I am still hungry!!!!

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Hiro, Aug 3, 2017.

  1. Hiro

    Hiro Well-Known Member

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    Daphne.JPG

    We had a good month without having to bottle feed anything. I should have known it wouldn't last. This calf was violently rejected by her mother to the point I had to stand over the top of it after she got beat up while my wife got a cage.

    Three weeks now and the calf is convinced each bottle is too small. So, she gnaws on my wife's arm......
     
  2. ShannonR

    ShannonR hillbilly farmgirl

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    Time for a bucket with a nipple on it. They are really great, you an hang them on a fence rail and not have to hold for the calves.
     

  3. Hiro

    Hiro Well-Known Member

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    I have two buckets with nipples gathering dust. Perhaps you can convince my wife to use them. She is in love with this creature.......It is now behind the house with two of the now weaned bottle fed lambs that I had to collect from the flock so it wouldn't be by itself. I love my wife.
     
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  4. danil54grl

    danil54grl Well-Known Member

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    My husband can understand what you are going thru. . .:) I had to bottle fed a few calved. The last one only cause mom got messed up by the bull and only had two working teats. Oh how he would run up when he saw me out there. We did eventually take Norm to slaughter. Hope you won't have an issue at that time.
     
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  5. hiddensprings

    hiddensprings Well-Known Member

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    My husband also knows exactly what you are talking about. I'd raise 4 at a time (got pretty good at holding two bottles in one hand, one between my knees and then 1 in the other hand) There is just something about having your babies come running when they see you. Time consuming yes, got bruises from them whacking the bottles, but I wouldn't change it for the world.
     
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  6. Hiro

    Hiro Well-Known Member

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    This confound calf is a conundrum. She eats and grazes just fine, but is scared to death of other cows. I guess she remembers her first day of life too well. I fence lined her with the cows for a month and she was just fine and very curious. However, when I put her in and they walked her way, she ran like a scared rabbit. Being the grumpy old man, I walked away and left her. I checked an hour later and could not find her anywhere. Finally, I walked out into the middle of a 20 acre pasture and called her name. She ran up to me like a dog, shaking like a leaf and I walked her out at my hip to put her back with her sheep.....

    I'll try again with a smaller herd when I pull out some to finish. Goober calf:

    Grain nose.JPG
     
  7. mmoetc

    mmoetc Well-Known Member

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    She’s got you well trained.

    Yes, the statement applies equally to the calf and your wife.
     
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  8. CountryMom22

    CountryMom22 Well-Known Member

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    I would just let her live with her sheep. She's happy there and I'm assuming your wife wants her to be happy. Then you'll be happy too. It's a win/win.

    Good luck!
     
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  9. Hiro

    Hiro Well-Known Member

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    The calf wouldn't disagree, my wife likely would. Her training success is sporadic, success on some things and a dismal failure on others. She is rather persistent, like she is playing a long game or something.

    I gave in after many years this spring and castrated a ram lamb that she bottle fed that was also rejected. So, now there is a pet sheep that consumes resources roaming around the farm somewhere. I can handle that type of financial drain. I am not about to have a pet cow. She will procreate or end up in someones freezer, even if not mine. I am the grumpy old man, after all.
     
  10. Gravytrain

    Gravytrain Well-Known Member

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    Why would you want to propagate the genes of a cow that rejects her offspring? Both mama and calf should be pointed toward someone's freezer...no question, no hesitation.

    A couple years ago, one of my old full blood angus brood cows (9 or 10 years) developed bottle teats. Her heifer calf couldn't nurse at all and would have starved had we not pulled her off her dam. We intervened later than we should have, but my wife nursed that calf back to life, taught her the rules, showed her discipline, etc.. The kids used to ride her around the farm. From the beginning, I told my wife this calf would need to be culled somehow...auction or butcher. She agreed at first, but then, of course, as she became attached to it wanted to experiment with her as a brood cow. I told her, "no way", but she persisted and I relented, though I knew (and told her) it wasn't going to end well. She was bred the following year and calved last year. Yep, she had bottle teats her first year, though her bull calf could nurse just fine. Without going into gory details, she was a terrible mother, her calf died an inexcusable sudden death inside of two weeks of age, of which I'll never forgive myself. My wife now "gets it".

    Using emotion or convenience as an excuse to propagate substandard animals will take its toll sooner or later...usually sooner. Use the proceeds from the auction barn or meat sale to purchase a sound brood cow.
     
  11. Hiro

    Hiro Well-Known Member

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    I am culling the mother. You may wish to run your operation by culling any rejected offspring. I have had success with rejected offspring being wonderful with their own. The whole line she came from has a 100% calf survival rate over the last 6 years and this is the first rejected calf in many years. I'll probably lose the next 8 now that I said that.
     
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