How to support a high deck?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by lilyrose, Sep 11, 2005.

  1. lilyrose

    lilyrose Well-Known Member

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    We're considering building a high deck off our house. It will have a high end (14 feet) because the yard slopes. We need to secure tall posts onto the slope, secure enough to support the weight of the deck. Has anyone here done this sort of thing before?

    If we didn't have so much height involved this would seem simpler. Since it's so high we may build a shed under the flatter part. Anyone have plans or ideas on how to do this?
     
  2. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    first you have to secure your face board to the joist or top plate with lag bolts 4x4 will be hardy enough to secure the high part dig down to frost line put in quick tubs fill with concreat then place in the middle 4x4 bracket they will have a point at the end that goes into the concreat when they set uo through bolt your 4x4 to it makeing shure they are level then frame the top 6x6 throught bolt them allso set your joist hangers in at 16 center lay your joist in naik put your decking in and have a party
     

  3. Darren

    Darren Still an :censored:

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    There's several books on building pole type structures including decks. Tractor Supply outlets usually stock them or you can buy them used through www.bookfinder.com . With a 14' height you'll need something heavier for those sections. I still recommend the marine grade CCA treated lumber. You can also get piling treated to that spec. You'll never have to worry about the columns rotting out in your lifetime.

    If you live near the East coast I can get you the phone numbers of several places that stock the 2.5 lb CCA treated lumber. Normally it's sold for building bulkheads and docks in salt water but no one checks on what you're going to use it for. I can call the yard in NJ to order the lumber and then use a local trucker to pick it up at the treatment plant in VA and deliver it to me in WV.
     
  4. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A problem: Decks require gaps between the boards so the floor doesn't rot. A shed below needs a solid roof below to keep it dry. Going to have to work that out somehow........

    Anyhow, concrete tubes below frost line with the right hardware imbedded in the concrete to bolt on the beams, 4x4 posts up from there, perhaps some 2x cross bracing (big X's) for the real tall spots. As mentioned by others.

    Actually as poor as wood is these days, get 3 2x6's, glue & lag them together & make your own 6x6 beams - this is stronger & straighter & usually cheaper that solid wood these days....

    --->Paul
     
  5. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    you dont have to space the boards anymore ther is no such thing as kiln dried it will skrink to gap the only thing at that height you will need a landing half way down the stairs then changs direction they will shake to much comming down from that height
     
  6. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ..................Dig your post holes about 3 feet deep x 12 inches in diameter . set 3inch od. pipe and plumb for square and leave about 1 foot above ground. Buy the next smaller size pipe (probably 2 1\2 inch od) that will slide\telescope INside the 3 inch . fabricate some flat (say 8" x 8 ") , square 1\4 inch steel plates and weld to the top of the smaller pipe . Lay a 2x8 across these on all three sides just like they were suspended in the air and level UP by sliding the smaller pipe(s) . weld the smaller pipe to the larger pipe and your ready to start building . fordy... :rock: