How, oh how do you choose?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by marisal, Mar 1, 2005.

  1. marisal

    marisal Well-Known Member

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    I just went through all my seeds that I intended on planting this year, and oh my, I have over 70 different types!! :eek:

    I don't even have a garden yet, I am putting one in this spring. I will be getting truck loads of dirt, compost, and manure to put in my soon to be constructed raised beds.

    The worst part is, I took out all the ones that I would have to start indoors, like tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, ect....

    As I was collecting all these seeds, I only got the ones that sounded really good..or really interesting. But can be direct seeded... But it added up to a lot!

    There are some things that I have to plant all varieties, mainly the garlic....

    But other ones I guess I can cut down...sorta. I was thinking maybe plant the older ones first.....but I bought new ones cause I really wanted them!

    Oh bother.

    How do you pick what kind to plant?

    Help!!

    ~Marisa :)
     
  2. tallpines

    tallpines Well-Known Member

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    I think you've got a full blown case of SPRING FEVER.
     

  3. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    Only 70 varieties? :haha:

    Garlic should be in the ground by now, if not fall planted you can expect some that finish into a bulb usually, rather than cloves. Don't forget to pinch off the seed pod at the top and eat those fresh before they go to seed! yum.

    I would test germinate any seeds that are in open packages and older. If you get a decent rate of something like 50%, then plant those up first. Certain seeds, like bean seeds are fertile for more years than other seeds.

    It's always fun to get variety. Prioritize those vegetables you really can't live without and give enough volume to get decent harvest of those. If you have more than one variety of a class of vegetables, then that is where you can cut down on how much of the garden you have room left to plant. Remember also the squash and plants that take up a lot of room. Check the seed packs if you have bush varieties that can save space, and stuff like that.
     
  4. Ed K

    Ed K Well-Known Member

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    My routine is to fill out the order form for all the catalogs. Then I add it all up and start to sweat at how much it all costs. I then proceed through a successive series of thinning down the list until I can afford it. If I get stuck on the process I can either focus on the items I really eat now (as opposed to the ones that sound so good that I might change my diet to fit) Another way to focus quickly is to ask my wife to look at the list. She's usually capable of thinning the list down very quickly since she wasn't involved in reading all the glowing descriptions that lead to the list being that big and since she's more in touch with the terrible realities of our household budget . (It's faster and more realistic if she helps but somewhat less fun)

    As a side note I think the I only only ever read one "advertisement" that sounded realistic. It was a few years ago in the Seed Savers Exchange catalog. Someone wrote that a particular african squash variety was bland and not very produtive. I often wondered how many seed requests they got?
     
  5. Pat

    Pat Well-Known Member

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    Don't forget you can succession plant too. The areas those things you plant first and don't like the heat or are ready to harvest in 3 months (like peas, potatoes, onions, cabbage, beets, carrots etc.) can be replanted with beans, egg plant, okra etc. That way you can plant most of your varities. You also might want to plant part of a package of seed (if you are just putting in a garden ((implies first one there)) some things won't do as well as you hope ((or the package says)) so I'd try a little of most things, determine what does grow well, and you can plant more of it next year).

    Pat
     
  6. kentuckyhippie

    kentuckyhippie Well-Known Member Supporter

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    glad I'm not the only one who does that LOL I usually get the garden full then start with five gallon buckets set all over the yard LOL not to mention onions in the flower beds
     
  7. Kazahleenah

    Kazahleenah Disgruntled citizen

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    Pick? I was sposed to..... "pick"???? maybe THAT'S why my garden ended up almost 3 acres!!! lol
    Best of luck deciding!!!
    Kaza
     
  8. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    Im with kaza ,pick ,what ya mean i can't plow up the back field!?!?!?Just tear up all the grass you have to spend time mowing and mulch heavy!! Then watch the food role in ! With ten people here and large gardens we still have lots for the chickens!
     
  9. marisal

    marisal Well-Known Member

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    lol!!

    I actually will be planting it all soon. I want to start a CSA someday. The problem is we have 26 acres of woods. No clearings, so I have to take down a lot of trees. I dont think I can do 2 acres in one season. I wish I could! I am trying to get a group of family together for some pizza, beer, and firewood if they bring their chainsaws. We'll see....

    At least I know I'm not the only one!!

    ~Marisa :)
     
  10. HilltopDaisy

    HilltopDaisy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think how you pick depends on a number of things. My job requires a lot of OT in the summer, so I need to plant things that store easily, with minimal processing. Things like beets, winter squash, potatoes and greens will be the backbone of the garden. I really want to plant just what I plan to eat--nothing "frilly", know what I mean? I will admit, my seed orders were out of control this year!! Between Baker Creek Heirlooms and Pine Tree, I went a little overboard.

    This will be the third year for my garden area so I expect it do do quite well. I'm adding 7 more raised beds (4'x8'), 2 more Gala apple trees, and 4 more blueberry bushes, maybe strawberries, we'll see. My goal is to grow for the farmers market in a year or two. I'm sick of mowing grass in the side yard, so I'm going to till it and plant corn there. Now I have to pick a short season corn seed! The decisions never end, but it's so much fun! I don't envy you turning woods into a garden, that will be hard work.
     
  11. birdie_poo

    birdie_poo Well-Known Member

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    Either that, or you are just like me, and collect things...I have so many packets of seed, I would need acres to plant them all. I think I get them because I am an OCD collector...just like the fabric for quilting.
     
  12. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Have you grown any of the varieties before? If I have grown one out then I know whether I want to plant it again. For example, one variety of yellow squash I planted several yrs ago seemed to attract squash bugs. The zukes next to it were untouched. So next time I plant yellow squash I will not use that variety. Toss the seed. Some of the tomato varieties I've planted were disappointing, so I won't use those, I'll try another. I found I do not like green tomatillos, but love the pineapple flavored ones. Kentucky wonder beans leave me cold, so I'm trying some different varieties this year.

    If I have more varieties than room,(which I usually do) I will only plant a few of each to see if I like them and they do well. Save seed from the keepers. Just because a pkg will plant a 100 ft row, does not mean you need a l00 ft row! If you start too many indoors you can usually give the extras away or sell them.

    Now my biggest problem is where to plant all the medicinal herb seeds that I have collected! LOL
     
  13. Sharon in NY

    Sharon in NY Well-Known Member

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    Only 70 packets? We have a little problem - last year we doubled our CSA size, and I, umm, ordered enough seed to feed Albania. And I thought, "this year I'll hardly need anything." Well, guess what. Those little packages with seeds keep showing up!

    It only gets worse from here :haha: .

    Sharon
     
  14. sylvar

    sylvar Well-Known Member

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    Pineapple flavored!?! Do tell! I have only seen the green and the black. I grew the green last year for the first time. Man, I had no idea they got that BIG. I had WAY more than I needed...one can only make so much green salsa.

    Moonwolf is right about the garlic. It needs to be planted in the fall, but the next best thing is to plant it now before it warms up. I have done this from time to time...and this year was one of those times. You still get a decent crop...just not as big as if you planted in the fall. What I do is build a bed out of potting soil right on the frozen ground then plant the garlic and water it in. That way as soon as it warms up it starts growing. You don't have to wait for the ground to dry out.

    Sylvar