How to tell an honest car salesman

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Jena, Nov 29, 2004.

  1. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    I love car shopping. Those salesmen are soooo stupid!

    I've been looking for a used vehicle, but with all the rebates, I figured I'd check out a new one. The new vehicles were marked $10,000 off MSRP. That's a good start....

    They said they'd give me pay-off for my trade-in, which is a very good deal since it books at $2500 below that....

    They asked what I wanted my payments to be. I said that was none of their business since I have my own financing. I guess they thought they could dazzle my blonde head into oblivion or something because they bring back a sheet with payment choices from $725-$570! Sheesh...the payments would have been less than $400 from my credit union.

    So I ask what interest rate that is. They don't know. Don't know??? What did they pull a number out of a hat???? They said my interest rate would vary by my credit, but then how can they tell me what my payments are?????

    I told them under NO circumstances would I use their financing. I got the "What's the problem? You can re-finance it after one payment!" I said, "I don't want too, don't need too and don't like someone trying to rip me off."

    Suddenly the price of the vehicle went back up, they offered $2000 less than book value on my trade, I said "Kiss my A**" and they showed me out. I wasn't mad, but I sure thought it was funny.

    I remember the day when you got to hash out the vehicle price, then the trade price, then financing...now they just want to lump it all together in a "deal". Jerks.

    Are people really that dumb?

    Do salesmen pull this crap on men too?

    Jena
     
  2. wy_white_wolf

    wy_white_wolf Just howling at the moon

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    They tried, but I wouldn't bite either and yes some (most) people are that dumb
     

  3. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    How do you tell is your car sales person is dis honest? Simple, their lips move.
     
  4. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    Way to go Jena! :haha: :haha:

    I broke out laughing when a salesman from a mortgage company called telling me that most financial advisors recommend taking out a home equity loan.
    It just struck me as funny and I couldn't stop laughing. Financial advisors recommend going deeper in debt? :haha:

    He hung up on me.
     
  5. ratherbefishin

    ratherbefishin Well-Known Member

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    try this-works beautifully and saves you a lot of hassle.[car salespeople hate it]
    you decide the vehicle you want, trade in or not[better to sell your own car first and have cash] then you tell the salesperson you are serious and you are going to buy the vehicle right now- if they come up with the right offer-to you.You tell them it will be a ''drop dead'' deal there will be no offers or negotiations-you will either write them a cheque-or you will walk out the door.Then you sit back and let them make the offer to you-after all you are the buyer aren't you?If they want to sell the vehicle- they know what their cost is and what they need to get for it- you don't have that information.That means they come in with their bottom dollar right away.Some professional salesmen will appreciate your honesty and do it your way-others will wheedle and try to get you to play the game.Try it- it cuts right to the chase, eliminates all the BS, and you get the car for what you want- or you go to the next dealer.
    I bought my last new van this way- told the guy what I wanted , and I wasn't interested in the horsetrading game.He wanted to know that I was serious and when I assured him I was, he said he would bring the vehicle in, and he wanted $500 to put the deal together[ the van was new]I paid $6000 less than the sticker price, took me 10 minutes and we were both happy.
     
  6. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ...............Every dollar that your payoff Exceeds the Wholesale value of your current vehicle , will be Added back onto the sales price of the New Vehicle . The american public has been dumbed Down by car\truck salesmen to just deal with the Monthly payment , completely Ignoring the Purchase Price , Administrative fees and add on(s) that just Screw the Customer because they(the buyer) are just TOO Lazy to sit down and negotiate a fair price and Argue with the Salesman . Personally , I never try to be the Salesman(s) buddy and I've made a few of them mad over the years by asking them Direct questions and demanding dierct answers . I'll either get a decent price or I'll move on down the road . fordy... :)
     
  7. Donovan K

    Donovan K Well-Known Member

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    Car dealers make more money in their slice of the financing package than they do on the markup on the car. Financing through the automakers financing program or through the dealerships secondary level financing brings in much more money than they can ever hope to make on just selling the car. Cash or self financed deals are considered losers for the dealership. Yes, they will still make money, but not nearly as much if they finance the deal for you.

    JMHO

    Donovan
     
  8. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    I have never had much skill when dealing with new car/truck salespeople.

    What's the deal with the 0% financing, is it true, how do you know?

    How can I tell what the price of my F150 Lariat super crew should be?

    Is there any help, or do I just have to wander in every few years and get completely taken advantage of?

    How can I get smarter and figure this game out?

    I read a book about it, then when it came time to get a new one last time, there I was, just as ignorant as ever. Must be some dazzled-by-the-truck mental block.

    I got to get it together somehow.

    Alex
     
  9. Bob_W_in_NM

    Bob_W_in_NM Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I'll think they'll try fast talking anybody, blonde or not. I think a lot of the problem is the buyer though. A lot of people don't care about the price, interest rate, length of contract, etc. Just how much are the "Saturday night payments" so to speak. If you think the salesmen are crooks, just wait 'til you get to the F & I (Finance and Insurance) guy (or gal). These are the car salesmen that "graduated" because they were exemplary crooks.

    I think car salesmen were a little more honest back thirty years ago, in general.

    There was a salesman in the Chevrolet dealership where I grew up years ago in Roswell, NM named Clovis Kaiser. 'Ol Clovis had a problem as far as the sales manager types were concerned. The man was impeccably honest. I never heard of the guy being anything but "straight up". A new sales manager would arrive on the scene and couldn't understand how Clovis could sell anything, but he consistently ranked among the top in sales performance. He won many awards from the Chevrolet Motor Division for sales performance and customer service. He was there before any of the "fast talkers" got there and was there after they all left. Who says it doesn't pay to be honest?
     
  10. AnnaS

    AnnaS Well-Known Member

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    I've been a used car sales(wo)man... but not that one!

