how to stick build rafters to ceiling/floor joists

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by ginnie5, Dec 5, 2006.

  1. ginnie5

    ginnie5 wife,mom,taxi driver,cook Supporter

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    we're adding on and doing everything ourselves...this is the next step we;re at and kinda floundering....any pictures would be appreciated also.

    Thanks!

    edited now that I know exactly what he's wondering about......how much overhang does a rafter have to have? you know the eave part?
     
  2. papaw

    papaw Well-Known Member

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  3. VALENT

    VALENT Well-Known Member

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    The rafter does not have to have any overhang. Normally, on a remodel/add on project you will match the existing eave.
     
  4. Macybaby

    Macybaby I love South Dakota Supporter

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    What ever you do, DON'T do what some previous owners of our place did LOL!!

    [​IMG]

    We knew the roof was not real stable, but had not realized the problem until we removed the ceiling underneath. Our solution was to replace all the 2x4 ceiling joists with 2x6 butted up to the rafters, and firmly attaching them with glue (where the rafters were cracked), nails and joist hangers.

    [​IMG]

    The roof is no longer spongy! This is just one of the surprises we found in out old house.

    As to overhang, we normally go with a 24" overhang. That seems to give a nice amount of summer shade. However, in most of our rebuilding of this house, we were limited because of the low ceilings. We came out as far as we could so that the overhang is right above the level of the window casing.

    This picture sort of shows the underside of the overhang.

    [​IMG]

    The house originally had about 8" (no venting) and we extended it to about 18" on this end. Yes, our house has different size overhangs, and as long as both sides of the roof match, it does not seem to matter. We also have several different pitches of roof too . . .


    This shows how the overhang just clears the top of the windows.

    [​IMG]

    And in case you are wondering, this is what the house currently looks like (after over two years, and lots more to come)

    [​IMG]


    Cathy (who loves to show her house pictures)
     
  5. ginnie5

    ginnie5 wife,mom,taxi driver,cook Supporter

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    thanks all! And especially you Cathy! He's got the code book and has helped on building a house years ago but has forgotten alot. We're doing a 2 story addition and trying to make sure we've got enough space in those 2 upstairs rooms. He was thinking he might need to go with 18ft rafters instead of 16's. He's not to the stage yet to put them up but he had it in his head that he needed to figure that out this morning. He's outside working so I guess he's figured it out!
     
  6. Farmer Willy

    Farmer Willy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'd agree, the most pleasing look will be having the new work mesh with the old. The complicated answer is it will depend on the latitude of your building site.
    A general goal is to have the angle of the sun be able to enter the house during the cold winter months both for solar gain and lighting, and not be able to enter during the summer, adding heat to the house. Clear as mud eh?
     
  7. rzrubek

    rzrubek Flying Z

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    Check your building codes before you start. In some places you cannot build your own trusses.
     
  8. TNHermit

    TNHermit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You got to be pretty old to know that. i don't think 90% of the carpenters today ever heard of that :)
     
  9. Farmer Willy

    Farmer Willy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Older than dirt some folks say. Older than my teeth but younger than my 'stache.
    Just a sign of the times I think, most building today is based on the nominal dimensions of materials. Sad to think most of the old craftsmen have died off.
    My dad and uncle taught me how to cut rafters when I was still a young kid
    Must be in the blood, most of my kin have been in the trades for generations. The old German crest for our family name has a hammer in it.
     
  10. TNHermit

    TNHermit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Did they teach you how to figure latitude. LOL Lot of the young guys are amazed when I draw a circle with a framing square. There was a legend when i was yong that a good carpenter could figure his taxes on a framing square, :) Most don't know that there are 8 tables instead of 7 on a good square :goodjob: :goodjob:
     
  11. Farmer Willy

    Farmer Willy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Nah, took the Army to teach me latitude.