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If you're attempting AI yourself it's essential to know when your doe is in heat. AI can be tricky and I believe still has not neared the success rate of nature's way. I've never tried it, so I bow to those who can relate their experiences.
But to your question, a doe in heat will flag (wag her tail), might become more friendly, ride other does or let does mount her. You may see discharge. Generally acting more restless. There are some does who are silent in heat as well. If you don't own a buck catching a doe in heat can often be very difficult.
And does may show heat symptoms but not ovulate. Some have backup heats 4-7 days after the initial one, where they don't ovulate on the first but do on the second.
Dont' have enough info on your situation to say whether or not it's practical.
 

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AI isn't practical if you don't have the knowledge yet on even heat....no way of saying that any nicer than that.

AI in goats is not as easy as other livestock...honestly without CIDR's it's hard to get your conception rate up in the 90% which is quite common in other livestock.

Even in herds with excellent conception rates, their pens are stocked with the best bucks...wonder why :) Vicki
 

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I'd say go get a cheap (but healthy) Buck from somewhere... not for breeding, but to keep in an adjacent pen to the does. When they're in heat, you'll know... They'll try to get to the buck, flag their tail in front of the fenceline... the buck will be going crazy, lol.
 

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I successfully AI'd the 2 does I attempted last year on natural heats.

The BIG trick to AI -- timing. You simply have to watch constantly -- you have to know pretty close to when the doe actually came into heat. You need to know how long it is average for *that* doe to stay in heat. You need to be able to time your AI as close as possible to the end of standing heat that you can. I'd like to try to use CIDRs on a few this year and tighten up that window some.

I wanted to do another doe last year, had it timed just right -- and then decided to live breed her because when testing her with an empty sheath, I could NOT get through her cervix. No way, no how. Not every doe is an AI candidate, so it's unrealistic IMO to think you can get completely away from having a live buck.

It is however, worth the effort because you can use bucks that you'd never have access to otherwise. That said, just because a buck has been collected, doesn't necessarily mean you should use him ;) I only want to use bucks that are better than those standing in my pens.

Tracy
 

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I know when my alpines are in heat. My lamanchas? Never. They don't get noisy, they don't wag, they don't do anything. However, I have a new weapon, not sure how this happened.. do goats go through menopause? I have an 11 year old doe I "retired" last year. Seems she knows when the girls are in heat - she has started doing this silly "buck in rut" routine whenever any of the other goats is (I'm guessing) in heat. I haven't started breeding, won't until next month, but I'll post back to see if she's actually pointing out the does who are ready to breed.
 
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