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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It somehow just struck me today that unless you cut up lot raw produce or meat, most people buy food in such a way that only cutting necessary is to open the plastic container.

I am relatively lazy and only do two meals per day, but this involves lot chopping on cutting board twice a day. So seems odd not to need a knife.

Now people on homesteading forum would tend to use a knife more than most, but kinda curious.
 
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It somehow just struck me today that unless you cut up lot raw produce or meat, most people buy food in such a way that only cutting necessary is to open the plastic container.

I am relatively lazy and only do two meals per day, but this involves lot chopping on cutting board twice a day. So seems odd not to need a knife.

Now people on homesteading forum would tend to use a knife more than most, but kinda curious.
Have you been on vacation. Not seen you for awhile. I keep very sharp knifes. I do my own butchering and do need sharp knifes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Have you been on vacation. Not seen you for awhile. I keep very sharp knifes. I do my own butchering and do need sharp knifes.
Covid vacation.... No I didnt get covid, but my friend and I both older with health issues where covid would be deadly so big delay in moving... Then we got the handyman from hell at the new place. He started slow walking all projects. Had to fire him, we are not sure if he is closet drunk or what, he has the knowledge, but apparently finishing a job for significantly more money not great incentive for him. Just take whatever small up front money he can grab and dont do diddly beyond mow the lawn and couple other small things. And neighbors down there decided place was abandoned and started carting everything of any value off. Joy after joy. Cant move anything until we have somebody living there full time or it just gets picked over and hauled off. Hoping to get my friends sister moved in as care taker on big house. Her son in law supposed to come and try to get water leaks fixed (thought that idiot handyman had that done, but apparently not).

Like said my observation on knives really doesnt apply that much to homesteader types. It was more thinking typical American. I mean they even sell things like shredded cheese and pre-chopped veggies. And such things as food processor. So yea other than a small knife (or scissors) to open plastic packages, can see people not needing a serious knife.
 
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Doesn't anybody peel potatoes anymore? I've been trying to beat the Amazon rush this year, especially, so I bought a pack of Victorinox paring knives....pretty nice, colored handles to let you know where they are in the drawer. Been thinking all the females will get a set for Christmas, even though some of them will stay sharp forever since they will only be used for cutting plastic film.

My niece went to culinary school. One Thanksgiving she let me carve the turkey with her $$$$ knife---what a joy. Made me an instant expert carver. Quality sometimes pays off.

(John, good to see you back.)

geo
 

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I use knives in the kitchen every day - I have a quick hand held sharpener that I use pretty often.

Here's a story to kind of illustrate what you might be thinking about. Pre-Covid, I would help at our church every other month with the food pantry distribution - people come, pick up their food. They are pre-registered so they often sit in the church waiting to be called. We serve bagels etc. I got tired of having to slice bagels with the church's knives, so I brought mine and warned folks they were sharp. 3 other ladies were helping me - everyone one of them cut themselves. Apparently they had no idea how to handle a sharp knife. :rolleyes: I finally banned everyone from helping me and I did the cutting by myself at all following events.
 

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I have numerous kitchen knives(30+) so by rotating I have sharp knives constantly . When I am in the mood I will sharpen a batch . I like all my edged tools very sharp , makes no sense to me to struggle with anything dull . I enjoy working with knives,axes, etc. and do not want to take the fun out of it fighting a dull edge .
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I use a paring knife several times a week. It's not real sharp, I need to spend some time sharpening my paring knives.
It makes a difference on any knife to be truly sharp. Much more pleasant.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I use knives in the kitchen every day - I have a quick hand held sharpener that I use pretty often.

Here's a story to kind of illustrate what you might be thinking about. Pre-Covid, I would help at our church every other month with the food pantry distribution - people come, pick up their food. They are pre-registered so they often sit in the church waiting to be called. We serve bagels etc. I got tired of having to slice bagels with the church's knives, so I brought mine and warned folks they were sharp. 3 other ladies were helping me - everyone one of them cut themselves. Apparently they had no idea how to handle a sharp knife. :rolleyes: I finally banned everyone from helping me and I did the cutting by myself at all following events.
LOL, yea, if not used to using sharp knife, may find part of a finger and some unexpected special sauce in whatever you are chopping. Dull knives maybe more apt to slip and cut you, but a sharp knife can do far more damage in a careless moment.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Doesn't anybody peel potatoes anymore? I've been trying to beat the Amazon rush this year, especially, so I bought a pack of Victorinox paring knives....pretty nice, colored handles to let you know where they are in the drawer. Been thinking all the females will get a set for Christmas, even though some of them will stay sharp forever since they will only be used for cutting plastic film.

My niece went to culinary school. One Thanksgiving she let me carve the turkey with her $$$$ knife---what a joy. Made me an instant expert carver. Quality sometimes pays off.

(John, good to see you back.)

geo
Sometime back bought one of those plastic handle Victorinox paring knives after everybody was hyping them so much. Its sharp but I really didnt like feel of the handle and blade little too flexy. I replaced the plastic handle with one from piece dead oak branch epoxied on and sanded to shape I found comfortable. It improved feel a lot but stil dont often use it. The blade just not right shape somehow. I really prefer clip point or sheepsfoot style. Not the dagger point style.

I recently got curious testing how knife blade geometry affects cutting. I pulled an old serrated Farberware paring knife out of my $1 box of knives. Dull saw of a knife. Time waster to mess with such. I ground off the serrations. Then carefully (not to over heat metal) gave it a full flat grind (flat bevel spine to edge on both sides). Well best I could, angle grinder not the best choice for this, but fastest. Then sharpened it. Junk steel, but that thing cuts amazing and I have some good paring knives, it matched them in cutting ability. Geometry/profile truly very important. No idea how long it will feel sharp, it is pretty cheapo crappo steel I think as are most serrated knives.

Oh just interesting video proving any sharp knife beats any dull knife...... LOL

 

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I have loads of Old Hickory knives I bought at old hardware stores, but the majority came from estate and garage sales. The high carbon isn't as pretty and shiny as the stainless steel so the people would put them out to sale. Thrift stores are a good source of cheap good quality knives as well. I have one large butcher knife that I keep separately from anything else. If I put my hand anywhere near the edge of that one I can cut myself.

Ex would dull the edges of the knives in a rapid fashion, I would occasionally pick one up and find it dull, check out the rest in the drawer and end up sharpening all of them. I would tell her but she would invariably cut herself repeatedly for the next week or two.
I have some dull knives that I can't keep sharp or have trouble sharpening. Mostly stainless. High carbon is easy to sharpen and maintain an edge.
 

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several times a day and i sharpen my own. same way with my axes and whatnot. i also carry a pocketknife in all my handbags. wouldn't be able to get on a plane with that now but i dont travel. ~Georgia
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I have loads of Old Hickory knives I bought at old hardware stores, but the majority came from estate and garage sales. The high carbon isn't as pretty and shiny as the stainless steel so the people would put them out to sale. Thrift stores are a good source of cheap good quality knives as well. I have one large butcher knife that I keep separately from anything else. If I put my hand anywhere near the edge of that one I can cut myself.

Ex would dull the edges of the knives in a rapid fashion, I would occasionally pick one up and find it dull, check out the rest in the drawer and end up sharpening all of them. I would tell her but she would invariably cut herself repeatedly for the next week or two.
I have some dull knives that I can't keep sharp or have trouble sharpening. Mostly stainless. High carbon is easy to sharpen and maintain an edge.
The downside to Old Hickory, the blade as comes from factory needs to be thinned a bit. And their chef knife doesnt leave lot knuckle room on cutting board. There is guy that sells scythes online that also sells Old Hickory chef knife and gives $5 option that he will thin the blade and sharpen it for you. Old Hickory Chef's Knife Without the option its same price as Amazon. $5 well spent IMHO if you want one of these. Fit and finish on standard run Old Hickory as they come from factory not the greatest. You might get lucky, you might not.


Now I ran across an even cheaper 1095 carbon steel knife, only found it on ebay and its shipped from UK though guessing its Chinese, no way to find out for sure where its made. Called Alistar. They sell lot of that "damascus" look decorative knives but this is plain jane and good knife cheap. And only by auction though shouldnt having problem winning auction with minimum bid. They post many many auctions.

Its nice steel and a heavy knife. Worked ok as chopping knife after I touched up edge, but probably needs some modification thinning blade a bit, for optimum quality. Like Old Hickory, its the old kind of carbon steel and it easily rusts. Probably want to force a patina and then oil it if not using it regularly. No dishwasher, no leaving it in water.

 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Mom had a paring knife whose blade was so curved that it fit apples and potatoes and other round fruit perfectly. Was just right for cutting up peaches. For years she sharpened it on the top edge of the cookie crock.

geo
I have one of those I got in box junk. Called hawkbill or something like that. They are nice knife to peel with. One I have and not sure where its at, was a cheapie German made one, stamped blade with plastic handle. But peel an apple or whatever like nobody's business. Not much use other than peeling round stuff.
 
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