How would you go about buying a pig or lamb

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by almostthere, Jan 10, 2007.

  1. almostthere

    almostthere Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    989
    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2003
    Location:
    Indiana
    ...to slaughter yourself without raising it?

    What are normal costs involved, where you are? I live in Southern IN, and we have access to many processors, very good ones in fact, but we don't know anyone who raises animals, and my dh asked me to look around to find a pig or lamb(preferably, he says)...we'll be putting it up with the deer we already have.

    Sorry if this sounds like a silly question I just don't know where to start. I do have a couple hunter friends we can call, but after that, any ideas?

    THANK YOU!!!
     
  2. John Schneider

    John Schneider Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    445
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2005
    Location:
    Spruce Grove, Alberta
    I am sure it isn't a silly question to you...A local farmer may have some animals available and at least there you will know what kind of care the animal has received.

    Personally, I would never purchase an animal for slaughter purposes where I do not know how the animal was raised. What chemicals have been injected into the animal? What sicknesses has the animal had? What has the animal been eating? etc. etc. Hit the local Farm Supply store and ask around for local farmers who raise pigs and sheep. Go out and pick your animal out and away you go.
     

  3. almostthere

    almostthere Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    989
    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2003
    Location:
    Indiana
    Thanks, John. Thats one reason why we'd like to buy local...I just don't know what questions to ask or where to begin...I helped him process the last 2 deer he has brought home so this should be fun!
     
  4. TwoAcresAndAGoat

    TwoAcresAndAGoat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    735
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2003
    Location:
    NC
    Ask one of your many processors to recommend a few people.
     
  5. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    851
    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2004
    Location:
    Ky
    If you are buying the animal, paying for feed and housing (with the risk of disease and death which is part of life; hence loss if investment) then paying a processor, most likely your total price per pound will be higher than the grocery store. If you just want to know what it ate, or to say that you raised it that's fine. The way to save money is to have robust animals that forage well on the land you have and have good parenting skills so you minimize feed and veterinary care (feral and landrace animals generally). Buy a small starter flock. Keep your best as breeders and eat the surplus and then do the processing yourself. If you want some step by step slaughtering suggestions, check my homepage

    If you don't mind driving a few hours, I have both sheep (Soay) and pigs (potbellies)
     
  6. beeman97

    beeman97 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    353
    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2003
    Location:
    Southern Tier NY.
    almostthere,
    where are you located in indiana, if you are close to poesyville or wadesville (north & west of evansville) i can point you in the right direction although i will not be able to give you a name or # to call i can tell you where they are, they raise hampshire's in a somewhat outside situation, as opposed to a total confinment operation which is about all you are going to find in that part of indiana.
    if you are traveling from poseyville to wadesville on rte 165 they are located on the wadesville end of 165 right in the middle of the S turn, on the left hand side. I cannot attest to how they raise there animals or what they are fed, but they are outside which is a good step up from the confinment operations.
    good luck
    Rick
     
  7. farmergirl

    farmergirl Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    5,001
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2005
    Location:
    Austin-ish, Texas
    I could sell you either a pig or lamb or both! But, we're in Texas, so alot of good that'll do you. I think you're more likely to find very young animals that still need to be grown out to slaughter weight. You could always go to a livestock auction, but then you'll never know how the animal was handled and raised.
     
  8. vancom

    vancom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    451
    Joined:
    May 5, 2006
    Location:
    Middle Tennessee
    Alot of states have a website--here in TN we do--that has info about producers. We live in the country and our local librarian is married to the school principal, and we learned about their lambs by hanging out at the library... bought one a few weeks ago, drove it to the processor that did our pigs, and the meat was heavenly. We visited the farm ( just 2 miles away!) asked questions and picked him out.

    So run a google check--try <your state> farmers market or something like that. We are seriously considering a side of beef next year from a local farm that does only grass-fed, no hormones, meds, etc.

    Vanessa
    near Nashville
     
  9. Wendy

    Wendy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,312
    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Location:
    SE Indiana
    I also am wondering where in Indiana are you?? I have 2 hogs going to the butcher the 5th of February. They are taken, but I plan to get 2 more to feed out. They won't be ready until fall as I usually start out with runts that someone gives me. If I get 2 to feed out this summer, they will be getting a lot of extra goat milk. I buy feed from a local guy that buys it in bulk. $3 a bag versus over $12 a bag from our local mill makes a huge difference in the cost to raise one.
     
