Homesteading Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
430 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am in N.AZ and the predominant soil is silty clay that when driven on turns to powder. The locals say that after it rains if you run over it it will be as hard as cement.

Here is the problem. I have been told that to keep it this way I should spray used motor oil on the top of the road after I have compacted it to prevent moisture from breaking it down again. I don't like that Idea. Not totaly against it just hoping for some other ideas. The amount of road I have to deal with precludes graveling or an industrial aplicator (cost).

Any Ideas??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
940 Posts
Not sure of my spelling, but you can apply it to the roadway and it will keep moisture up to the top.
another way is knifing in anhydrous ammonia it will pack tight as hammered heck.
Around here applying used motor oil to the earth is against the law.. and common sense.
But yes it was an old practice to keep dust down on gravel roads.. as well as killing poison ivy on fences.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,511 Posts
Used motor oil should be recycled not put on roads. Use asphault it is the asme thing but you can't recycle asphault.

Used motor oil will keep the road from becoming dusty and is just as frinedly as asphault mut has a bad image.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
425 Posts
i work for a highway dept and on dirt roads here they use calcium chloride. spred it on with a shovel if its a small piece of road .. if you have a spray tank you can mix it with water and drive over it.........mink
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,333 Posts
I've got lots of clayey soils, and no matter how much gravel I put on em, the road sinks a little each year, and I have to keep applying gravel. SB 2 (smallish crushed gravel with lots of rock flour) does the best job.

Year before last, I had an unlimited supply of cooking oil from the local grocery stores bakery. I was 'wanting' to stockpile it for a biodiesel project. Just about the time I had accumulated enough to try a batch, the source changed delivery methods (sitting out back of the grocery store in 4 gallon buckets) and went to a 100 gallon grease dumpster, and it was hard for me to obtain it, without lots of extry work. So, I had ~100 buckets of nasty grease stacked up. One day, one turned over on the road and went everywhere... Shoot!!! But wait! After the first rain, noticed the road was sealed. The gravel was bound together like an asphalt road. So I started spreading the veggie waste oil on the road. After two years, those 'oiled' sections of road are still perfect, whereas there's been settling and erosion on the non oiled sections.

So, if you have a couple thousand gallons of veggie oil... :rolleyes: you 'could' solve your problem. Motor oil will work too, but it's a little rough on the environment, and against most state laws...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
272 Posts
I was/am looking at Top Seal at www.soilscontrol-usa.com

You might want to have a look at that. I'm looking to seal soil for water retention in a pond without having to pay $72,000,000.00 for a geo fabric liner. It's primarily a soil sealer for road stabilisation but they claim you can make building blocks out of your native soil with this additive - interesting. Allegedly completely safe to handle and environmentally friendly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,192 Posts
What is called "Fly Ash" is also wonderful for stabilization. It is a by-product of coal fired plants. Lime will work also. If you use either the fly ash, lime or any powdered stuff, it will work best if mixed into the soil of the road. Liquids will "mix" themselves. :rolleyes:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,764 Posts
Calcium cloride works - it is a salt that draws water & holds it, will keep the clay bound to the bigger bits fairly well. As salt, it may cause rust in certain situations.

There is an anti-dust made from soybean cake - the poorest quality oil made from soybean crushing plants.

First you need a good roadbed, raised above the regular terrain, and the less clay the better. In your arid part of the world, might be real different than my wet part with deep frosts..... ;)

There is no such thing as 'too long' to gravel 'here' - you either gravel it or you don't have a road. I spent $1000 graveling mine a few years ago. Following year the electric co came in with underground wires & ran a 4' deep chisel down the middle of my driveway.

Following year, another $600 of gravel.....

--->Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,333 Posts
Paul Wheaton said:
I wonder how clay would do with just a crown on the road.

Texican, did your gravel eating road have a crown?
The crowned areas eat less, definitely. I've tried every variation of road making known to humankind... at least the cheap ones :rolleyes: ...as I've pretty much always had more time than money. I've got to where all my ditches are actually ditches, lower than the road, and they all actually drain water away. (lots of shove work, as the phone line got buried inches away from the road, and in places is only inches deep :flame: . I've got a blade for the tractor, and the parts that I actually grade, I try and have a steep crown... usually around ten inches on a twelve foot wide road.

I've found the perfect road system. Blade road to desired crown. Add the road fabric at least in the ruts (only put good gravel where the wheels actually touch... why waste gravel if you're laying it by hand and shovel?) (Got several loads of recycled gravel, mixed with road fabric for free). I put down fist sized rocks... drive over it with a tractor to compact the rocks, after a nice rain, then lay down sb-2, the two inch and smaller sized gravel (local construction yard will sell it by the ton... I can get two tons on my 18'x7' trailer, for 33$) If I have veggie oil, I pour that on it, and voila, no more maintenance.

I've got three baby potholes in a mile of road right now... everytime I drive over em, they get an inch deeper... was telling my SO this evening we were going to have to pay some 'road taxes' (buy a load of gravel and shovel it out :p ) otherwise, within a month, the 1 sq' hole will eat up a whole section of road... and will need several different loads of gravel to fix.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
430 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I have about a half mile of "trouble road". We started getting rain everyday for the last week and I have been diligent to drive over those trouble spots repeatedly. It has gotten very hard but we'll have to see what happens when the weather dries up again. Thanks for all the responses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,694 Posts
Where I live in the White Mtns of AZ, now is the time to put 1" - 2 " red or black volcanic cinders on your crowned road bed due to the rains. They mush into the soft clay as you drive slowly over them and build a good base. After a couple years of doing this, you can lay down smaller cinders or small rock. Small cinders will create dust, rock won't as much. I'd never use salt or oil on my road.

Cinders will spread to the sides of the roadbed, so get someone with a tilt gannon (or a motor grader) to spread then back on the road.

I just shovel more dirt then rake the cinders into my low spots. I do not drive over the bare earth low spots as that seems to just make then deeper. Nor do I drive very fast as that seems to destroy the road faster.

Cinders are about $10.75 yd. 5 yds equals 4 tons (I think). Not too expensive. With a little care, regular maintenance & done right, with your soil (like mine) you'll have a road that lasts.
 

·
Master Of My Domain
Joined
·
7,220 Posts
wow...the cost of stone here is much more expensive.
 

·
Knitting Rocks!
Joined
·
5,783 Posts
texican said:
I've got three baby potholes in a mile of road right now....
Uhhh, Texican, I have the Mama and Papa of those potholes, they want to come see their kids! :rolleyes:
I actually spent ALL DAY with my 2 teen boys shoveling/hauling dirt/rock to the Papa pothole. Yep, 48 - 5 gallon buckets shoveled full, carried to the farm van (read 1998 Windstar) hauled to the hole and dumped in, spread by hand. And, all I can say is --
I HURT!!!! so much for today's workout.
I am hoping that the big down pour of rain we just got didnt wash away all my work. :grump:
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top