How to Grow Kudzu :)

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by MsPacMan, Oct 5, 2005.

  1. MsPacMan

    MsPacMan Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    273
    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2004
    Location:
    Tennessee
    Found this on the net:

    "Gardening Tips from Down South

    How to Grow Kudzu

    Choosing a Plot: Kudzu can be grown almost anywhere, so site selection is not the problem it is with some other finicky plants like strawberries. Although kudzu will grow quite well on cement, for best result you should select an area having at least some dirt. To avoid possible lawsuits, it is advisable to plant well away from your neighbors house, unless, of course, you don't get along well with your neighbor anyway.

    Preparing the Soil: Go out and stomp on the soil for a while just to get its attention and to prepare it for kudzu.

    Deciding When to Plant: Kudzu should always be planted at night. If kudzu is planted during daylight hours, angry neighbors might see you and begin throwing rocks at you.

    Selecting the Proper Fertilizer: The best fertilizer I have discovered for kudzu is 40 weight non detergent motor oil. Kudzu actually doesn't need anything to help it grow, but the motor oil helps to prevent scraping the underside of the tender leaves when the kudzu starts its rapid growth. It also cuts down on the friction and lessens the danger of fire when the kudzu really starts to move. Change oil once every thousand feet or every two weeks which ever comes first.

    Mulching the Plants: Contrary to what may be told by the Extension Service, kudzu can profit from a good mulch. I have found that a heavy mulch for the young plants produces a hardier crop. For best results, as soon as the young shoots begin to appear, cover kudzu with concrete blocks. Although this causes a temporary setback, your kudzu will accept this mulch as a challenge and will reward you with redoubled determination in the long run.

    Organic or Chemical Gardening: Kudzu is ideal for either the organic gardener or for those who prefer to use chemicals to ward off garden pests. Kudzu is oblivious to both chemicals and pests. Therefore, you can grow organically and let the pests get out of the way of the kudzu as best they can, or you can spray any commercial poison directly on your crop. Your decision depends on how much you enjoy killing bugs. The kudzu will not mind either way.

    Crop Rotation: Many gardeners are understandably concerned that growing the same crop year after year will deplete the soil. If you desire to change from kudzu to some other plant next year, now is the time to begin preparations. Right now, before the growing season has reached its peak, you should list your house and lot with a reputable real estate agent and begin making plans to move elsewhere. Your chances of selling will be better now than they will be later in the year, when it may be difficult for a prospective buyer to realize that underneath those lush green vines stands an adorable three bedroom house.

    by Tifton B Merritt "
     
  2. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    7,154
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    I heard livestock like it. Do you reckon you could put a goat inside a dog pen and plant kudzu around the outside and have plenty of pasture for the goat?
     

  3. Buckrun

    Buckrun Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    184
    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2004
    Location:
    OH.
    I'd be afraid the goat might not be able to get away from the kudzu. Kind of like a vegitarian version of a boa or some other large snake.

    Steve
     
  4. starwalker

    starwalker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    460
    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2005
    Location:
    Tennessee
    I hate the stuff! :flame:
     
  5. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,910
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2003
    Location:
    tn
    i have a love/ hate relationship with it.

    yes, kudzu makes excellent pasture. it's 18% protein!!

     
  6. starwalker

    starwalker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    460
    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2005
    Location:
    Tennessee
    lmao, I know plenty of farms that would let me have as much as I want. I'm just scared the stuff will propagate on my land.

    Isn't there something about it tripping cows, horses. I'm a yankee so you have to excuse my base lack of smarts on it.(Married to a local)

    I just hear the stories at the feed store along with the curses over it broke some cows leg or something to the effect of livestock and legs.
     
  7. georgiaattitude

    georgiaattitude Active Member

    Messages:
    43
    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2005
    This is just too funny. While overseas we never saw the Kudzu but being from the south, I REALLY knew what it was. I used to make up stories and tell my kids about the monsters that lived in the Kudzu that had long green leafy arms. Really had them going for those six years. They were kinda not looking foward to coming back home to the states. Watch out Stephen King, I feel a book coming on.
    Nancy
     
  8. starwalker

    starwalker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    460
    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2005
    Location:
    Tennessee
    I remember when my neices were small, my brother in law called the monster Beau Shank!