I always knew we had good growing soil in the Ozarks

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Show-Me-Stater, Nov 17, 2006.

  1. Show-Me-Stater

    Show-Me-Stater Well-Known Member

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    PURDY, Mo. - If Kip Cullers is looking to make it big, he may have found his niche.

    Because when it comes to crop yields, Cullers is now in a category all his own.

    Cullers, of Purdy, has set a world record for soybean production by turning out 139.39 bushels of soybeans per acre - and it came in a year plagued by drought.


    read the rest of the article here
     
  2. ceresone

    ceresone Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yuppers, this is in a year we had several weeks of over 100 degrees!
     

  3. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    Let's see: He manages 5,000 acres but was only required to report the harvest from one five acre plot of his own choosing. He was likely allowed to use all of the fungicide, pesticide, fertilizer and maybe even irrigation he wanted. Rather stacks the deck in his favor.

    It is not gross profit, but net profit which counts at the bank. I would be interested to see what his net profit on these five acres was compared to a convention farmer harvesting say 40 bushels to the acre farm-wide.

    Sort of like the giant pumpkin contests to where the growers only allow one pumpkin per plant to grow and then fertilize and pamper the bejeezes out of it - including some using milk for the calcium in it.
     
  4. WolfWalksSoftly

    WolfWalksSoftly Level II -Inappropriate

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    I live in the Ozarks (outside of Rolla) so I just had to read this thread. We have the worst soil imaginable. The top soil (cough) is maybe 2 inches, then you have 50 feet of rock and red clay. The only crop I see growing here on a large scale is hay..lol
     
  5. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    Most folks in agriculture no longer remember Louis Bromfield. He had a fair sized farm (for the time and area) outside of Manchester, OH called Malabar Farm. He wrote several books and numerous articles on it. Rather became the show place farm in the U.S. as a result. Bromfield always like to hype the farm's output. At one time he use to go around making speeches at Granges and such saying they got 125 bushels of corn to the acre, at a time when 60 might have been considered a good crop. What he didn't say is that was in one small field under almost ideal growing conditions. Elsewhere on the farm he was doing a bit better than most since he grew green manure crops as fertilizer and really believed in the benefits of liming.

    Some years ago FARM SHOW magazine reported on a farmer growing 200 bushes of corn to the acre. However, he was using irrigation water from a pond in which catfish were grown in cages. Essentially he was pumping fertilizer on the corn, not water.

    As noted, when you hear of farmers putting out these super yield crops ask what their net profit per acre was compared to typical farming.
     
  6. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ken, while I'm sure that there is no profit in these high yeild experiments, I think you need to acknowledge that the folks who have pushed this envelope throughout history have made a huge contribution to the body of agricultural knowledge we have today.
     
  7. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    Point well taken.

    However, like the cattle industry. I'm not sure we are any better off with the exotic cross breeding on beef cattle than if those in the upper half of the U.S. had just stuck with Angus, Hereford and crosses of those two.
     
  8. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yeah, I hear ya. I thank any cow that needs a normally presented calf pulled should go straight to slaughter after weaning (along with the calf, and probably the bull)