How small can a homestead go?- Take a lookie at this cute little farm!

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Xandras_Zoo, Apr 19, 2005.

  1. Xandras_Zoo

    Xandras_Zoo Well-Known Member

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  2. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    I want some of those micro pigs, no bigger than a cocker spaniel. Nice site, thanks for the link.
     

  3. momlaffsalot

    momlaffsalot Well-Known Member

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    Very interesting read. I love when people follow their dreams.
     
  4. snoozy

    snoozy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    the English farmette reminds me a lot of that BBC program "Good Neighbours". The Spanish place is quite a different set-up!...
     
  5. iowahopefuls

    iowahopefuls Well-Known Member

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    Howdy,

    Since I know pretty much nothing about pigs I was wondering if the "micro pig" they had is the same as a pot-belly pig?? Can you eat pot-belly pigs?
    My family will be moving to Missouri shortly and I am trying to gather info. on different types of animals and what breeds are best and easiest to raise.
    Thank you,
    Danielle
     
  6. Xandras_Zoo

    Xandras_Zoo Well-Known Member

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    I think potbellies are a whole lot bigger then 40 pounds. And apparently they are very fatty. Check out Kunekunes (pronouced Cooney Coonies)!!! They sound like marvelous little pigs- http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Valley/5330/kunekunekune.html - that's the best website I've found on them. Quite cute too. Grow 2' tall and 31" long, weigh about 260lbs. This is what I found under the "Care" section

    "Kune kunes have an excellent ratio of meat to fat. The nicest pork is that of a pig killed before it is one year old - eight to ten month old animals have an excellent meat to fat ratio. After eight months fat builds up, but can be easily removed from the carcass. Kune kunes are considered by many to be nicer eating than the faster grown commercial pig!"

    Edited to note that this should probably be moved to the piggy forum.
     
  7. leaping leon

    leaping leon Well-Known Member

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    I've spent some time online checking out "micro-livestock" since we only have a little over four acres, mostly in trees (I want the firewood and I want to keep as many trees as I can...)

    I plan to raise potbellies and slaughter them early enough to keep them from getting too fat...but I also plan to let some of them "go to fat" because I want the lard for a number of purposes: cooking, soap maybe, and for some of my weird experiments (fuel maybe?) In an extreme food shortage, fat is precious...the two nutrients hardest to find in a survival situation are fat and vitamin C during the winter.

    We also plan to raise ducks, mini-goats, and rabbits for eggs, milk and meat, when we are settled in on our new farmette. I hope we can get a milk cow some day, but I'll have to figure out how to pasture her, it will require a little work and thought...

    I love the concept of micro-farming...I started falling in love with it when I first encountered "The Square Foot Garden" concept...

    I believe that with God's blessing, a person can grow a lot of food on very little land if they do research and spend time planning...and go with what works...and do the work...

    I'm kinda lazy, or I'm real caught up in efficiency, but I'd rather spend hours and hours planning and have something that might require more labor and money to get started, and little labor to keep going. This concept also seems to apply to micro-farms.

    I enjoy reading how the English do this stuff. They're way ahead of us on some things.

    Thanks for the links...and yes the pigs are almost certainly pot bellies...one photo shows a "belly" on one of the pigs...but they don't have the short snouts like I've seen on most of our US potbellies.