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Be powerful. No other option exists.
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Jerry, I apologize for "talking about you."

I guess what I think is that we don't know a specific level of autism, what her history is, how helpful the staff there is (or not), what her official decision maker (her father?) wants, etc., etc.

Telling her to do this or that may not be helpful (or have an impact) without knowing a LOT more than we do know.

Actually, I just caught myself on that. I help a neighbor and his family. They are the epitome of non-compliant. Telling them what would be a good decision only works if they are interested in the decision in the first place. Sigh. With some folks, all the energy we spend, wanting to help may be absolutely no use at all.

Jerry, how BAD is your mobility issue? Are you in a wheel chair? What can be done to improve your mobility?
 

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What hand-woven items do people want most? It must be fun but practical. No decorations allowed!
Why not perfect the skills you have and it may allow you at least enough money to replenish your supplies.

I knit socks and beanies for charity but purchase a certain amount of inexpensive cotton yarn to make dish cloths to sell.

With my leftover sock yarn, I knit boot cuffs that are quick and easy. I just raised prices to $25/pair and still have more demand than I can handle.
 

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I've also said before that Jerry is more clever than most here may believe.
Who here has said they think she’s not clever? I haven’t seen anyone suggest that.

Since we’re now given to tirades to psychoanalyze others, by your example, I take that sentence in your screed to be projection. You’re the one that has decided she’s not clever, and you’re using that to justify your attempt to bully her “for her own good”.
 

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Be powerful. No other option exists.
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I think that Jerry is likely doing the best she can on a moment to moment basis. She has fallen under the "sky is falling" spell and wants to be part of the solution. We have no idea if her abilities, finances, family, etc., will support her goals.

Sometimes, Jerry, you drive me slightly bonkers, but I get over it. :)
 

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You know, weaving your own bedding and other post-shtf items.
Why does in need to be post shtf items? Why is not just items that people need now?
You're overly focused on something you believe is going to happen a certain way in the future and it would be better to focus on your current situation.
What’s the problem with using “still valuable post-SHTF” as a qualifier in the search for what to do?

If Jerry is trying to decide what skill set to focus on and develop, and starting from a blank slate, the sheer breadth of options can be debilitating. A couple qualifiers like that can help narrow down the scope and turn the decision into something more approachable and solvable.

I don’t get the implication that focusing on something that would be valuable in a post-SHTF situation won’t be useful if that scenario never comes to pass. Nearly everyone on here has made lifestyle choices and practices skills that are in a tiny minority today. That our lifestyle and skill-practice choices happen to coincide with security in a post-SHTF scenario may or may not be coincidental, but they’re obviously also valuable and useful to us today, “pre-SHTF”.

I’m hearing Jerry say that she would gain peace of mind in developing skills that will help her in harder times. That is an interest, and it’s a worthwhile one. Why discourage it?
 

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@Jerryberry , this is my recommendation.

List out the limitations you have; limited mobility, poor math skills, poor social skills, wherever they may be. Be honest with yourself, and know that you don’t ever have to share that list with anyone.

Then, spend some time (plenty of time) looking at videos reading about and/or visiting communities that strive for self-sufficiency; communes, primitive communities, those sort of places. Pay attention to all the jobs that get done and things that get made there, listing every one that sparks even a little interest in you.

Then, once you’ve spent a good bit of time on it, and have solid entries for both lists, compare the jobs-list against the limitations-list, and see which jobs could work for you.

Then, if you have more than one remaining (which hopefully you will), start rating those jobs/goods by which ones could be useful today, meaning if the S never HTF. If you still have more than one, that’s a great problem to have, and you can start investigating each a little further to help you choose.


It’s sounding like you started with “find self-sufficiency”, and the investigation into self-sufficiency always seems to start with food production, gardening and that sort of thing. It starts there because that’s the most common basis for self-sufficiency. But, when you start looking at self-sufficient communities (or even just better-prepared ones), not everyone is the gardener or baker. The community’s medical care provider probably doesn’t spend a lot of time in the garden or kitchen. The gardeners are always going to need a supply of baskets and having their baskets repaired, so someone is doing that.

If you take an organized and thorough approach, which you obviously can, you’ll find plenty of options of worthwhile things for you to get good at that will also be valuable to you regardless whether the world is a stable place or not.
 

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This is a really interesting thread. I'd have to take the side of the those who believe in building communities of people with similar goals. Rugged individualism is great, but there should be a system in place for people to come together. Human history is full of the corpses of those who thought they'd planned for everything. Also, history is filled with wars won by the strongest group of people, and in a lot of cases they only waged war because their crops failed and their neighbors were too weak and disorganized to fight effectively.

Come to think of it, that was the whole point of having a United States from sea to shining sea in the first place. Manifest Destiny. We're supposed to be a huge country with more resources than needed, so we can aid our fellow citizens after a hurricane or feed each other during droughts or floods.
 

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What hand-woven items do people want most? It must be fun but practical. No decorations allowed!
As a tall person who loves to wrap up in a throw blanket when in my recliner, I rarely find blankets long enough to cover my feet and reach my chin. Maybe that is something you could market.
 

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Posted 9/22/22 9:07 PM CDST

How can a community prepare accordingly?
Here on the mountain in between the large scale farms and two cattle ranches we have a lot of 40 acre parcel home farmers and smaller tract kitchen garden growers and small flock egg producers. a few horse loggers like life was 90 years ago.

The last couple years , more folks are taking lessons from the small scale folks as most of the smaller operation folks are either retired or split their days between their small farming and current era work and investing to have some modern cash flow to pay bills as they eliminate the majority of their food expenses and add to their savings taking extra produce to local grower markets on the weekends.

My neighbor's and I all feel that we have enough savings to pay our property taxes for a number of years if the economy gets real bad as we grow and barter what we eat and use our wood stoves.

As long as property taxes exist , the only folks truly living off grid will be only the tripwire vets and not quite right country boys who slip off into state and federal forests to forage and live like a Rambo.

In the 1930s depression my grand father and great uncles took turns working "city jobs" as the others worked their 40 acre farms with the wives and kids to make sure they had farm goods for food and sale and the city job money as two streams of income to pay bills and keep the kids in shoes and clothes for chuch and school.

Many folks get mesmerized by the Little House on The Prarie books and TV show as primitive lifestyles , yet they choose to overlook how the Ingalls also worked within the Grid of the era as a secondary cash flow by doing city work carpentry, teamster wagon hauling. seamstress garmet making , lumber and brick production and other work for the sectors that didn't farm.
 
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