Homesteading Forum banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am having a problem with raccoons. We had 40 chickens that free range and then roost in a 1/3 acre pen at night. The pen has electric fencing at the top and bottom of the fence and it is HOT!! The coons are super-coons. Apparently the shock doesn't hurt that bad. They keep climbing 1 tree and we have hot wires that tree into a tangled mess, so there is no way they aren't getting shocked. I am now down to 1 rooster, from 40 chickens total. Is there anything else I can do to keep the coins out? I just bought 17 pullets and am afraid to let them out of their little cage. We are only at the ranch in the weekends, so it is hard to pen them up at night during the week. We can't afford an automatic door closer yet either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
507 Posts
well now that their accustomed to the slight shock ---try plugging the wires into your stove receptacle :) j/k j/k j/k
well now that you've got them used to the buffet you've provided --id suggest one last serving of chicken ,then maybe kill that rascal b4 getting more chickens :(
im sure the coons will open the automatic door ya buy anyways :(
any chance theres a neighbor near the property thatd be willing to cage them up nightly & release them in the mornings ? im guessing their to busy to do it --maybe their kids ?
honestly though id suggest not t waste your time with an all ya can eat buffet --until you live there & can kill the rouges
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
16,527 Posts
We did well with a dog with a high prey drive. He simply loved staring at raccoons and possums and, in general, making their lives miserable. He was a Brittany, which is a pointing breed.

Thankfully, he accepted that chickens were off the menu: I would not trust my current dog at all!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,508 Posts
I've never seen that electric had much effect on raccoons. Maybe electric netting, with nothing that they could climb on, any where around it. They can still take a pretty good jolt, and don't seem to have a real aversion to it.

Trapping works, but you have to catch a lot. 25 or 30 is not out of the question, depending on location. If you want to free range chickens, be prepared to either trap some chicken predators or have a good dog that hates coons and doesn't kill chickens. If either of those things does not fit in your management plan, be prepared to provide a solidly fenced enclosure, with a maximum 2"x4" wire opening size, either buried in the ground all the way around, or folded out in a skirt to prevent dig unders.
Once a coon has established a food source, don't be surprised if he finds a weak link in your chicken containment system.
 

·
Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....?
Joined
·
78,895 Posts
You need to build an actual coop with solid walls instead of relying only on a fence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,674 Posts
I controlled mine with a friends coon dogs. He ran them ever few nights. Then I set live traps. Opossum will take chickens too!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,133 Posts
we have a breeding pair of LGD Maremma.
she is due to have puppies in mid June.
they both are chicken friendly,.
One rooster even sleeps in the dog house with Frankie..
I don't have to close the chicken coop door.
the dogs don't make any effort to be pals with the chickens, but just them being around discourages any four legged visitors..

.......jiminwisc........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
389 Posts
just being there on the weekends is a huge prob. if you have a huge coon population then yu will never get ahead of them.possums also are a huge prob. unless you can be there to protect and trap 7 days a week you are not going to win.

they will get in yur coop and kill. skunks will dig and get to them also.

i dont even try to have chickens anymore untill i build a better coop.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,985 Posts
The pen has electric fencing at the top and bottom of the fence and it is HOT!! Apparently the shock doesn't hurt that bad. They keep climbing 1 tree and we have hot wires that tree into a tangled mess, so there is no way they aren't getting shocked. .
You do realize it takes to things to make a electric fence work----ground and hot. How are you setting up a tree where they get grounded and hit the hot wire at the same time?? If you got it set-up proper and a Shock box with some HEAT----they want come back for more. One like this will get their attention if set-up right. https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/american-farmworks-black-diamond-75-mile-ac-low-impedance-charger?cm_vc=-10005
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks everyone for the advice. We do have that exact hot box. We made some modifications to the tree this weekend. We put tin around the tree so it is more difficult to climb. I know raccoons can climb anything, but if we are trying to make it more slippery. Then we ran alternating strands of hot wire and ground wires around the tree. So if the raccoons chooses to climb the wires it will eventually grab a ground and a hot and zap! Also the tin is run way above the height of the fence, so they will hopefully slide down into a hot wire as well. And we made sure to ground the tin to the non electrified part of the fence. So....wish me luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,508 Posts
My experience with coons and electric indicates the harder you shock them the faster they blow through it the next time. I observed them at a commercial fish farm. There was electric wire spaced 4 inches, alternating hot and ground with a hot charger. They would roll out of the water with a fish in their mouth, maybe growl and fumble the fish, but when they came in dry, they just blew on through.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
749 Posts
I've heard a lot of people around my area make a cocktail call "Croka-Cola" You mix this fly bate with some Coke in a pie dish and supposedly the coons and possum won't move 4ft before they're dead.

If i didnt have dogs or cats, I'd have it out 24/7
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
I have a solid wall coop within a fully fenced enclosure including roof and buried sides, little bastard bent the wire to get in took out two of my girls on the third night I heard the scream and ran out with a crossbow after a bolt to the head I've been raccoon free for a year now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,508 Posts
Mixing fly bait for killing coons is irresponsible and illegal. It might be effective, if one gets enough to die a slow agonizing death. If they don't get enough, they will just be sick for a while, and then recover, partially. The bad part is, if one of your animals gets in it, then it is subjected to the same fate. There are too many good options available to deal with something as easy to deal with as raccoons, without subjecting yourself to potential prosecution, subjecting your animals to a horrible death, or subjecting raccoons to a horrible death.

