I am afraid of hoof rot...

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Jillis, Apr 6, 2006.

  1. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    We are having our typical rainy mud season, and the hay that the girls have scattered around outside is quite thick after the winter...and poopy too...even where there is no hay, they are constantly squelching around in this muck, and their hooves are always wet, poopy and muddy, as the condition of my barn clothes will verify.

    How can I alleiviate some of these conditions to prevent them getting hoof rot? Should I scatter some copper sulfate over the muddy mess? Any ideas or experience would be welcomed!

    Thanks in advance! Jillis!
     
  2. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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    Don't know how to dry your pens but to pray for sunshine!

    Start working on those hooves as much as possible and as frequntly as you can so you know what's going on. Keep them trimmed up and cleaned out of poop and mud. If there is any infection in there, you should be able to smell it, kind of yeasty smelling. Your nose will be your guide. Also, extra tenderness is a clue. If the goat seems to be limping or hobbling, be very suspicious. Clean the hooves of any white matter in there and dip each foot in some Iodine solution a couple of times a day. I would think that in a pinch, a mild clorox solution would do, better than nothing at all. Wear some old clothes. I had a doe who came to me with bad feet and she was prone to infection everytime it got the least bit muddy, which doesn't happen much as we live in the sand in the Texas drought!. But hay had built up in her pen and then it drizzled for a week. I treated her feet like I just said and it cleared up fine. Just keep an eye on them and get you someone for a good goat holder!
     

  3. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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    Oh, and one more thing, a friend down the road gave me a good idea. If you need to get those goats on something dry real fast, throw some empty dry feed bags down for them to stand on. Just change them out as soon as they get messed up. You can even put hay over the top of the feed bags so the goats will leave them alone. Just don't forget about them as they will just add to the problem if they start rotting in the mud.
     
  4. Jcran

    Jcran Well-Known Member

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    Oh sistah! I, too, am squishing around in the muck; over 65 inches of rain since July, we are at 175% of our rain for the year! I only have 10 does right now and I just pop them on the stand once a week and dip their feet in a SHALLOW bath of 7% iodine. It dries them out. Only one goat had a bad foot this year and it was 'cause I wasn't vigilant-it was on the INSIDE of her front hoof and I didn't catch it until it was really deep. Now the iodine is working great. I only wish they made water wings for goatie legs-their pasture is really hookey!
     
  5. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    I've used the empty feed bags...I will try the iodine dip too. Thanks for the input. Their hooves are just full of liquid poop, it seems like, up their legs at times too...Ai yi yi!
    I did read something that indicated that lime can be used to dry soil, but I think that may have been a lime that might not be good for goats to walk in...
     
  6. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    if you have access to it at all i would put gravle and sand out in the yard to help with drainage, is the pen in a low area? does all the water collect there or is it that the dirt has been worked into such a slurry clay that it wont let the water go?
    if its a low spot that wont drain you can dig a trinch going at a down hill slope away from your pen, put a layer of gravle in the bottom, then a pice of PVC pipe with holes drilled in it all over up and down then put more gravle over the pipe and then back fill with dirt, this will let the water drain out, try to follow the natural curves and slope of the land if you can to make it easyer,
    if its just real heavy clay that wont let the water go you need lots and lots of sand to loosen it up, then some gravle wont hurt to help keep the animals up off the yuck.
    i know its not much of a QUIK FIX but it should help you in the long run
     
  7. Goat Freak

    Goat Freak Slave To Many Animals

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    This might sound a bit silly, but when me and my brother were really little, and went with our grandma on her paper route,, when it was raining we would put some of the bags from the newspapers over our shoes and it would work even if we had to go outside in the mud. Maybe if you put 2-3 bags on each hoof, and used rubber bands to hold them up, loosly of course, maybe that would help? Good Luck Jill. See ya. Bye.
     
  8. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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    I would be afraid the goats would eat the plastic and then there would be a whole new set of problems.

    BTW, i wouldn't mind some of that 65 inches of rain....just not all at once. It has been illegal to BBQ or outdoor burning for almost a year here because of the fire hazard from the drought. Some counties have outlawed smoking outdoors because of the fire hazard and we don't have laws about smoking cigarettes outdoors like california does!
     
  9. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    Can you get your hands on some cinder blocks? I lay out cinder blocks as a sort of path for my goats to get them out of the mud, and check their feet weekly.
     
  10. goatmarm

    goatmarm Well-Known Member

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    I tried the gravel route here, but the mud is sooo mushy that it squashes up through the gravel when they walk across it.

    Jen H., I like the cinder block idea. I think I'll make a stepping stone path with patio blocks/cinderblocks, and big flat rocks out to the dry areas. It is really only the area directly behind the barn that seems extra muddy. It doesn't get a lot of sun like the front+side of the barn.
     
  11. Goat Freak

    Goat Freak Slave To Many Animals

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    Sorry, I didn't think about the goats eating the plastic. That was not good advice. Sorry. Bye.
     
  12. famer_manda

    famer_manda I Love CHICKENS!

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    I looked at my goats hooves. They are not smooth. There isn't any infection but they are cracked and broken up somewhat. They walk around fine. Is it normal to look kind of smashed?? or should they be smooth like deers?
     
  13. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    Snicker.

    Snort.

    HOOOOOOHAHAHAHA!!!

    I was relishing the mental image of all my goats tromping around in their plastic booties!!! I seriously doubt they would leave them on for long, anyway. But thanks for the suggestion!

    This is northern VT. The entire goat pen is a series of dips and swells and it rains a LOT up here...Spring is terrible bad for mud anyway with the snow melting and the rain coming down and usually the frost barrier is not melted yet so it all stays on top and makes MUDMUDMUD!

    And with a winter's worth of poop being exposed and melting into it it is just YUCK!

    Cinder blocks...hmmmm...now there's a thought...