How wooded is too wooded?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by MichelleB, Dec 23, 2005.

  1. MichelleB

    MichelleB Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    116
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2005
    Location:
    Oregon
    Will goats (meat breeds, mostly) do okay in a thick stand of Doug Fir? I've heard of goats clearing out lower limbs (less than 2" dia, of course) but what are the drawbacks (other than fencing issues, of course).
     
  2. goatkid

    goatkid Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,133
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2005
    Location:
    Montana
    I'm not sure about fir, but I've heard that eating pine needles can cause does to abort.
     

  3. crazygoatgirl

    crazygoatgirl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    155
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2004
    Location:
    N. Central Arkansas
    Pine needles do not hurt pregnant does at all. My goats have always had access to pines an dhave never had any trouble. I used to have a pine thicket that my does lived in and they didn't have any trouble. they loved eating pines.
     
  4. Teacupliz

    Teacupliz Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    697
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2003
    Location:
    Barker NY
    we give our does the christmas trees to eat each year- no problem. They will kill all the pine trees buy eating the bark. Liz
     
  5. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    9,246
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2005
    Location:
    Missouri
    Our goats love pine and cedar. No drawbacks that I can think of. I assume you are going to supplement with hay??
     
  6. Stacy Adams

    Stacy Adams Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    222
    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2003
    Her getting sick would all depend on if that's all she's getting to eat out there.. If you watch goats browse the woods, you would see them eating a little of this and a little of that, not just a ton of one thing. I'm sure if you checked out the woods around you though, you would see other things growing that the girls might like to nibble on.
    Stacy
     
  7. MichelleB

    MichelleB Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    116
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2005
    Location:
    Oregon
    Thanks for the replies.

    Their primary pasture area would be cleared ground, but I'd like to fence in part of the woods for them to help clear some of the understory--not much non-tree browse, but lots of lower, thin branches. Use of this area would require additional hay, but if I added it to the paddock rotation, it would probably allow for more growth in the better paddocks.

    I see now that I'd definitely have to watch out for barking on the trees!