How much milk does a goat give per day?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by airotciv, Jun 5, 2005.

  1. airotciv

    airotciv Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I know I depends on the Breed of goat, but I have a few friends that would like to buy goat milk from me. It would only be a few gallons a week I'm guessing. Not sure it is worth doing. I could learn to make cheese with the rest. I guess. They would buy that too. Is it worth it? And if so what goat should I get. Thanks
     
  2. lizmont2000

    lizmont2000 Active Member

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    We have Nubians, and are currently only milking 1 first freshener (her production should increase over a few freshenings).
    We get 6-7 cups a milking. We have friends that milk theirs 3x a day. Too much milk and too much time commitment for us, but it works for them!

    Alpines and Togs are reputed to give alot of milk also.
    hth,
    Liz
     

  3. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    Young milkers here milk from 4 to 7 pounds, this would be average, and they milk this amount for 10 months (they milk more the first 8 weeks, and less the last 4 weeks since they are bred, so this is an average). These are Nubians. My friends Alpines milk twice what my Nubians do, they also make more cheese per pound of milk than Nubians do because they have lower butterfat and higher protein. It's at least 4 ounce more cheese per gallon of milk, it was pretty amazing to me really! Our goats are on the same diet also.

    The big number for you is what can you sell that gallon of milk for or that pound of milk, and what is it going to cost you to produce it. Purchasing the goat, housing, fencing, feeding, water, electricity, containers, equipment, etc. Just in the basics here, since most goats are born here and not purchased, we are over $1 in costs for each gallon of milk, on the books it's $2 per gallon with paying me a salary of $10 per hour. So if you can get $6 to $12 per gallon for the milk, or 50 cents to a dollar per ounce of cheese, and your family will drink the milk and utilize the other products, than yes it is worth it. Add the sales of breeding stock, selling manure for folks gardens, perhaps soap or lotion, colostrum sales, it's a nice little profit for a SAHM. Vicki (Stay at Home Grandma :) Well lets be honest, I am only home during chores, I show goats :)
     
  4. airotciv

    airotciv Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks for the info., gives my alot to think about. So much I hadn't even thought about. so thanks again.
     
  5. Oceanrose

    Oceanrose Driftin' Away

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    Wow, those statements on alpine vs nubians are amazing. May have to switch to alpines on my wish list as opposed to nubians...


    Heather

    My friends Alpines milk twice what my Nubians do, they also make more cheese per pound of milk than Nubians do because they have lower butterfat and higher protein. It's at least 4 ounce more cheese per gallon of milk, it was pretty amazing to me really! Our goats are on the same diet also.
     
  6. Kasidy

    Kasidy Well-Known Member

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    Also, be very sure you live in a state where sale of raw milk for human consumption is legal----if not, be sure your friends are discreet!!!
     
  7. airotciv

    airotciv Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks didn't think of that either. I quess that is the first thing I should find out.
     
  8. Vere My Sone

    Vere My Sone Well-Known Member

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    Yep, my state only allows raw milk to be sold on farm for nonhuman purposes
     
  9. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    You can check into selling shares on the goats, however. Read up at realmilk.com for info.
     
  10. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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    I am presently milking two Lamanchas once a day and get 1 1/2 gallons a day. The kids are about 10 weeks old and stay with the does during the day. This is so I only have to milk once a day. I separate the does from their kids at night and milk in the morning with their udders very full and tight. If I milk twice a day, even with the kids still on during the day, I get more milk, about two gallons a day. I am planning to wean soon, but I will be trading convience for more milk. I have a daughter fixin to have a baby and don't want to tie myself up more than I have to right now by doubling my milking schedule at this time. However, after the human kid comes, I will wean the two sets of twins from the milking does and start twice a day milking. The does are 3 and 4 years old and are on lactation pellets 17% and alfalfa pellets 17% (protein). They also get browse and a bit of coastal hay. I don't over feed to keep my cost down. If I pampered my goats, I would get more milk. I trade much of my milk for feed, keep my freezer full, and feed lots to the dogs and chickens. We use a great deal of it making sugar-free jello instand pudding. Some days I pretty much have nothing but goat milk and maybe a banana or apple. It's a mainstay of our diet. Raw, of course (for us). Also, in Texas it is illegal to sell goat milk unless you have an approved dairy....Diane
     
  11. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    If your state doesn't allow milk sales, there's the goat-share option. Here's a link: http://www.sonshinefarmers.com/goatshare.htm . Also, she said alpines give higher protein (more cheese), but lower butterfat. I personally like a LOT of butterfat in my milk and my fresh chevre. Had the low butterfat stuff, and it just isn't as sweet and rich. But that's a personal thing. I just wanted you to be aware of the tradeoff.
     
  12. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    I sell for pet consumption. My customers off realmilk.com and who are referred to me in other ways all know the rules. They know that it's up to them if they want to drink the milk that I sold to them for their dog :) I don't use the cowshare idea because two gals were popped when using this rule in New Mexico. If the law is that you can't sell milk for human consumption, no matter how you slice it, even cow shares are illegal if they want to make a point of it. So the pet consumption label is the way to go, unless your state legislates that also. Always look into the rules yourself, don't ever take anyones word for what it says, because there are those on other lists who tell you that Texas legislates petmilk, when it is not a law it is a guideline, an unenforceable guildeline that was actually written by an older gal in my club. She did this so a label would be made to keep her from liability. What she found out is that nothing keeps you from liability not even a Grade A dairy liscence. I can tell you the filthiest places to buy milk is some of our Grade A dairies in Texas. Remember they only liscense the facility that produces, the milk....not the filthy barn or the sickly goats. The inspector can trip over dead or dieing goats in the barn to get to the milkroom, and will still pass the dairy. Vicki
     
  13. airotciv

    airotciv Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks everyone, I did check on the laws in Oregon and this is what I found. Raw goat or sheep milk sales are legal on the farm, no permit necessary unless I have 9 or more goats. But the state prohibits advertising for on farm sales. So how do I sell it? :bash: That also goes for cheese, butter and yogurt. I'm a bit confussed about selling it as feed. I think I need Licenses. Still checking on that. Thanks for all the great info.
     
  14. Emily Anne

    Emily Anne Active Member

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    Here in NC we get cosomers by word of mouth, it takes alittle while though to get enough customers, but once you have them, they keep coming back(if you have good milk :) )
     
  15. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    Wow, ten dollars an hour. When do I collect? Seriously get the Alpines and enjoy their colors and antics. My 3 year old is giving just under 2 gallons a day. She had triplets this year. Her daughter should probably give the same; will know when the 2 kids are weaned.
     
  16. debitaber

    debitaber Well-Known Member

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    I get between a gallon down t oa half a gal, to just over a gal, depends on the doe. my fist freshner gives just over half a gal, a milking. but my mini nubian, first freshner, with all her papers, and back ground in milking, only milked a cup and a half per day, for a week, then dried up. I was so disapointed, I spent a ton of money on her. can't keep her in, and not people friendly. I think she will be sold soon.