how to make real buttermilk?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Doc, Jul 31, 2004.

  1. Doc

    Doc Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have access to whey and I thought I'd try making real buttermilk. Anyone have a recipe, suggestions, sources?
     
  2. renee7

    renee7 Well-Known Member

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    Doc, you need real milk to make real buttermilk.

    Actually, you take whole milk, let it sour. Churn it. Take the butter off. and what you've got is real buttermilk.

    However, if you can get some real milk. I like it, to put about a cup of buttermilk from the store in it. (I know, that's cheating) let it set a day or 2, and it makes real good buttermilk
     

  3. Grandmotherbear

    Grandmotherbear Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Preferably Friendship buttermilk with active cultures. I shake up a quart of skim powder milk and add a cup of friendship and let sit 4-5 hours. Active yogurt cultures will do if thats all you have but it won't tatste the same.
     
  4. Shrek

    Shrek Singletree Moderator Staff Member

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    I "real culture " mine from powdered milk . 1 gallon of powdered milk, 1 cup of buttermilk culture, leave out overnight loose capped, shake and refrigerate in the morning.
     
  5. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    Herself makes butter from our Jersey two or three times a week. I sneak a glass of the butter milk when I can but she pokes me in my big belly with her finger and I take the hint. Good butter milk ranks right up there with single malt in my estimation, but alas, that's another drink Herself doesn't let me have too often.
     
  6. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    What is a friendship culture?
    Booboo
     
  7. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    What is buttermilk culture?
    Also,can you just flake some butter into it after its done the culture route?
    I'd like to try this.
    Also,with my electric butter churn,can I possibly get any butter from 2% milk?
    BooBoo
     
  8. seaweed

    seaweed Well-Known Member

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    I love buttermilk! My understanding was it was the liquid left over after you've made butter. So if you collect thick cream & churn it into butter, you will have sweet buttermilk & if you culture the cream before you make the butter, you will end up with cultured buttermilk. I had some fresh sweet jersey buttermilk with maple syrup once. I agree it ranks up there with single malt!

    If you have access to whey, have you thought of making some gjetost ? takes ages but is very tasty.
     
  9. Shrek

    Shrek Singletree Moderator Staff Member

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    The cultured buttermilk from the store. I used to buy discounted powdered milk from the salvaged groceries for $1 a box and buy a small carton of buttermilk for 40 cents out of the machine at work and make a gallon or two. Now I have to buy a pint at the store to use as a culture. My father told me I could also start a culture by adding lemon juice and warm water to start the enzyme actions, but I always used the buttermilk as a culture.
     
  10. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Shrek,I will give it a try next week and let you all know what happens.I only drink buttermilk :worship: ,cant do the thin regular stuff :no:
    Does it wind up tasting just like the Buttermilk you started it with?Prices are pretty high here,sounds like I could save a buck,always a good thing.
    BooBoo
     
  11. Doc

    Doc Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The buttermilk that I get says "cultured nonfat milk", but there are no cultures listed. And it doesn't taste like the real thing, either. We can't get Friendship buttermilk in this area, but I'd like to. Wouldn't active cultures be important?

    Churning -- if you don't have a churn (I have only a blender), how long are we talking about churning?

    Also: there was an article in the paper last year about a woman who put cream in a plastic bottle, put it in her dryer and tumbled it long enough to make butter. There were no specifics so I haven't tried it, but she swore by it.
     
  12. westbrook

    westbrook In Remembrance

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    a blender works right nice! put whippine cream in blender (real cream if you have it!) on low and in 5-10 mionutes...butter! press the butter and what you get is buttermilk. Be ssure to wash the butter. Run cold water over the butter and press to get out all butter milk. The more you get out the longer the butter will last without spoiling.

    No you don't get little yellow chunks of butter...butter isn't yellow until it has been dyed.

    Even if you use a starter from store bought buttermilk, it gets very thick almost like yoghurt.

    I haven't had buttermilk in 2 years! I was doing just fine thank you very much until I read this thread! Oh how I am craving a good cold glass of buttermilk!

    um no on the single malt...but right up there with fine chocolate! oh now you have done it! I am craving a Chocolate buttermilk cake with Chocolate buttermilk frosting!

    Now stop talking about buttermilk! just stop it!
     
  13. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    ok, there are two kinds of buttermilk. the first is the whey, that is left over from whipping, fresh cream into milk. Then, you have the cultured, that you buy in the store. you can make that , by adding a cup of cultured butter milk to a gal of milk, and let it set lut until it gets thick. and the taste is what you want, add a dash of salt , and you have it. you can also, get the buttermilk culture, from any cheese supplier. to use instead of the bought butter milk.
     
  14. Sarah J

    Sarah J Well-Known Member

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    The culture itself is a specific set of *bacteria* that grows in the milk to give it the unique flavor that we're all familiar with. You can buy buttermilk culture from health food stores or cheesemaking suppliers and add it to warm milk and let it do its thing. Or you can culture your own using store-bought cultured buttermilk milk like the suggestions of the others above. Culturing milk is very similar to making yogurt if you've ever tried that.

    Taking thick cream and churning it into butter leaves true buttermilk, uncultured and sweet. You can culture this, but it won't be the same as the stuff that you buy at the store.

    As for making butter itself, churning it is easy. If you don't have a churn, you can use the electric mixer or blender on low (and I mean LOW or you'll end up with *whipped* cream!) or if you're like me and don't OWN a mixer or blender, pour the cream into a pint or quart jar. The size you use will be dependent on how much cream you're churning - the cream should be half of the full capacity of the jar you use. Be sure the cream is at *least* 60 degrees before you start - warmer is better...I like room temperature sicne it goes faster. Higher temperatures can cause problems.

    Put a good lid on the jar and start shaking it vigorously. It's fun to have several people to pass it around to as each person's arms start to get tired! You will get to a stage where it is thick and doesn't seem to be shaking itself around the jar anymore...KEEP GOING! You're almost there! Pretty soon (like a minute or so) it will start to shake again as the butter separates from the milk. Keep going until it forms into a good chunk and seems to be all separated out.

    Pour your new buttermilk into a container and store it in the fridge for making pancakes, waffles, muffins, and all sort of yummy bread recipes. The butter is exactly that - sweet cream butter. Run cold water over it and rinse the butter several times, kneading it with either a clean hand or a spoon (or a butter paddle!). Keep rinsing and kneading until the water runs clear. Knead some salt into it, if you desire (store bought butter normally contains salt if it doesn't specifically say unsalted) and drain any left-over water out. Pop it into the fridge, put it in a jar of ice water, use it immeditaely, you ge the idea.

    If you used unpastuerized cream it will keep for about a week in the cold. If it was store-bought cream or pastuerized cream it'll keep longer. It freezes well, too.

    Sarah
     
  15. Doc

    Doc Well-Known Member Supporter

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    What started this thread was my asking about using whey as the base for buttermilk. We've come full circle. I actually would prefer not to make the cultured kind since I know how it tastes. I want to use the whey.

    If I take cream, put it in a blender and make it into butter, then what's left over is whey -- buttermilk??? You know, I've learned a lot from this thread, but I'm still confused about the whey-buttermilk connection. Anyone care to clarify?!!
     
  16. Sarah J

    Sarah J Well-Known Member

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    Whey is not the same as buttermilk. Whey is what is left-over after the curds form from cheese-making. Cultured buttermilk is made with whole milk, or even sometimes skim milk, but not whey. When you make *butter* the left-over stuff is different and is called real buttermilk. But whey and buttermilk are two different things.

    As far as I know there *is* no connection between whey and buttermilk.

    However, if you're interested in knowing what you can do with the WHEY that you have access to, you can make riccota cheese. Feel free to let me know if you'd like those instructions. :)

    Sarah
     
  17. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    Aye, buttermilk from making butter, whey from making cheese. Let milk sour (not that store bought stuff but real milk) and you'll have curds and whey like Little Miss Muffet and the whey in this case is delightful as are the curds.

    On butter not being yellow until it is dyed? Ours is plenty yellow, yellow like cheese and then some, and we don't and won't dye it.
     
  18. Doc

    Doc Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Sarah, Just so happens I love ricotta. Indeed, please share your recipe. Thanks.

    There is a dairy three miles away -- uses glass bottles and the milk is delicious. I use it to make yogurt all the time. I'm going to use it for all this buttermilk making, too.

    The whey comes from neighbors who own a dairy and make cheese. But they give the whey to their pigs (maybe they have so much of it).
     
  19. Sarah J

    Sarah J Well-Known Member

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    Yes - you end up with *almost as much whey* as you started with milk when you separate out the curds. That's a lot of whey and their's still quite a bit of nutrition in it!

    Ricotta is so easy. Simply put the whey into a clean stock pot (preferably a huge double boiler, but I don't have one and they are hard to find over 2 quarts). I usually make 4 gallon batches of cheese so tend to be using about 3 1/2 gallons of whey.

    Heat the whey up to 185* - just before it starts simmer. Add 1/4 cup apple cider vinegar and stir it in thoroughly. In a minute or two you will see white specks beginning to form in the whey. Turn off the heat and slowly drain the whey through a collander lined with a cheesecloth. You can save the whey to feed back to animals or just dump it down your drain.

    Let them drain for 10 - 15 minutes and then tie up the ends of the cheese cloth and hang it over the sink. Allow the curds to drain until they don't drip anymore - sometimes up to 2 - 3 hours. Salt the curds to taste, herb them, or eat them plain. Any way you like it, they'll last for up to a week in the refrigerator (though not always) and will freeze very nicely. My family loves it with dill mixed in!

    Sarah
     
  20. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    I believe that butter from a holstein will be light in color, and butter from a jersey will be yellow.