I know I would because there is nothing to be lost by trying.

    Cheers
    Ronnie
     
  8. emke

    emke Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all your answers. This gives me hope. She is handled every day with us brushing her. We give her a little feed as we do this. She will now stand at her trough and hit the little container we hold her brush in and moo. I think she is wanting her feed and knows she will have to be rubbed and brushed to get it.

    She is halter broke and we still lead her around the yard freqently, so she stays used to it. She is still more gentle with me than my husband, but it may be that he holds her rope and I hold her halter. I also talk to her as I "walk" her.

    As to breeding her to a small type breed, we will talk to the farmer we got her from. Since he is going to let us "use" his bull, we can probably ask him to breed her to a smaller one. Since he does this for a living, I'm sure he will know all about it.

    Since I have never had milk right from a cow, meaning I have only drank store bought, I wouldn't know if it were salty. Tim, my husband, says he was raised on it and that it tastes different and takes getting used to.

    I guess we will give it a try. Thanks again.
     
  9. cloverfarm

    cloverfarm Well-Known Member

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    My experience with milk from teh farm was it tasted sweeter somehow. Depending on what the cows had been eating. I too was raised on store bougth milk. Skim because of my folks' weight and high cholesterol. Have to confess ... that's what I prefer because it's what I was raised with!

    Good luck!
    Ann