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The user of this word is being subservient, neighbor did this earlier tonight. I do not care for it, I can not live up to the image such conger's unless I make major modifications to my lifestyle.

I don't want to be a 'SIR', its too taxing. I just want to be 'Mitch', the wise old neighbor whom is GODs gift to women. Ask your sister..... :p

Got a ride arranged for tomorrow, about out of food, fuel, sinful liquids, other stuff, ect. I might even wear a clean shirt!.....

Just saw a LEO vehicle do a stop, the red and blue lights, reminded me of welding with a wire feed without a facial, visual shield, not a good thing for anybody.

Well, sure you are sure of this update of maladroit manor report, going nighty night now.

Also known as Starvation Plantation when the VA check is near due to arrive.
 

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AppleJackCreek
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I hear ya Mitch: although I'm all for good manners, excessive formality always seems to just put people at an unhappy distance from one another.

Although I have to admit I think it's kinda funny when my son salutes me and says "Yes, sir!" when I ask him to do something.

Particularly since I'm female, and we are Quakers. :D
 

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construction and Garden b
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i use sir too convey respect too those who have served their country. they have traveled a hard road and deserve admiration and our thanks. it has had its miss uses, those that use it in a demeaning or derogatory way show their ignorance. i tend too not like being called mister, means i must be gittin old!! better than "hey you" though!
 

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I certainly use it convey respect and I don't mind being addressed as sir at all. Much better than bro or dude which both show a lack of respect.
 

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Sir, ma'am, please, thank you, excuse me, sorry, may I, are part of the respect I pay to everyone and are ingrained into my vocabulary. I also open doors for people. Some habits are hard to break.
 

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I read a good article several years ago that equated the loss of terms like ma'am and sir with the fall of western civilization! It went on to say that using those words was a verbal reminder for younger people to respect their elders (you don't have to be "old" to be an elder to an 8yo!). It helped keep kids from being smart alek know it alls. Also, it helped remind the adults that kids and younger people ARE looking up to them whether they want it or not. It helped them to see themselves as adults and not the overgrown kids that are so prevalent in today's society. I can see a lot of truth in that.

Since we are 1)rural, 2)were raised conservatively, 3)lived many years in the South, and 4)expect our dd to respect authorities in her life, we both model the use of and expect her to use the titles ma'am and sir. It has nothing to do with submission and everything to do with politeness and respect.
 

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There are some who are excessively respectful to the point of smarminess. I see that sometimes in drug addicts. They sound as syrupy as a Hallmark card, but all the while they're mentally cataloging your stuff.
 

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We also grew up using *Sir* and *Ma'am* (and I am from Ohio LOL!). It was a sign of respect. And we never called an adult by their first name! It was always *Mr. Smith* or *Mrs. Jones*. To this day I see parents of kids I went to school with and cannot bring myself to call them by their first names!

Our dd is going on 4 years and she is to call people *Mr. John* or *Miss Jane*. There are very few people that she calls by first name...I can think of only 3 people that she calls by first name and they are very close family friends.

In today's society of disrespectful know-it-all kids, I find it refreshing to hear people utter names in respectful tones, JMHO :)

Have a great day!
Shawna
 

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Moopups it makes you feel old doesn't it! I prefer Ma'am (and tell them to call me something else, Mrs X or Miz Jenn, if I will spend a lot of time with them) to "Lieutenant" or "Captain" I got in smarmy disrespectful tones from older civilians (usually former military) when I was in the Army. Funnily enough noone ever said "Major" in quite the same disrespectful way....
 

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Funny my and my husband we just having this conversation the other day.

Shhhhh don't tell him evidently he must have been right....everyone pretty much agrees with him.

He had the boys saying "yes, sir". I told him to cut that out. It makes me think of how a subordinate talks to his superior (as in military), but mostly how an ex-con talks to a cop. I'm not raising CRIMINALS or mini army men, so they don't need to use those terms. And if they are ever in the military, I'm sure they will teach them how to talk like that at that time.

A young girl called me maam about a month ago and I found it kind of offensive. I'm young, not some old lady. I guess I probably did look old to her :) When did I become a maam!!
 

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Gotta agree with WIHH. When someone calls me sir, or I hear someone calling a woman mam, it makes me think that their parents did a good job raising them. It's a sign of respect for their elders. I was taught to do it, and I taught my kids the same. But it's almost becoming lost on the younger generation. Although, my daughter is teaching her stepdaughters to say sir and mam. I can't imagine why anyone would be offended by it.
 
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Melissa said:
I do know what you mean. It makes one feel old to be called sir or maam. I never feel like I am old enough to be a maam! I am so easy-going and laid back, I would rather be called just by my name.
Me too. :)
 

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Big Front Porch advocate
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Goodness, I never knew manners were impolite. Guess different ages, different cultures.

I even call younger people Sir and Ma'am.

Angie
 

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And while we're at it, what about unfamiliar bank tellers who call you by your first name? What's up with that? If there is any situation that I want kept formal and respectful, its my financial information......
 

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I'm southern reared also - all my friend's parents, teachers, persons who I thought were older, were called Mr./Miss/Mrs. first name or last name. Yes ma'm and yes sir, please and thank you ... it was taught as being well mannered.

If you did not grow up with this I can see where it could be miss taken -- but you have to admit of all the things you can be called, don't you think Sir or Ma'm is not so bad?

Hugs,
Marlene
 

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If my kids didn't use "sir and "m'aam", I'd snatch em up in a heartbeat.

And my kids are 23 and 21....
 
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