How to Remove a Dead Tree With a Poison Ivy Vine Attached

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Rick, Jun 3, 2008.

  1. Rick

    Rick Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hi

    We would like to take down a dead 10 inch tree. The tree has a very well developed 3 inch poison ivy vine growing clear to the top.

    I can kill the bottom 15 to 20 feet or so with a round-up type spray. What about the part I can't spray? I've been told burning will put the oils into the air, and that sawing through the vine will spread the oils also, for a long time after the vine is cut.

    The only thing I can think of is to fell the tree, and make as few cuts as I can to roll it into the woods that sit 20 feet away from the tree, and then spray (or inject?) the herbicide.

    Has anyone dealt with this?

    Rick
     
  2. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    Yup, I used a chain saw and cut both the vine and the tree down. Then I reached around it with my chain and pulled it up front.

    I am telling you how NOT to do it.

    I am not (historically) very sensitive to urushiol, but after atomizing it (with the chain saw), wrapping my hoodie-covered arms around it (it was cold at the time) and then wearing the hoodie for a day or two after...

    I had the worst case of Poison Ivy I've every seen on anyone on my arms and face. (I have a habit of wiping my brow with my forearm). I still have scars on my forearm from what that stuff did to my arm.

    So take it as a "how not to".
     

  3. Old Vet

    Old Vet In Remembrance

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    You can cut the vine near the root and let dry this summer then cut it in the fall. That way the vine is dead and dried out. Then you can cut the tree and rool it up and put it whever you want it and probily not get poision ivy if you
    wash well after touching the vine.
     
  4. WayneR

    WayneR Well-Known Member

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    It should be possible to cut the large "hairy" vine without contaminating yourself. An old junk handsaw is a possibility. Cut at ground level and several feet above that. Use the saw as a wedge under one end, and peel the vine off of the trunk with newspaper to prevent direct contact.

    That will give you a clear space to use the chainsaw, with relative safety.

    You are actually a tree surgeon and should dress for surgery. Disposable coveralls, mask, gloves, shoe covers, etc. Think through the proceedure in advance (even practice it first) to protect you from contaminating yourself.

    Usherol is a hazardous material and you must treat it as such.
     
  5. Nellie

    Nellie Well-Known Member

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    Don't just go yanking it down from the tree, either. My dh did that with poison oak. He thought it was just "vines". This was AFTER we had walked through our woods and I had pointed out to him where the poison oak was. I was a bad wife. I laughed.
     
  6. Oggie

    Oggie Waste of bandwidth Supporter

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    If you know someone who isn't allergic to poison ivy, could you offer to trade chores for something they need done?

    They would still need to take precautions against exposure to the itchy oils but they're probably less likely to get a rash.

    If you are sensitive, you are almost guaranteed that you'll get it.

    I'm sensitive and, when I needed to remove an inch-thick vive from a detached garage, I sprayed it with Roundup and waited a month to pull it down. I dressed in old clothes, including a windbreaker, from head to toe. Then, I threw the clothes away. I still got a rash.

    Two years later, I dug fence post holes near the garage. Some of the dirt got into my shoes and I got a rash.
     
  7. wildhorse

    wildhorse Well-Known Member

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    We just cut them down and let it die. I normally use a weed eater on the ivy thats coming up...I keep jewel weed handy and put a bit of clorox in my bath water after I deal with it.what ever you do don't burn it. wear an over shirt and gloves but dont wash them with the normal laundry instead let them hang outside for a few days in the sun then wash them.
     
  8. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    Oh, just a note, I am not "allergic" to Poison Ivy and I typically pull it with bare hands. So, anywhoo...
     
  9. Oggie

    Oggie Waste of bandwidth Supporter

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    It seems as though, if I see poison ivy, I already have the rash.
     
  10. Gary in ohio

    Gary in ohio Well-Known Member Supporter

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    find yourself a llama or sheet and let them eat the ivy down.
     
  11. Use Less

    Use Less Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Don't try to find somebody who isn't allergic. Many people who have lived years w/o any problems do become sensitive after a while. My mother is one; at age 28. I'd use big branch cutters and cut the vine in a few places, clean the cutters with alcohol or bleach, leave the tree standing for a couple of years. Could spray with Round Up, too. The oils can stay active for that long. Never burn. Sue
     
  12. Danaus29

    Danaus29 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Poison ivy never used to bother me, until some idiot who shall remain nameless picked up the plastic bag I had put pulled poison ivy into and threw it on a fire he had burning. My face was swollen so bad people thought I had been beat up.