If you ever saw a coon that had been poisoned in this manner, and didn't get quite enough, you would know that it is not a good way to go. I mean, killing them is one thing, but if you are too lazy to take the proper precautions to secure your chickens, there is no need to torture them to death.

It's all fun and games until your neighbor's dog gets into some or there is a big eagle with a tracking device on him from the game department laying next to the dead coon he was eating. Then stuff gets real in a hurry, but you'll get to meet lots of nice folks from the game department, US Fish and Wildlife and the EPA, just after they go talk to the folks at the local feed store.
 
  • Like
Reactions: aart

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,372 Posts
You need to build an actual coop with solid walls instead of relying only on a fence.
I'm afraid Bearfootfarm is right. The birds need a secure place to roost at night. Sometimes there are no compromises that will work, and to keep them from predators, poultry need an on-site caretaker - not just weekends - or you're just asking to lose them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,508 Posts
I'm afraid Bearfootfarm is right. The birds need a secure place to roost at night. Sometimes there are no compromises that will work, and to keep them from predators, poultry need an on-site caretaker - not just weekends - or you're just asking to lose them.
There is poultry that could handle free range and no full time onsite caretaker. There are breeds that don't feel inclined to roost all in one big clump, they roost 40 feet up, and fly out when they hear bark scraping. You can still expect to lose some, but not anything like the ones that have been dumbed down. It depends on what your reason for chickens is, these wilder breeds don't lay a lot of eggs, and don't usually get huge. But they will still do better if you provide some basic predator control.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
749 Posts
Mixing fly bait for killing coons is irresponsible and illegal. It might be effective, if one gets enough to die a slow agonizing death. If they don't get enough, they will just be sick for a while, and then recover, partially. The bad part is, if one of your animals gets in it, then it is subjected to the same fate. There are too many good options available to deal with something as easy to deal with as raccoons, without subjecting yourself to potential prosecution, subjecting your animals to a horrible death, or subjecting raccoons to a horrible death.

If you ever saw a coon that had been poisoned in this manner, and didn't get quite enough, you would know that it is not a good way to go. I mean, killing them is one thing, but if you are too lazy to take the proper precautions to secure your chickens, there is no need to torture them to death.

It's all fun and games until your neighbor's dog gets into some or there is a big eagle with a tracking device on him from the game department laying next to the dead coon he was eating. Then stuff gets real in a hurry, but you'll get to meet lots of nice folks from the game department, US Fish and Wildlife and the EPA, just after they go talk to the folks at the local feed store.
I completely agree, just wanted to give advise from what I've heard and up until recently it was completely legal in our state.

I wouldn't do it because of our domestic animals but also because i enjoy when a family of 10-12 coons dine out in an apple tree at night. Always fun to put a box of ammo through the 20ga

But also keep in mind that in many states it's illegal to live trap or kill trap certain animals during certain parts of the year. So even the advice of setting cage traps might be just as illegal if the OP doesn't do their due diligence to research their respective state game laws.

Fortunately in the lovely state of Michigan i can kill coons, possum, and coyote year round as a private land owner. But if i catch a red fox, mink, weasel, etc in my traps, I'm in pretty deep sh!t if it's not released/reported ASAP
 

·
Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....?
Joined
·
78,895 Posts
You mix this fly bate with some Coke in a pie dish and supposedly the coons and possum won't move 4ft before they're dead.
That's both dangerous and illegal.

But also keep in mind that in many states it's illegal to live trap or kill trap certain animals during certain parts of the year.
That usually doesn't apply in depredation scenarios unless it's a Federally protected raptor or an endangered species.

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/02/regulators-move-limit-wildlife-deaths-misuse-deadly-fly-killer

This past May, a dog named Gunner wandered into his neighbor’s barn and lapped sweet blue liquid from two pie tins on the floor. Then he collapsed and started to convulse. When Gunner’s veterinarian heard the story, he immediately guessed what was in the tins, according to a case summary from the Office of Indiana State Chemist (OISC). It was a mixture of Coca Cola and methomyl, a chemical sold to attract and kill flies.

Gunner eventually recovered, but other animals have been less lucky. Over the past few decades, wildlife researchers and environmental regulators in the United States have become increasingly alarmed by the intentional misuse of methomyl to kill “nuisance” wildlife including skunks and raccoons. Sometimes, however, the victims include dogs, cats, and even bald eagles.

“It’s indiscriminate, intentional poisoning of wildlife,” says Brian Rowe, who recently retired as pesticide section manager at the Michigan Department of Agriculture & Rural Development in Lansing. “Some of them die with their face in the pan that they’re licking out of. I mean, it kills them that quick.”
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
938 Posts
That looks like an awesome recipe. I've never tried raccoon, but my brother-in-law cooks it. I told him I wanted some the next time he cooks one. The author of that article brings up the issue of rabies.... I wouldn't cook an animal that I even suspected of having rabies, but wouldn't getting the temperature of the meat up high enough kill the rabies virus? I haven't seen any on my 60 acres (about 25 miles away from my current home), but I've seen some tracks that I was pretty sure was raccoon, so as soon as I start going over there more regularly, I'm going to take my live trap with me and see what I can come up with. Probably have to sort through all the possums and armadillos because I *know* there are a lot of those over there. :)
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top