How Much Firewood Can I Haul?

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by Ken Scharabok, Aug 7, 2005.

  1. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    Background: A good friend is recovering (well, still surviving) from treatments for throat cancer. They perdominately heat with firewood. A sawmill in the general area has a large pile of railroad tie ends from freshly cut perdominately oak. Tie ends would make good firewood for them once split.

    I have a Dodge D350 duelly flatbed with a, I believe, 360 gas engine. Since the tie ends can be stacked very tightly I'm wondering what would be the maximum safe weight to carry expresessed in terms of cubic feet.

    Truck bed is roughly 6' x 9'. I'm guessing around 45 pounds per cubic foot.
     
  2. CoonXpress

    CoonXpress Well-Known Member

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    Ken, lookin at the Dodge specs. I'll say 2500lbs and that'll give about 250lbs of leeway. About 55 cuft.
    Will
     

  3. Cosmic

    Cosmic Well-Known Member

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    Look at the plate inside the driver's door. That will give the gross weight and the weight of the truck. Subtract the two and that gives the net hauling rated load for that particular truck. 2500 lbs sounds about right.

    You really have to think in terms of weight not cubic feet. Most light trucks if loaded anywhere close to max want to have the load over / forward of the axle. You can break axle or springs, especially if hauling over rough roads.

    Also check tire pressure and watch the tires when loading. They give a good indication when you are over doing it. If that wood really is that heavy, ~ a one foot layer over the entire bed would max you out. Doesn't sound right for most wood I have hauled. Best to stack it higher in the front and truck will ride a lot better. Better to haul more loads than overload and take the risks if the volume is such that serious overload can occur.
     
  4. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    First let me say, Ken, I'm surprised that you don't know what engine you have in your 1-ton.

    According to the Dodge website, a 1-ton with their current V-8 gasoline engine has a payload capacity of just over 5000lbs. Using your 45#/cf density of oak, you should easily be able to load a height of 2 feet.

    I had an old 3/4-ton Chevy with a 305ci gas engine with a fullsize box (6x8 feet). I had side rails that were as high as the cab. I'd fill that entire box (about (6x8x5 feet) with fresh cut oak and then drive 100 miles to home. I believe this was overweight, but the truck did fine. If you're not hauling far, and stay on roads where you'll not likely have to do a lot of braking, I'd say you could stack the oak ends three feet without a problem.
     
  5. Ed Norman

    Ed Norman Well-Known Member

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    I regularly put 1 ton of feed on my 1/2 ton Chevy. I've seen 2 tons of wood pellets on a 3/4 ton. A friend just brought home 3800 pounds of minerals and salt on his 3/4 ton, over bad dirt roads for 200 miles.

    Don't you have a flatbed you hauled a shed on once, that you could really load up?
     
  6. kmaproperties

    kmaproperties Well-Known Member

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    I have a F350 and regularly put 20 square of roofing at 220#/sq.
    4400# with tool boxes,ladder rack and drive wherever and never have a problem.Your TIRES are the weakest link on a one ton.
     
  7. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    Truck has dual wheels. It was originally a Jantar (?) car hauler. When it was repossessed that bed was taken off and I just purchase the cab and frame. 4' of the frame had to be cut off for the shorter bed.

    Yes, I have an equipment trailer with three trailer axles. Thought of using it, but I cannot maneuver it in the guy's driveway.

    Will also be pulling my trailer made from the bed of a pickup.

    Between the two, I was hoping to carry two cords, but that looks to be between 5-6 tons. Will just watch the leaf springs to see how they settle. I make 3' x 6' x 8' to be a bit more than one cord.

    And, yes, I don't know what size engine. Big one. But then I don't know what size engine I have in the Ford Ranger either. Do know both are gas.

    Good roads all the way with few hills.
     
  8. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    My 1974 Ford 1 ton often took over 6000 pounds into the scrap yard in a single trip, but that was back when they made real trucks. If you can put your knee on the bumper and still get 'bounce' out of the springs go ahead and keep loading. 'No bounce', unload a bit until reestablished. Ain't the meat - its the motion......
     
  9. farminghandyman

    farminghandyman Well-Known Member Supporter

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    the truck is probly rated for 10,000 pounds, and weighs about 6,000, that is book rating, I have hauled 10,000 on my ford one ton duley, don't recoment it but it will handle it, but 6,000 would not be out of line,

    another reason the max the one ton duel trucks are only rated at 9,999 or 10,000 lb is for DOT regulations, in some states once a truck is rated for more than 10,000 you fall into commercial trucks, and regulations that go with them,

    as far as I can tell, the ton rating is a military rating for cross country loads, and some how was or has been adopted by the motor companys,
    if you look at a rating plate on a military truck, you will see a cross country rating that is what the truck is to haul off road, say it is a 2 1/2 ton, the cargo weight on a cross country trip should not weigh more than 5000lb, and if you look at the highway rating you will discover the average is twice to three times that depending on the type of truck,

    if the truck was a car hauler it has carried 6000 pounds on it or more many a time,
     
  10. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A 1/2 ton truck is rated for 2000 lbs most times, a ton truck with duals better do more than double that - sure surprised if you aren't rated for near 6000#! Heck my little v6 Dakota with the trailer package can handle 2000 lbs on the plate.

    And it is common to overload a ton truck for a short haul on known roads at less than 65 mph, but we shouldn't _advise_ you to do so. :)

    --->Paul
     
  11. kmaproperties

    kmaproperties Well-Known Member

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    We do the bounce test like moopups said. that always works. as I said earlier we haul 4400 every week or so and have had much more in there.
     
  12. Blu3duk

    Blu3duk Well-Known Member

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    I used to hual a cord and half of red fir on my 74 1/2 ton chevy2x4 and put blocks between the spring and axle..... 60 pounds in the tires and travel about 35-45 mph.... which on the roads at that time of year was normal.... never had a roblem with bearing over heating, or blown tires..... i did put '62 3/4 ton international spring pack under it though and it improved the ability to hual weight.

    4x4x8 equals a cord of wood or 128 cubic feet. what you are hauling is solid, heavy, and probably have to pull through a scale shack or be seen by state troopers which can be a hairy thing in some states.

    Ive hauled 3-4 ton of hay on a one ton truck with a slighty longer bed, the only problems with that was to high and the load swayed side to side .... needed more spring.

    My cousin pulled a 14x70 trailerhouse with furniture about 150 miles with a '72 3/4 ton ford..... just kept adding 2x4's under the springs til it cleared the jack of the highway..... however even idaho has a law agin that now.

    William
     
  13. unioncreek

    unioncreek Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I had an old 1970 F350 that had a 10 foot box on it. The precious owner had it licensed for 12000 pounds. I didn't license it that heavy, but regularly put 8000 pounds of wood pellets on it. I only had the 360 engine so it was underpowered, but I took my time and hauled pellets 30 miles up and down hills.

    Bobg
     
  14. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If it was used as a car hauler the frame/ suspension has been beefed up. and the rules of D O T state 10001 # to 26000# is a Hot shot and Not under the normal D O T rules . This unit maybe able to handle up to 4 tons but double check first..
     
  15. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    Back from the adventure. The truck and trailer carried a good 2 1/2 cords of mixed oak and poplar without any problems. Cost was $15 for all we could hand load on the truck and $10 for all they could dump in the trailer - so about $12.50ish per cord there. $15 for my gas and about $30 for his helper. Still works out to about $35 or so a cord delivered and loose piled. Clean and very little of it will need to be split.

    This places makes pallets in addition to cutting ties and other sizes. The pile of ends was maybe 100' long, 40' wide and 12' or so high in the middle. We didn't even make a dent in it.

    Thank you for the reassurance.

    This pretty well sets up Dick for winter supplemental heat. I will still swing by the sawmill when I go into town to see if I can pick up more tie ends for him - then deliver when the trailer is full. One less thing he needs to worry about now.
     
  16. Janon

    Janon 993cc Geo Metro

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    To you Ken for helping out a friend in need - Cheers!
     
  17. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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    Isn't the Creasote in RR ties cancerous?
    I don't think I'd want to breathe that smoke!
     
  18. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    These are freshly cut tie ends. From the sawmills they are shipped to a separate plant for preserving. I don't believe they are allowed to use creosote these days as I thought it had been banned from such usage.
     
  19. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Ken, thanks for reporting back to us on the results. Too many times we help others by offering suggestions/recommendations and we never hear what the results were.

    Thanks again.
     
  20. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I was guessing these were the ends before treatment.

    My understanding is that us average Joe's can't be using creosote any more, but the big boys in trasportation (RR, highway, docks) still can because, frankly, it is available & there isn't anything else that works as well.

    --->Paul