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I just don't see how using race to fight racism works.

Any group can hold a festival or market for any exclusive group that they choose, or at least they should be allowed to do so. But try putting up signs saying "English only spoken here" and see how far that gets you.
 

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Maybe it’s purpose isn’t to fight racism? Maybe it’s just to further their community?

They’re clearly allowing other races in who wants to shop, (white woman standing around in the first photo) they’re just featuring black vendors. Same way I’d expect out of some of the hispanic festivals/markets down in FL.
 

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Shazbot!
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Discussion Starter #23
Maybe it’s purpose isn’t to fight racism? Maybe it’s just to further their community?

They’re clearly allowing other races in who wants to shop, (white woman standing around in the first photo) they’re just featuring black vendors. Same way I’d expect out of some of the hispanic festivals/markets down in FL.
This has been my contention for years.

If the black community doesn't like Whitey getting rich off their money, then spend it with black owned business. If there isn't one, pool what resources they have and do whatever they can. Use any profits to expand or help thy neighbor get his idea going. Help each other prosper. Maybe Whitey will start spending his money to you at your profit instead of his if your product is superior.
 

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I prefer a black farmer's market over a farmer's black market. Who cares? Farmers markets are bigger here this year than ever around here but we have a few black farmers and everyone sells their produce in the same market.
 

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Shazbot!
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Discussion Starter #25
Great. Other communities are doing it differently.

Ain't America great?
 

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Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....?
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Black Farmers Market? Why throw race in my face?
https://blacklivesmatter.com/what-we-believe/
We are unapologetically Black in our positioning. In affirming that Black Lives Matter, we need not qualify our position. To love and desire freedom and justice for ourselves is a prerequisite for wanting the same for others.

We disrupt the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure requirement by supporting each other as extended families and “villages” that collectively care for one another, especially our children, to the degree that mothers, parents, and children are comfortable.
 

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I do think some of the signs are a bit much but it might work in areas with high black populations. I doubt it would go over well in most areas because such signs would make a lot of white folks feel uncomfortable and unsure if they are welcome and it is never a good idea to alienate the lion's share of potential customers.
 
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Shazbot!
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Discussion Starter #28
I do think some of the signs are a bit much but it might work in areas with high black populations. I doubt it would go over well in most areas because such signs would make a lot of white folks feel uncomfortable and unsure if they are welcome and it is never a good idea to alienate the lion's share of potential customers.
Maybe the lion's share of the potential customers aren't necessarily included their business model. Or maybe they are.... that's their issue to overcome.
 

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Maybe the lion's share of the potential customers aren't necessarily included their business model. Or maybe they are.... that's their issue to overcome.
I see no sign of any business model. Perhaps they know of a black person who was told he was not welcome at a farmer's market because of his 'blackness'. I have never heard of that happening though. It looks like they are pretending to solve a problem that doesn't exist. Anyway, I don't expect to see any sign saying 'your blackness is welcome' on a pole flashing in front of any big car dealerships.
 

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Anyway, I don't expect to see any sign saying 'your blackness is welcome' on a pole flashing in front of any big car dealerships.
We are already seeing that.

These are the major brands donating to the Black Lives Matter movement
 

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Maybe it’s purpose isn’t to fight racism? Maybe it’s just to further their community?

They’re clearly allowing other races in who wants to shop, (white woman standing around in the first photo) they’re just featuring black vendors. Same way I’d expect out of some of the hispanic festivals/markets down in FL.
I am all for making a community strong. That is the only way we can get a community to clean up its act by people careing about a place and wanting to make it better. What I don't like and think it is wrong is that only based on the color of your skin can you sell at that market. I thought we were beyond such things.

As I said before what if I created a white only farmers market, or how many times have a heard that the venders at the farmers markets are not diverse enough and we have to get more people of color in there.

Then here we have a market purposely devoid of diversity.

Either we force all things to be diverse or none. What is it going to be? If the law is to be colorblind you can't have it both ways.
 

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What I don't like and think it is wrong is that only based on the color of your skin can you sell at that market. I thought we were beyond such things.
It feels like how a teenager tests their parents to see what they can get away with.
 

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I am all for making a community strong. That is the only way we can get a community to clean up its act by people careing about a place and wanting to make it better. What I don't like and think it is wrong is that only based on the color of your skin can you sell at that market. I thought we were beyond such things.

As I said before what if I created a white only farmers market, or how many times have a heard that the venders at the farmers markets are not diverse enough and we have to get more people of color in there.

Then here we have a market purposely devoid of diversity.

Either we force all things to be diverse or none. What is it going to be? If the law is to be colorblind you can't have it both ways.
Your point would be more valid if we were starting from a blank slate, where everyone had the same access. But we're not.

Farmer's markets, like everything else, have not been colour blind. I am sure there are many instances where black farmers haven't been allotted a stall, give a crappy stall, or their applications have been "forgotten". Similarly, I am sure there are farmer's markets where black customers get the stink-eye from some reactionary vendors. There is a reason why farmer's markets have not been more diverse, so corrective action is needed.

This is also a great market opportunity, where a lot of people are looking specifically to support black-owned businesses as a means of addressing injustice. While white farmers are excluded from this particular market, they continue to have access to all the other markets that have been operating all along.

As we take these corrective actions, clumsily at first, we will eventually get to a point where we don't have to mandate them anymore. All markets will be diverse, all customers will be welcome. But we need to go through a process to get there.....
 

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I am sure there are many instances where black farmers haven't been allotted a stall, give a crappy stall, or their applications have been "forgotten"
Would that fall under the category of assumption?
 
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