I bought a new chainsaw this morning

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by michiganfarmer, Jul 7, 2006.

  1. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    Back in 1992 when I bought my 80 acres I bought a commercial steihl chainsaw model 034. Its been nickle, and dimeing me lately. I went to the local dealer to get a spark plug, a new fuel hose because mine was rotten and sucking air, a new air filter, and a screw that broke on the guard. I talked to the salesman about replacing my 034. He said the ms 361 was slightly more power than my 034. Well I know how modern equipment power ratings never produce the amount of power that older equipment did si I bought the next bigger saw than what the salesman said replaced my old one. I bought the MS 440. http://www.stihlusa.com/chainsaws/MS440.html

    Kinda pricey, but I cut close to 20 pulp cord of wood per year, and I dont intend on buying another saw for 20 years. I want something that will last. I heat with wood, and boil maple syrup with wood.

    I cant wait to get home this evening!
     
  2. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    20 years use out of a heavily used chainsaw isn't realisic regardless of brand.
    10 years, yes. I had 67 cc model and was happy to get 7 or 8 years out of it. Even then the depreciation vs. the amount of work and firewood it produced was well worth the price and less frustration over using a less powerful model.
     

  3. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    20 years isnt realistic? the 034 was my first saw, and it lasted...well its 14 years old, and still runs ok, I just wanted a new one.
    This MS440 was $709, but like you said, the the amount of work it will do, the speed it will do it, and the durability of a commercial saw is well worth the price
     
  4. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    When I find a brand I like I tend to stick with it. I bought a Stihl 026 in 1995. Use it primarily for fence row clearing - which is about as hard on a saw as you can get. One summer I went through eight gallons of bar oil. If a vehicle I would say it had 150-200K on it. Increasingly nickle and diming me, so sold it on eBay as a parter and bought a Stihl MS260 Pro.

    However, will note a large influence on the Stihl 260 is now the brand carried by the local farmers' co-op. A neighbor usually does my repairs (he has a small engine repair shop out of his detached garage) so parts are readily accessible through the Co-op.

    I might have gotten more than eleven years out of the 026, but just made the decision to replace.

    Happiness is a new Stilh chainsaw with a new blade. Cut on............
     
  5. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    Dad had a Stihl which was arguably best of saws we have owned over the years. Tried Johnsered, burned thru it pretty quick. All the commercial Loggers in our area were using Husqvarna, so our most recent saw was a Husqvarna 362. I am unable to tell you if they last many hours, because it is such a poor starting saw it pretty much sits in the shop unused. Cold blooded.
    Starts and dies, sputters out. Had back to dealer twice- no better. Replaced fuel lines, air filters, spark plug, tried basics- still cold blooded.
    I'm not much on small engine mechs, but by God when you buy a brand new chainsaw you expect it to start& run at least enough to put a few hours on it. :flame: Guess I'm soured on Orange.
     
  6. Dave S.

    Dave S. Well-Known Member

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    I've always run Stihl, but got a good deal on a Husky 394. It soon became the only saw I would even consider using, for anything, even small brush. Then it screeched to a halt last fall cutting firewood, siezed up tight. There was no reason to have quit. So it sits on the shelf and I had to break out another saw that had been sitting unloved, upside down in the corner for five years. It's still going strong today. :shrug:
     
  7. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    leave it to mega corporations to get ya with the ole' bait and switch. many good brand names fall by the wayside, huskvarna, troybuilt...and the list keeps growing. :shrug:
     
  8. Blu3duk

    Blu3duk Well-Known Member

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    When i was cutting regualr that was about 2 weeks worth of bar oil maybe i could squeeze a little more out, but shoot oil is what keeps the chain slipping around the horn! and without that chain going how can anyone make any progress cutting logs?

    As for long term life the bigger saws are intended to be run hard and live to tell about it for a couple of seasons, so if all a person is gonna cut is about 20 cord of pulpwood [and i take that as sawlog length not firewood length] there would be no reason a power saw would not last nearly 20 years cause ya aint even hardly breaking a sweat cutting 20 cord of logs.

    I spect i ought to buy another saw one of these years too, my old 288 husky has cut several tens of thousands feet of logs and or couple hundred cord of firewood depending upon the way you look at things, but i quit professional cutting a long ways back, and only bought the saw for the big logs i encounter once and awhile around Central Idaho... I have a 28 inch bar on it and only met a couple trees i had a hard time cutting all the way through with, though many do exist still, I kinda like the ones 40 inches and under as they dont take so long to cut up, and my sawmill can only cut a 42 inch diameter log the way i have it set up currently.

    The worst luck ive had with any type of saws at all are the little ones with the short bars, nice one hand board saws, but to cut anything of size i pick up the bigger saws.

    My dad in law figured 3 seasons per saw cutting for helicopters, and always had 3 saws with him for cutting, generally 2 in the strip and one at camp for when one broke down, so he bought one each season and retired one... he preferred the 250 -260 series huskies cause the weight to power ratio was better than the bigger saws and he pulled a 32 inch bar with those.... and still was able to cut a few over 6 foot stumps, and one 14 foot cedar clump [it was only a thin shell, nearly a death trap]

    William