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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Im not sure how to go about getting one of my goats into the stanchion to trim her hooves. Shes extremely flightly and I cant get close enough to handle and shes clever enough to not let me corral her. Im thinking about just throwing a lasso over her head but Id rather not reinforce her flightiness if I can avoid it, suggestions?
 

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If your saying she’s very skittish the best option I can give you is patience and sit in the pen with them and if she gets close to you put a rope on her and then after give her a treat after on stand as positive reinforcement and if she’s kicking put feed infront of her and distract her while handling her feet
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The closest ive gotten her to get to me is 10 feet away. And thats with a treat in my hand and all the other goats climbing all over me. If I make any movement at all she sprints away. Even with the laziness theyve been showing lately she wouldnt let me get close to her. Im being very patient with her but Im sure her hooves need attention by now.
 

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The closest ive gotten her to get to me is 10 feet away. And thats with a treat in my hand and all the other goats climbing all over me. If I make any movement at all she sprints away. Even with the laziness theyve been showing lately she wouldnt let me get close to her. Im being very patient with her but Im sure her hooves need attention by now.
Ik it sounds mean but try your best to lasso her but be careful and do not choke her but like I said after lasso give her a treat so that she understands that after rope there’s a treat ok cause if her hooves get to bad she will crawl on her knees cause it will hurt to stand and you don’t want that.
 

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Some goats are simply flighty. She will eventually warm up to you, but in the meantime, if you have a small pen area, feed all of them in the pen. (you mentioned she doesn't let you corral her, so try enticing her to enter the smaller area for food with her friends) Another option is a shepherd's hook/crook. I used one to caught my more flighty goats or sheep. It's easier to use than throwing a rope in my opinion.
 

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Ik it sounds mean but try your best to lasso her but be careful and do not choke her but like I said after lasso give her a treat so that she understands that after rope there’s a treat ok cause if her hooves get to bad she will crawl on her knees cause it will hurt to stand and you don’t want that.
I agree, the hooves need attention now... not when/if this goat ever decides to settle down. Some goats are just morons like that.
 

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I agree, the hooves need attention now... not when/if this goat ever decides to settle down. Some goats are just morons like that.
Agree strongly something you can use sounds real stupid but ik some people use then electric branch cutters lol but it’ll cut em fast so you don’t have to worry to much it goes snip we’ve used them and they are life savers we have over 200 goats and we’re bale to get done is 3 hours if we use those tree cutters on hooves but we don’t let our goats hooves get overgrown we also write down whose hooves grow faster so we stay on top of those more than others
 

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Also never let goat hooves get this bad lots of dairy people that produce goat milk for the world are horrible at taking good care of their goats
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I do not know if this is even logical sounding but I think its because I use my left hand to hold the trimmers. I think I'm trying to do it backwards so it doesnt work for me lol
I have tried 3 different kinds
I’m left handed so it’s always difficult to trim hooves
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for the advice. While we are at it my bucklings hooves arent bad but could use a trim soon but Im at a loss for how to do it without hurting him since his hooves are so small and its mostly quick.
 

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Im not sure how to go about getting one of my goats into the stanchion to trim her hooves. Shes extremely flightly and I cant get close enough to handle and shes clever enough to not let me corral her. Im thinking about just throwing a lasso over her head but Id rather not reinforce her flightiness if I can avoid it, suggestions?
If she is that flighty, just rope her and trim her hooves. The flighty ones tend to be good mothers, so I keep them, but have given up trying to make pets of them.
 

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How long have you had this goat? How attached are you?

12 years of dairying goats have only reinforced our decision to make our farm motto, "Be nice or be food."

If a goat is worth the effort, I'll go the extra mile. Often, that means manhandling the animal. Other times, it means going low-key and taking it step by step. Usually, it's a combination of both, starting out with the manhandling, getting into the goat's space, and letting her know that you are a force with which to be reckoned.

BUT (and I cannot stress this enough) you have to work that animal. You have to put the time in. You have to be consistent, and work with her every. single. day.

It's rare that we encounter an animal that isn't salvageable if you put in the time. It happens, though. That's life.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
How long have you had this goat? How attached are you?

12 years of dairying goats have only reinforced our decision to make our farm motto, "Be nice or be food."

If a goat is worth the effort, I'll go the extra mile. Often, that means manhandling the animal. Other times, it means going low-key and taking it step by step. Usually, it's a combination of both, starting out with the manhandling, getting into the goat's space, and letting her know that you are a force with which to be reckoned.

BUT (and I cannot stress this enough) you have to work that animal. You have to put the time in. You have to be consistent, and work with her every. single. day.

It's rare that we encounter an animal that isn't salvageable if you put in the time. It happens, though. That's life.
I've had her about a month and a half. I'm not exactly attached to her, between her flightiness and not allowing my buckling to eat even when I feed him away from the rest of them.. shes quite a pain. BUT, she is pretty large and has a very solid build to her. So, I'd like to get some more kids out of her before arranging an appointment with the freezer. Honestly, the other does were so easy to get to trust me that I didnt consider just manhandling her until she breaks as being an option.
 

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I've had her about a month and a half. I'm not exactly attached to her, between her flightiness and not allowing my buckling to eat even when I feed him away from the rest of them.. shes quite a pain. BUT, she is pretty large and has a very solid build to her. So, I'd like to get some more kids out of her before arranging an appointment with the freezer. Honestly, the other does were so easy to get to trust me that I didnt consider just manhandling her until she breaks as being an option.
If you think about it, manhandling is not harsh. It's The Goat Way.

Goats butt and bite and ram each other all the time. Heck, just the jostling at the feed trough is like watching Rock-em-Sock-em Robots. Roughhousing is a language they understand.

Showing that you're in charge by force is the same way does keep their young in line. It's how they keep ALL the young in line, for that matter. I've seen my does give a pretty substantial push to other does' kids trying to bum a meal off them.

It takes a lot out of me to have to force a goat on to the stand, but my gals are milkers. If they won't stand to be milked, they don't have the temperament I require of my stock.
 
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