    Anyway, best way to get rid of the vine is cut out a 2 or 3 foot section (hand saw or long handled lopping shears, I recommend the long handled lopping shears), pull off the cut section (use the lopping shears for that), and paint the bottom cut end with full strength Brush-B-Gone concentrate. Do not dilute for this use. Wait a couple weeks for the top to dry before cutting the dead tree. The Brush-B-Gone is to keep the plant from resprouting from the roots, which it will do.
     
  13. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    i would wack it low to the ground with an axe or a machette. take a section of the vine out with two cuts so there is a space between the ends of the cut vine. i have had big poison ivy vines heal after i cut them but left the cut edges touching. let the vine die this summer as someone else said and cut the tree in the fall. if you could leave the tree where it falls, you could cut it now or in the fall just so you can get in to cut it without touching the vine. either way it will take a while for the vine to rot free from the tree to the point where you can knock it away from the trunk. those hairy things on the vine can penetrate pretty deep into the bark depending on what kind of tree it is. some trees are pretty good about shedding all of their bark at once when they die and that makes removing the dead vines much easier. trees like black locust and maple shed bark in sheets. whatever you do remember that poison ivy oils can be dangerous for a year on clothing and such that has not been washed, so i assume it can last as long in a vine that is not rotten yet.

    i doubt spraying any of the vine before you prune it will be anything more than a waste of time and money. you will be spraying the pruned crown for years to come as it is. without getting all of the foliage, spraying is futile.
     
  14. scorpian5

    scorpian5 Well-Known Member

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    You can burn it if you are careful but you have to kill it first and let the vine dry out. We just used a shovel to cut the vine let it die till the leaves are all dried up make a mixture of used oil and a little gas give the vine a heavy coat. We used a hand sprayer, and make sure nobody else is around light and run. it Did not get the very top of the vine but it cleared enough for us to cut the tree safely.
     
  15. Tricky Grama

    Tricky Grama Well-Known Member

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    I will never again complain about the small itchy bumps I sometimes get from pulling down poison ivy vines.
    Never allergic to it until we bought property w/acres of it. Vines so big I thought they were trees.
    I'm able to climb up in a tree that has it thrughout & saw it off, then burn it. I can snip it at the ground & mow it. I get only a few itchy weepy bumps & not always. Caladryl takes care of it.
    Rick-if I was anywhere near you, I'd trade chores! Good luck.

    Patty
     
  16. lwj2

    lwj2 Well-Known Member

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    DO NOT, I say again DO NOT use a chain saw.

    Use a pruning saw or a crosscut buck saw. A fast-moving chain saw will atomize the oils and spread them everywhere -- including your eyes and lungs.

    Really bad idea.

    Wear a Tyvek coverall, a hat, gloves and a face mask that's NIOSH rated. When you're done, throw them all away. Wash down immediately with isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol -- it breaks down the urushiol. Then take a shower.

    The base can be painted with straight Roundup. This will kill it down to the roots. If it even thinks of looking green, paint it again.

    All you need to do initially is cut a six to twelve inch section out of the main root/stem, then paint the ends with Roundup. Wait for it to kill the poison ivy, then drop the tree.

    Do not burn the tree.

    Good luck!
     
  17. Annsni

    Annsni Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm another one that wasn't allergic to poison ivy. I used to pull it bare-handed all the time. But then one year in doing the gardening, I apparently got a small cut and the oil got in the cut. Yep - kind of like injecting it into my system. I had NO clue what it was when it turned up but now I know and every episode results in a trip to the doctor and steroids. :(

    I have some I have to get out of the garden. I was realizing I should have timed it with my last dermatologist visit. Oh well.
     
  18. Rick

    Rick Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Patty

    You are a peach!
     
  19. Rick

    Rick Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'd like to thank everyone who took the time to warn me. Ann already had the case of poison Ivy on the face from a burning vine (night-time campfire), and another case on her arms requiring pampers to contain the weeping- so we'll proceed patiently.

    We'll pry off some vine and paint everything liberally with the herbacide. We thought the vine could put roots in the upper part of the tree and survive. If this kills the plant, then we can wait until Fall or next Spring.

    I will take the precautions of disposable- or special handling clothing.

    Thanks again.

    Rick
     
  20. Rick

    Rick Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Gary

    Can I borrow your Llama for the weekend?