how much to plant for the year,guide needed

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by lorian, Dec 6, 2006.

  1. lorian

    lorian Well-Known Member

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    Where can I find detailed info. on how much to plant (and when to plant it)
    to feed a family of 6 for a year? I never seem to get it right. I need HELP knowing amounts to produce to be self sufficient. I seem to get closer to the goal every year but don't have it down yet.

    Any book or web site suggestions?
    Thanks!
     
  2. Marcia in MT

    Marcia in MT Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've seen this information in a publication from Montana State U. Extension service. They have all sorts of stuff to read/print out/get from their office. I don't have a link but they're easy to find on the web.
     

  3. anniew

    anniew keep it simple and honest Supporter

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    YOu can use guides, but the really important part of planning is knowing what your family likes and how many times a week you'd use something. Then do the math.
    Using something like the chart at the beginning of the JOhnnys Seed catalog, which tells you how much you can expect to harvest from a 100 foot row, you can determine how much you need to plant to get the harvest you need based on your earlier calculations.
    No one knows your families likes and dislikes better than you, so use that to figure.
    It also never hurts to put up 2 years worth of some things, so that if a poor year occurs, you still have a stash of canned green beans, or whatever.
    Ann
     
  4. InHisName

    InHisName Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Try the book by John Jeavons How to Grow More Vegetables in Less Space Than You Thought Possible - yikes, did I get that title right? Anyway, he had a great table with that info in his book- check it out!
     
  5. kitaye

    kitaye Well-Known Member

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    Storey's Basic Country Skills gives a chart with the most common vegetable plants for a year. I've listed the most common around here. Others are listed so let me know if I missed one you need.

    excerpt:
    Dry Beans 30 Feet Row per person
    Shell Beans 30 feet row per person
    Snap Beans 30 feet row per person
    Broccoli 5 plants per person
    Onions 20 sets per person
    Cabbage 10 plants per person
    Corn 25 feet row per person
    Beets 15 feet row per person
    Tomatoes 5 plants per person
    Potatoes 50 feet row per person
     
  6. lorian

    lorian Well-Known Member

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    kityae- thats exactly the type of info. I need. Where can I get more lists like this?
    It would be great if there was a site with all kinds of garden charts on it, would be so helpful.

    I'll check out the above refs. as well - thanks
     
  7. kitaye

    kitaye Well-Known Member

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    I've only seen it in the book I mentioned. I suspect any good gardening guide will give you something similar.
     
  8. menollyrj

    menollyrj Joy Supporter

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    I second the Jeavons book as recommended reading. It has the information you are looking for as well as a whole host of other excellent info on various garden topics.

    -Joy
     
  9. suitcase_sally

    suitcase_sally Well-Known Member Supporter

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    What is the difference between "dry beans" and "shell beans"?
     
  10. LMonty

    LMonty Well-Known Member

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    Dry beans are just that- the dried seed. Like the Black or pinto or navy beans you can buy bulk or more commonly in 1 lb bags in the grocery store. Used mostly for baked beans, and meals such as beans with rice, after rehydrated and cooked.

    Shell beans, sometimes called shellies; are the type you eat when the seed is more mature than the green bean stage but still soft. Lima beans like the ones used in succotash are the ones most people are familiar with. Lots of beans can be harvested that way,(the pd is still green, notdried, but when the beans swell in the pod, and the pod has gotten too fibrous to be tasty anymore is the good time to harvest shellies IME -just boil them up! add a little bacon and diced onion if you like...Yummm! ) and used as shellies.

    Some types of "green" beans are very useful, especially for gardeners; in that they are good in all three stages- green pod, shellie, and dried. Three different crops from each plant :)
     
  11. Charleen

    Charleen www.HarperHillFarm.com Supporter

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  12. deberosa

    deberosa SW Virginia Gourd Farmer!

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    Yes you got the title right and it's the source I was going to suggest. It has many reference tables for timing, soil types, plant compatibility, intercropping. Everything to support a 4 person family down to the exact number of seeds needed!