    Everyone's right here- except if anyone thinks you're getting a good deal from the MSRP sticker- manufacturer can send dealers stickers with different MSRPs on them, you just need to have the right VIN. You can print them out right on your computer from the factory. So I was told- the dealership I worked at was mandated one-price and we didn't & couldn't do that. I've seen cars on the carrier with multiple MSRPs in the glove box too.

    It USED to be you could make back-end money with warranty and financing- until 0%. Then we got a flat rate of $200 per deal which is nothing. Warranty still paid.

    If they pulled your credit report, they know exactly what your interest rate would be- probably a good number or they would've said, "Yeah, go to your CU." A credit union will finance marginal credit that GMAC won't. If they got your SS# I bet they did your credit.

    For the value of any used car in your area, go to kbb.com This is the "blue book" you hear people talking about (actually a yellow book). Will give you the FAIR trade value of your car and a FAIR price for the dealership to sell you their used car. Remember the dealer is entitled to make a profit- they are a business, not the Red Cross- but they do not have the right to take you to the cleaner's. Print out the KBB reports and take them with you. If any salesman tries to talk KBB down, they are full of nitrogen rich fertilizer.

    And I just have to add my own unasked for, former honest car seller advice- financially, trading in a car that you are $2.5k upside down on is not a good money move. The bank will have to be paid somehow, either by you with cash (best way) or by the dealer that takes your trade and uses part of your loan money to pay it off- or jacks up the price of the car you are buying to cover it. If the payoff goes into your loan, you once again owe more than your car is worth- remember how the value of a car drops when you drive it off the lot? If you total that car in the first year you own it, you can be stuck with a loan and no car to go with it as your insurance co. will pay what it's worth, not what you owe.
    Ooh, I'm gettin' long-winded... :eek: :eek:
     
  11. ratherbefishin

    ratherbefishin Well-Known Member

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    another thing to watch for is the ''extended warenty'' .After buying my last car, I was ushered into the exteded warenty salesman's office and he proceeded to tell me why I needed to purchase ''extended warenty''-and listed all the terrible things that could go wrong with my brand new Tercel[ which has an excellent Consumer report repair record].I played along with the game and asked him if that was really true-and when he said it certainly was, I then reached for my cheque and said If that was the case, I didn't want the car!Talk about tripping over themselves backing up!The guy justsaid-''you aren't as dumb as you're making out to be are you?''[ I had deliberately gone in to the dealership in T shirt and jeans and asked very simple questions , and had played the ''drop dead '' deal- you're selling me the car, so you make the first and final offer to me, and I'll either write a cheque or get up and leave.]When I told the guy I was a professional salesman, he looked a little sick...had me pegged for the country bumpkin-exactly what I wanted him to think!!!Said he was only trying to make a living!!!!!
     
  12. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't have traded my car, but I have to have a different vehicle. I didn't want to hassle with selling it myself. I was upside down because I actually bought two cars last time and we played with numbers so only one had a lien on it to avoid additional insurance. The second car is a junky little truck I bought so my teen-aged daughter could be rated on something other than a sports car.

    In the end, we did bump the price up so my trade was "paid-off" to make the CU happy. I asked the salesperson to do this and he complied....the nice salesman I actually bought a car from. It may not be the smartest move, but at least I know exactly what I am doing...no surprises.

    I have bought 5 almost new cars in the last 4 years. That is a stupid financial move, but that is how it worked out. I intend to keep this one for a long time....

    Jena
     
  13. 3girls

    3girls Well-Known Member

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    Years ago, we bought a Dodge Crew Cab truck with a V-8, 386 Chrysler engine with 8 (count 'em, eight)miles to the gallon. Gasoline was .29/gal. We wrote down everything we wanted on the truck and sent out copies in the form of a letter asking for bids to about 30 dealers in the larger area. They all answered and the range in price was huge. I don't remember the numbers now; it was so long ago. We were very satisfied and drove that truck for ages. I hauled children, camping gear, you name it, all over the place. I wish I still had it.

    The next car we bought was from Avis. I drove it into the ground. We took very good care of our vehicles so they lasted a long long time. Next, my daughter gave me her car, as she was sent to Europe for what turned out to be 15 years, so far.
    I gave my Avis car to a nephew. I then drove the Buick around until my folks got too old to drive. I got their 1986 Dodge Caravan and gave the Buick away. I still drive it with 72000 true miles on it. It has hauled geese, ducks, chickens to slaughter, hay bales home, thousands of # of feed, etc. I will drive it until one of us dies.

    The point here is that we never allowed ourselves to get caught up in new car fever. A vehicle is something to get you from point A to point B, period. When you read of some of our castaways being driven in 3rd world places with hundreds of thousands of miles, you realize that with care, they will last a long time. You may have guessed that I don't put much store in OP opinions. If a vehicle meets my needs and is roadworthy, that's enough for me.
     
  14. ratherbefishin

    ratherbefishin Well-Known Member

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    the best way to get either a good truck or a good woman is the same.You look out for a good basic utility model, buy it brand new and keep it forever.Don't borrow one,lend it to friends , rent it or steal it.Don't buy a sports model, the maintenance is too high and someone will steal it off you.Give it the odd oil change and look after it.Keep it in a garage, nothing too fancy, but you don't want to leave it out in the cold- they don't start as well if you do.[another good tip- don't clutter up the garage with your junk, either, and always wipe your feet]
    After a while the springs get a bit soft, but I don't drive the way I used to anyway[ the truck I mean]We've hauled a lot of stuff, the truck and I,and driven a lot of rough roads, gone over highmountain passes and through the deserts, but we made it ,we're just content to go for sunday afternoon drives on nice days now , cause we realise we don't have a lot of sunny afternoons to left.
    everybody needs one good truck.....