  10. almostthere

    almostthere Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    989
    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2003
    Location:
    Indiana
    I am in Gibson County, about 20-ish miles from Evansville. I know Posey County well, thanks for offering instructions. I don't really know what my dh knows about it but advice is always helpfull, he won't turn up his nose at it.:)

    I can't raise one where I am; we have a large yard in a small town but we're still in town. He was thinking we could find one when ready to slaughter and do it ourselves, he really wants to get more practice doing things himself. I can't say its a bad trait, its not like he'll never use that skill ever again.

    George I am familiar with KY, have family in several spots. You're probably a cousin.:)

    I guess now the next best thing to raising my own is finding someone to raise them for me. We are working on a 5 yr plan(lots of stuff going on right now), have some acerage in mind with a close friend, that will give us space we need and we already have access to over 100 acres of woods to hunt , spread out in 3 different counties. So, as my name implies:"Almostthere". LOL. But man is this taking forever.

    Thanks for replying all, I will be keeping up with this thread but I've got a sick 5 yr old and a new puppy and cleaning up after the 7 yr old who has pink eye so I'm a bit slow.
     
  11. GeorgiaberryM

    GeorgiaberryM Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    263
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2004
    Location:
    southwest AR
    What are called "butcher hogs" are available here, though, the girl at the feed store says she can't find them; we have been able to. We have never sold animals, only had investors, and then only close friends. You can buy as an investor, or buy a live hog and then butcher it yourself at home or at some farms, if they allow. You can also buy live and then pay at a certified butcher, or take your chances at one that is registered for commercial slaughter, in other words, grocery store material. You can save money any of these ways, and you will get better meat in most, and most likely all of them.

    Butchering hogs is hard compared to other animals, so leave yourself some extra time for it.

    I would start with the farmers that have hogs near you, that you may be driving by. Many would be interested to talk to you. I would then try the feed stores; they know who has hogs. Then I would look in the paper. We have found animals all of these ways. In the worst case scenario, you can go to the sale barn. Many of those animals are in fine condition but they have all been exposed to what came before them. I have never bought from the sale barn, but I'm not saying that I wouldn't. Just keep in mind that the prospect of disease spread to other livestock is possible. You can sometimes buy the same meat you'd get in the grocery for pennies on the dollar if you are okay with the quality and do the butchering as you'd intended. If you can buy from a local, and are able to see their layout, then you'll likely be satisfied. Raising hogs is fun, and many small farmers take great pride in it, as such, produce great meat.

    We may sell some this year, but we are far from you.

    Sincerely
    Husband o'G
     
  12. highlands

    highlands Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,852
    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2004
    Location:
    Mountains of Vermont, Zone 3
    Here is an article about the cost of a pig which will give you some ideas.

    http://sugarmtnfarm.com/blog/2006/07/what-is-half-pig-share.html

    In a nut shell, about $3.60 per pound in your freezer and about 130 lbs of cuts from a pig. Do note that the cost of the pig, slaughter and butchering vary greatly with geographic location.

    Good luck!

    -Walter
    in Vermont
     
  13. savinggrace

    savinggrace COO of manure management

    Messages:
    1,427
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2005
    I would stop by a few farms in the area and chat! If that farmer doesn't do it, he probably knows someone else in the area who does.

    Word of mouth my friend. The oldest form of advertising and the best! :)
     
  14. almostthere

    almostthere Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    989
    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2003
    Location:
    Indiana
    These are all great ideas. Thanks everybody!
     
  15. A'sta at Hofstead

    A'sta at Hofstead Turkey Wrangler

    Messages:
    5,193
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2006
    Location:
    New Hampshire USA
    We subscribe the the Market Bulletin here in NH. It costs 22.00 per year, but the good thing is, along with all the great info, you can place free classifieds, there were a couple of people selling freezer pigs in it last week. We will probably have one or two to sell this spring.
     
  16. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

    Messages:
    55,630
    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2006
    Location:
    Eastern North Carolina
    Here the state Agriculture Dept has a website where producers can post ads. Maybe your state has one too. Also your County Ag agent would know who has what.

    This is ours: http://www.ncagr.com/ncproducts/index.htm