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first you have to find a working farm, they are getting few and far apart. most are family farms and don't use outside help any more.

did you want dairy, horse, truck, poultry? ect.
 

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Just howling at the moon
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Anyone that small isn't going to be able to pay you.

You could visit the farmers market to get a list of farms in the area. I wouldn't approach them there but you should be able to give them a visit afterwords.
 

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Is your primary goal to learn small scale farming, or make money? If your goal is to learn, look for internship programs. Many small farms and CSA's farm offer them. They usually include housing, meals and a very small amount of cash. You'll work your butt off, but you'll learn alot. There are some listings on http://www.nofany.org/index.html for interns, and a few PT Jobs. It's a place to start.
 

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Here's another site you might to try. It's the classified section of NewFarm, it's associated with Rodale Institute now.

http://www.rodaleinstitute.org/opport

Also check the menu, right under Classifieds, they have a listing of Farming for Credit, don't know anything about that, sounds like an educational program, just happened to notice it.

Good luck to you.

ETA: There is also a wanted section in the NewFarm classifieds. Maybe you can post a note in that.
 

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From a farmer's view - inexperienced people pay me to teach them, I don't pay them to learn. Before you apply you should have a list of what you're able to do to earn a wage. If you can't come up with a list you might find someone who will let you volunteer while you learn. Be upfront and honest about your skills and what you'd like to learn. There's probably a good match out there for you. Good luck!
 

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I know there are a couple farms in the central NY area that look for people when they are haying, but it is only for a brief period during the summer. You're also quite a ways east of the few people I knew that did that.

I don't think you're too close to SUNY Cobleskill, but you're in that direction. Perhaps they would know of some places looking for help? I had a friend that went to school there and she would occasionally work for different places that needed temporary help. Most of the places she worked at were just repetitive labor though, it wasn't learning why you did something when you did, it was just doing what you were shown to do.

Kayleigh
 

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There is a group called willing workers on organic farms. I have heard this is a really good way to get familiar with the ins and outs of small scale farming.
 

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In my area of NY there are usually ads in the local pennysaver for such types of jobs. Most of the farms advertising though are for dairy farming. Most of them also include housing.....I guess they want you close by. My husband and I both worked for a farm in the past, but it was a horse farm and he trained horses that were being raced and I cleaned stalls. We found that job through the local tack shop. If you look for those type of jobs in papers or online, look in the farm category as well as employment. Or post it somewhere that farmers go.......like your local feed store's bulletin board.

katlupe
 

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There is a guy...Keith Stewart...I think...that wrote a book about organic farming, and talked about the interns he hires.

The book is called "The Long Road to the Tomato."

I actually wrote a review on the book in the garden section of this forum.

Google the name. A guy like that would be a great person to network through.

I would find his number, and call him. He is in New York state.

Clove
 

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There is a group called willing workers on organic farms. I have heard this is a really good way to get familiar with the ins and outs of small scale farming.
Yes, they are known as wwoofers... pretty much a room and board scenario to help out small scale organic farmers while teaching valuable skills.
Here is a link to the international site....
http://www.wwoof.org/
There might be one specifically for the States, I know there is for Canada
 
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