I despise landscape fabric!!!!

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by kidsngarden, Jul 4, 2006.

  1. kidsngarden

    kidsngarden Well-Known Member

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    Spent the greater portion of the day pulling landscape fabric from underneath one of my large beds. The previous owners put it under about 8 inches of bark. What a pain! They did a real hodge podge job with the layout and put things too close too eachother and now they are so overgrown! They also planted this really invasive viney groundcover that is just loose enough to let weeds go through, but tight enough not to let them out.

    anyway I hate that fabric because you have to cut a whole to plant anything and moving things is a pain! I move things around a lot when I think they aren't working and I also like to plant new things all the time. I don't care much for too much of what they had planted so I pulled a lot of stuff. The only time I have found landscape fabris useful is when I put it under a gravel walkway and had NOTHING planted - then it worked great!

    The root systems of the plants and incorporated weeds was about 6 inches deep and embedded in the fabric it had to be cut piece by piece, pulling it up as you went - back breaking work and I have another bed to go - UGH!

    Just had to rant!

    kids
     
  2. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    The stuff just doesn't work for me! My entire path of 20 year fabric (yeah, right :rolleyes: ) has grass sprouting out of it.....and it's fabric, then sand, then stone!
     

  3. BrahmaMama

    BrahmaMama Well-Known Member

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    I would have to tend to agree, It's not all cracked up to what they say.

    I put a long strip of it down along side my strawberries, (they are planted along the LONG side of the garden), just to keep the lawn at bay. If there is a speck of dirt on top of it and a weed seed, it'll grow :grump: and push roots right through, and it's not old enough to degrade that much!
    I'm glad it was given to me, and I didn't pay for it!

    I did however put a small piece of it down beside the house, with cedar mulch on top, and then 2 pots of flowers on top of that. THAT seems to be behaving itself! :)
     
  4. grannygardner

    grannygardner Well-Known Member

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    I don't like landscape fabric either. In the strips where I don't want anything at all to grow I slit a heavy duty black trash bag and lay it down, then cover it with mulch. I just make sure that I overlap the trash bags several inches and it seems to work fine so far.
     
  5. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I am none too impressed with the fabric. I tried it in the aisles between my raised beds, and the weeds really like growing in/through it. But plastic doesn't work for me either, because water puddles up big time. Splish, splash, slip, and down goes Pony!

    I've gone the cardboard route: absolutely free for the gleaning, lets water through, keeps weeds down really well. I just mulch on top of it. Lasts longer than landscaping fabric, too.

    Pony!
     
  6. Chris in PA

    Chris in PA Well-Known Member

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    The only place I use landscape fabric is under the pathways of my garden. And then I cover it with a couple of inches of mulch.

    Most people use the fabric and use too much mulch too. I saw trees mulched at a business that had to have at least 5 inches of mulch around them and up against the trunk. When those trees die because they can't get any air to the roots or a mouse eat the bark while hiding under the mulch, they will be upset about the tree and blame the weather - or the tree supplier!
     
  7. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    Bet it would work if you put the house on top of it too :p
     
  8. kidsngarden

    kidsngarden Well-Known Member

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    Well now I'm trying to figure out what to do with the stuff! I guess it will be to the dump as it is in small pieces after being cut to shreds in my angry pulling of it!

    Yes, pathways and other places you don't want to grow things - places where no dirt will get on it - that's the place for landscape cloth.

    kids
     
  9. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    the only really effective use i have seen was on a bank where creeping blue junipers (i hope that is right...blue rugs) were planted. i think professional landscape contractors like to use it when they are working from a design blueprint and know they will be maintaining the beds they install.
     
  10. Chris in PA

    Chris in PA Well-Known Member

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    A number of years ago we had a friend who used to work for a landscaper help us do some major grading and seeding. He just could not understand my hate of landscape fabric. He figured you put it down, planted you plants in the places you wanted them, put down mulch and walked away. He didn't understand the whole concept that I may want to add annuals one year, or move a plant or - heavens - take out a perrenial and divide it... Now I understand he was not the designer or a horticulturalist but he didn't understand how I garden, that is for sure. He thought I was nuts when I said NO Fabric.
     
  11. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We tried out landscaping fabric at our last house. I wanted a nice flower garden along the driveway, and a different type under a big maple tree. I loved it. Killed the grass, laid down the fabric, put in the plants, covered with bark. Seeds would blow in the gardens, but they were easy to pull out. The gardens were carefully thought out, though, so I didn't have to go back and start pulling things out.

    The previous owners of same house had, about 20 years before, planted cedars, which are moisture lovers, under the eaves in the back. Then, they put down heavy plastic and covered it all with 3 inches of gravel. Those poor scraggly cedars. I imagine they must have pushed their roots out to the lawn or they wouldn't have survived at all. Moving gravel is incredibly hard work. I couldn't really shovel it, and it's very heavy. And that awful plastic-- # ! * -//! :grump:
     
  12. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    Both landscape fabric and black plastic are nasty, if you ask me. They always work their way to the surface, they never prevent weeds completely, and they are both a @#$ to get out.

    Should be illegal. :grump:
     
  13. Red Devil TN

    Red Devil TN Well-Known Member

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    I love the stuff!!!





















    For covering draining stone beds/fields and keeping the junk out of the bed.... granted it is then covered by 1-4 ft. of soil. :D