How to clean a feathered headress?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Judy in IN, Nov 4, 2004.

  1. Judy in IN

    Judy in IN Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The fellow I'm seeing has an eagle-feather headress that was given to him by a tribe of Indians for services rendered. (He didn't say what the service was) He says he's one of 11 white men to have recieved this honor.

    HOWEVER! This headress has obviously been hanging on the wall in his UTILITY ROOM for a long time! The feathers are dusty/dirty. I would like to borrow this item, clean it, or have it cleaned, and have a case made for it as his Christmas present.

    I'm almost afraid to tackle the job myself--I'm afraid of damaging the feathers.
    Any ideas? Suggestions?
     
  2. bonnie in indiana

    bonnie in indiana Well-Known Member

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    Try going to Google and looking for indian reservations or feather catologs or fur suppliers. There has to be someone who knows. The thought that comes to mind is cornmeal. I wash my SHOW birds in shampoo and water but that might make the headdress fall apart. good luck
     

  3. Explorer

    Explorer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    For hundreds of years, Native Americans have used eagle feathers for religious and cultural purposes, including healing, marriage, and naming ceremonies. As a result of years of habitat loss from urbanization, exposure to chemicals used in agriculture and animal husbandry, and poaching, the populations of eagles declined by an alarming rate. In order to protect these birds, the United States Congress passed the Bald Eagle Protection Act in 1940. The Act was amended in 1962 to include protection for golden eagles. The Bald Eagle Protection Act prohibits the take, transport, sale, barter, trade, import and export, and possession of eagles, making it illegal for anyone to collect eagles and eagle parts without a permit.

    Feathers or parts of bald or golden eagles and other migratory birds may NOT be sold, purchased, bartered or traded. They may, however, be handed down to family members from generation to generation, or from one Native American to another for religious purposes. Native Americans may NOT give eagle feathers or parts to non-Native Americans as a gift.
     
  4. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    My aunt, who has lots of taxidermy stuff in her house was instructed to dust feathers with a piece of bread. If it takes more than that, I would consult a taxidermist about how to clean it, but keep to yourself the nature of the species involved.

    Jena
     
  5. katmease

    katmease Member

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    On the turkey mounts we have, a feather duster always does well as it doesn't cause the feathers to separate.
     
  6. Judy in IN

    Judy in IN Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks, I will try the feather duster and bread. I also am going to call a restoration company in the morning.

    I don't know about the relative thing with the Indians....maybe they made him a blood brother? :D All I know is that he has a letter allowing him to own that headdress, and that it's been on the wall for 15 YEARS! When I mentioned cleaning it, he hesitated, and said,"You know those are Eagle feathers." I think I may consult or hire a professional for this.

    The things this guy has, and doesn't take care of..... :eek: