How much land to fence?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Genevieve M., Nov 16, 2006.

  1. Genevieve M.

    Genevieve M. Well-Known Member

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    We are getting 2 ND and one Nubian. I want to put up a temporary fence of T posts, welded wire and electric strands, so that we can move them to a new area every year.

    Our land is all brush and shrubs. How much land should I include for the 3 does, and whatever kids they may have for the first year.

    I'm thinking of making them a hoop house so that we could move that next year when we move the fence. We have wet warm weather, and sandy soil. What kind of a floor could I put in the hoop house?

    Thanks for your help.
     
  2. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    Id start with about a half acre if its really brushy. Then go from there depending on how much you want them to clear it. If you dont want to move it often just make it bigger to begin with. You dont say how much land you have to work with so its hard to say for sure. Its a trade off in fence expense vs how often you have to move it.

    In the shelter Id just use straw for bedding and when you move it youll have ready made compost. If you set it up on a high spot you wont need a real "floor"
     

  3. HappyFarmer

    HappyFarmer Well-Known Member

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    Where are you located? Do you have a cold winter season? Is it mostly edible (I mean there aren't any poisonous plants in there are there?). Is the brush heavy, medium, or light?

    Another consideration is predator control, whether that be strategically placed hotwire, locking up the goats at night, or lgd's.
    HF
     
  4. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    Instead of fencing off lightly (which goats will most likely be able to break/tear/get out of if you want it movable) why not make multiple, perminant pastures, and rotate them pasture to pasture? As far as size, make them as large as possible. They'll run out of browse unless you rotate them very well; prepare for needing to feed them some quality alfalfa hay all year. :) Good luck!
     
  5. Genevieve M.

    Genevieve M. Well-Known Member

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    We are outside of Houston, so not everything freezes back. I don't really know what is poisonous, and what is not. I'm not trying to feed them browse as their only food, but I don't want to over crowd them, or make their pen ridiculously large.

    I would say that our brush is Medium thick. There are some parts that you can not walk through.

    We have bought a Great Pyrenes puppy, but she won't be old enough to really protect them for awhile. In the meantime, we'll bring them into the barn at night, or when we are not home.

    We have several 2-acre plots that I would like to rotate them through. I plan on moving their pen every year.
     
  6. HappyFarmer

    HappyFarmer Well-Known Member

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    First I'd like to say I am in the northeast. My management is very different than someone from TX. The big difference is worms, the second is rainfall(IMO).

    In one pen we have 4 goats on 2 acres, divided into 3 sections. Grass-no brush whatsoever, and underground springs. This pasture maintains these goats from spring till fall, rotating every 3 weeks. Every weekend we put 3 horses in one selected section to keep up with the growing season & wormload. This maintains them till about December or so, with plenty to spare.

    I would say 2 acres would be plenty-in my area. In your state it may (probably) be different. The type of browse would play a major factor and your growing season. I understand the lower states have a real battle with worms-rotating pastures within each years designated area would be helpful.

    HF
    Added: Oh yeah, another difference is SNOW!