Hydranga question.......

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Mutti, Jan 2, 2007.

  1. Mutti

    Mutti Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Planted a blue hydranga two years ago and last year it had 8 huge blossoms. Now, do I have to cut these off or prune the plant back? Dee
     
  2. Heritage

    Heritage Well-Known Member

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    Just cut off the faded blossoms (called dead heading). You don't need to prune the plant itself back but do remove any dead branches (make sure they're dead before cutting them, some look dead, but if your bend them they bend and are green inside - dead ones will snap off). If you're adventuresome, cut one of the non-flowering stems off about 5 inches long, remove the lower leaves, cut larger leaves half off, and stick in a cup of moist potting soil in a zip lock bag. We've always had excellent success with rooting them for spring planting. We now have 4 HUGE plants surrounding our front porch and dozens of younguns scattered here and there.
     

  3. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Don't forget to cut a circle around them (about 8 inches out from the base of the plant) and replace the soil every 4 years or so. Also, acidifying the soil will keep the blooms blue. :)

    Pony!
     
  4. Miz Mary

    Miz Mary Well-Known Member Supporter

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  5. Pony

    Pony Well-Known Member Supporter

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  6. mommagoose_99

    mommagoose_99 Well-Known Member

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    I saw the Martha Stewart show where she took cuttings from her hydrangas and rooted them. I would love to have a hedge like hers with all the different colors of hydrangas. Do you suppose we could send each other cuttings of our hydrangas and share different colors? I am afraid all I have are several dozen ancient white plants that I could share. Also does anyone know a company with really nice plants for sale?
    Linda
     
  7. Miz Mary

    Miz Mary Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thank You Pony !!!!
     
  8. Spinner

    Spinner Well-Known Member

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    I have blue ones and would be happy to trade for some white ones. I don't know if my blue will be blue at your house or if they will be pink. They were pink at another place. When a start was brought here (years and years before I bought this place) it had blue flowers. I've been told the type of soil you have can change the color of the blossoms.

    How do you root cuttings? I've been told not to take cuttings, but to pin down a branch and let it root while attached to the mother plant. After it roots, then cut it and dig it.
     
  9. BasicLiving

    BasicLiving Well-Known Member

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    My grandmother could get a plastic flower to root - I swear she had a green body! She always rooted her yard plants like you described - by putting a rock on a branch and covering the area with soil. Worked every time.

    A friend had a really nice blue hydranga and I cut 2 branches from it, stuck them in potting soil and kept them moist. They rooted just fine and grew up to be beautiful big plants.

    I think either way would work just fine.

    Penny
     
  10. mommagoose_99

    mommagoose_99 Well-Known Member

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    My next question would be, when would the best time be to take the cuttings? My plants are dormant right now
     
  11. BasicLiving

    BasicLiving Well-Known Member

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    If you have green branches left anywhere, you can take them and do it now. I took a Master Gardeners class many years ago and we tried several methods of rooting plants - they were all successful. One of them was geared towards starting cuttings during the winter, but it was a little more work than just sticking a branch in soil, so I only did it that one time, but it was successful for me. We took cuttings, removed all the leaves, put them in potting soil. Watered it well, put a plastic baggie over it and secured with a rubber band around the top lip of the pot (making a "greenhouse"). Then we put them in a basement where it was cool with NO light for about 3 weeks. When we brought them out, all of them had rooted and within a few weeks had little leaves coming out.

    I personally prefer just sticking them in potting soil, but I usually only do that in the warm months, so maybe the above method works well during the winter months?

    If you have green branches, just take a few cuttings and try it. If it doesn't work, try it again in the spring!

    Penny
     
  12. Spinner

    Spinner Well-Known Member

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    I'll check tomorrow for any green branches. I did learn not to prune the "dead" branches in winter. Did that once and didn't have any blooms the next year. I guess they set the following years blooms in the fall.
     
  13. mommagoose_99

    mommagoose_99 Well-Known Member

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    Hi Sorry I did not get back to the people who would like to swap cuttings. I have been reading up on the subject. It would seem that it would be a good idea to wait for the plants to come out of dormancy before taking the cuttings. I really want to plant a hedge of these pretty bushes sooo I will post again in the spring and see if we can get a real swap going.:) Sounds like it could be grat fun!!!
    Linda