Hydrofracking is awesome!

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by buspete, Oct 4, 2005.

  1. buspete

    buspete Well-Known Member

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    I just had to tell this to someone. :dance:

    We bought our house from HUD, a real pig in a poke. Turns out the well is a dud, making something like a pint of water a minute.

    This means we need to time out our water use. If we did the dishes and the laundry in the same day, we couldn't also bathe. We caught rainwater for the chickens. Summer was great becasue you could shower out on the deck when it rained! Flushing the toilet was something you did only when there was something...uuh, "solid" to flush.

    A year of this was enough, my wife's parents were coming from out of state to see our place and we made the decision to get the well fixed even if it killed our budget.

    The answer turned out to be hydrofracking. It's a process where a specialized truck come out, removes your well pump, and blasts water down the drilled well at up to 3000psi to shatter the bedrock and open up the fissures that water follows to get into your well.

    In our case, the pressure gauge went up to 675psi before it popped. When all was said and done, we are now getting 6 1/2 gallons of water per minute. You can actually hear the water pouring into the well. :rock:

    Hydrofracking.....$1800

    Being able to shower, flush and do laundry whenever you want.....PRICELESS!!!
     
  2. Caren

    Caren Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Great for you! I've never heard of it. DH used to shoot down our well every so often at the old house. I wonder if it is along the same principle...
     

  3. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Wow, glad it worked for you!
     
  4. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ................."fracking" has been SOP in the oil field for many years . It can create problems as well , if the cement and gravel that the well driller poured down the outside of the casing to seal off any other water zones ABove the desired zone can "brake down" and the fracking fluid will crack the cement and travel....UP....the bore hole , on the OUTSIDE of the casing and completely ignore the holes in the casing that the fracking fluid was supposed to cleanup . This is called "communication" . There can be other problems as well . fordy... :)
     
  5. DrippingSprings

    DrippingSprings In Remembrance

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    I dont mind a little iron in my water but I can do without lead
     
  6. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    Great knowledge to file away.

    Thank You.

    BooBoo
     
  7. tallpines

    tallpines Well-Known Member

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    We needed to "fracture".
    The cost was $1000 over and above the $4500 for the drilling.

    'Twas worth it----Good WATER!
     
  8. Caren

    Caren Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You know I never thought about that. Lead Yick. The water was nasty We never drank it. We used to bring water home from my inlaws for cooking and drinking. DH and I still haven't been able t break the pop habit left over from this.
     
  9. sisterpine

    sisterpine Goshen Farm Supporter

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    i asked our driller about that when our well came up dry at drilling. but he said you had to have some water first for it to work!?
     
  10. Jim-mi

    Jim-mi Well-Known Member

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    Its good to now and again read all of the above.......

    Now I can go get a drink of water and be greatfull that I have a very good operating well.
     
  11. buspete

    buspete Well-Known Member

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    Cement?

    Is that an oil well thing, or does it have to do with the soil you are working with?

    Here in the Granite State, the bedrock is really close to the surface. On this particular well, it's only four feet down from the surface. The first 28' of the well is a steel (iron?) casing then it's 270' of granite.

    The seal is made with a rubber gland on the end of a metal thing that is lowered down the well. The first fracturing was done 80' down, the second was 160'.

    The guy who did it told me some horror stories of the steel casing being launched out of the ground by the pressure if it is done wrong.
     
  12. Gary in ohio

    Gary in ohio Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you pee let it be, if its brown flush it down!
     
  13. Pony

    Pony STILL not Alice Supporter

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    heh...

    we always say,

    "If it's yellow,
    Let it mellow.
    If it's brown,
    Send it down."

    Same principle.

    Also, in the outhouse, there's a sign on the lime bucket:

    "If you tinkle,
    Use a sprinkle;
    If you poop,
    Use a scoop!"

    ;)

    Pony!
     
  14. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ...........Well , funny you should ask!! That rubber "thing" is probably a Hardened rubber plug that they "set" below the perforations to prevent the fluid from going down the well bore instead of into the rock that they want to "break down" by using fairly high pressure . And , there are many documented cases of whole Production Strings of pipe , and I'm talking several thousand feet of Heavy , thickwall pipe being literally 'fired' out of the well bore. This ISN'T the casing , rather this is a smaller diameter pipe say 3 inch OD that is suspended inside the casing . After they drill a successful well they have to perforate the casing by blasting holes thru the pipe , the outer layer of concrete betwixt the casing and the rock and Then into the formation itself . This is accomplished by using a "gun" about 2 to 3 inches in diameter. The gun is loaded with extremely powerful explosive charges
    that all fire at once and the blast of each charge must be offset by other charges such that the combined energy is expended in ALL directions equally , otherwise the gun will be forced out of it's centered location and some charges will be fired into unknown locations . Then, after the holes are "shot" into the pipe and formation they frac the well to open up the perforations to maximize the recovery of oil\gas . fordy... :eek: ;)
     
  15. canfossi

    canfossi Well-Known Member

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    We had our well hydrofractured on my property up north. The flow was 3 gpm and after the hydrofracturing it increased to 7 gpm. We are also having the same well guy come to my house now to see if he can increase the flow rate. It's well worth the money if you don't have very good flow. Thanks, Chris
     
  16. SouthernThunder

    SouthernThunder Well-Known Member

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    Before hydrafracturing the preferred method was good old fashioned fracturing. This involved nothing more than TNT. It was a lot more likely to collaspe the fissures and ruin your well but if the well was going to be useless to begin with it was worth a shot. I have TNT fracted a couple of wells on my property and completely toasted one. :rock: The other one seems to have almost doubled in gph... going from 1 to 2. :( At any rate, it sure gets the neighbor's attention!
     
  17. palani

    palani Well-Known Member

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    Another method I have heard of is liquid Co2. Pump it down until nothing moves any more. I guess the freezing generates the fractures in the soil or rock.
     
  18. Darren

    Darren Still an :censored:

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    They use liquid nitrogen for gas wells.