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Whoa, wait a minute. You appear to be in Montana and not in the Southern states. All the first responders live in the South.

While you call them 8 foot, I am thinking frost cycle. They could be 3 or more feet in the ground to get below the heaving frozen ground. Here in Wisconsin 3 feet would be minimum depth to keep the post from moving around and coming up on their own. You might need to put them back into the ground the same distance they came out.

For tractors with out loader, instead of trying to tie a chain to the 3pt arm up close the rear tires, I use an implement to extend my reach a little bit and to give a better place to attach the chain. Usually it's the small 3pt field cultivator but have used the scoop bucket. The field cultivator is made from angle iron so easy to wrap the chain. Because it is extended out a little bit from the pitvot point of the 3pt arm, the lift is a greater distance each time.

If I had a 3pt plow, I might try that to lift with.
 

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Yes you still need to bury them that deep. They are less likely to push out the ground if they had the weight of a building on top of them. But you are just using them as fence post. Ask a local farmer how deep wooden corner fence post need to be driven into the ground. I don't know how deep the frost goes in your area. Otherwise the freeze thaw cycle will push the post up out of the ground.

I cheat the three foot minimum for my fence post because at 18 to 24 inches I hit limestone bedrock. So I place a half a dozen big galvanized nails near the bottom of the post, then add a bag of dry concret mix and fill in remainder with dirt/clay crap. I pretend the nails are mini rebar for the concrete to hold on to since concrete does not bond to wood. Make sure you brace the post for awhile and soak the ground with water to set the concrete. Use a level to set the post upright on both sides.

You can't really stretch chicken wire. I would run a top rail between the post and start by stapling across the top rail with 48" wide poultry fencing. Staple down the rails. Then you will need a second row (roll) to fill in the bottom area, but 48" will be too wide so some amount will lay against the ground. This is good. Cover that with dirt if you like. That area on the ground keep raccoons from digging in to the run.

try that?
 

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Bearfootfarm,
Great photo!

I agree you could build a wall on the ground and then just stand it up. If you are starting with all new materials and the ground was relatively level. However could not be a very long wall. The weight of 4x4 treated post would keep you from lifting too long of a wall unless you have a large group of people available to lift it up with out twisting the structure. You would also have to cut the 4x4's shorter than the 8 foot (I hate the thought of that).

Six foot wide poultry netting is not commonly available in my area. I suppose you can order it. I like the idea of having some of the fencing material lying on the ground or buried outside the coop to keep bad things from digging in. Of course they can climb over if other measure are not taken like a electric wire or a fenced in roof.
 
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